The real silent Hill Experience




старонка17/19
Дата канвертавання26.04.2016
Памер1.04 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19

FUNGO

So then what does the difficulty setting do?Well, one change with Hard difficulty is that they move key items around, but never very far. A required puzzle item might have moved from one room to a different room in the same area, but chances are you won't even notice the difference. But, are the actual puzzles more difficult? The answer is, "no." Only one or two puzzles actually require more thought to solve on Hard difficulty, but if you've already solved it on Normal or Easy you don't have to worry about that, do you? All the combinations are the same! Safes with multiple dials do crazy puzzle-turns, and they just do them more on Hard, but otherwise there is no difference. The result is that even those of us that want the harder difficulty are brought down to the level of the people that don't.


ROSSETER

The only two Hard difficulty puzzles we had trouble with are the ones everyone else has trouble with. Look up "Silent Hill Downpour puzzle" on Google and it will return an auto-complete with these two puzzles, so we know that everyone is having this trouble. One is the license plate puzzle in the prison. You are supposed to use your blacklight to see the numbers 2234 and 5 hidden around this area.


FUNGO

As an actual puzzle it's not difficult, but you will never find the first number. Nobody has ever found the first number. We didn't care to find it because of the continuously respawning enemies. Nobody else on the internet cared to deal with them either it seems, because if you look it up like we did, you'll find plenty of people telling you the code or Let's Players just running up and using the code and nobody telling you how they know it. Guess what? There it is, in a spot nobody will ever look!


ROSSETER

The other problem puzzle is the mine train puzzle, not because of the difficulty but rather because of poor writing. We shouldn't have to spend as much time talking about this puzzle as we're about to, but we have to because, if you try to solve it the way it's supposed to be solved, it is impossible. This puzzle requires that you push colored buttons in an order specified by a poem. On Easy, it's no problem. It just lists the colors. On Normal the colors are still there, but in descriptive words. On Hard difficulty, you're expected to identify the color of items listed, but since it's not clear which items in the poem are actually describing colors, half of what's here is a flat-out lie.


Slate is gray and burning ash is orange, but you're supposed to ignore all of that and just pay attention to the word "ash". Three words into the poem you're already being lied to! Blood is mentioned three separate times (the second two are lies), and "Toluca's subterranean claws" would refer to stalactites and stalagmites, which are gray. But you're supposed to ignore those as well and just pay attention to the word "Toluca". Since Blue is the last button, you wouldn't have to worry about the rest, but (as far as you know) the sequence up to there is Gray, Orange, Red, Green, which will return an incorrect result immediately because you're only allowed four button presses. This leaves you staring at the poem for half-an-hour wondering which of these colors is a lie, forcing all kinds of twisted logic onto it.
Rosseter acts as if he's solving the puzzle in real-time.
Blood is listed three times, and gray nouns are also listed three times, so maybe it has something to do with threes? Or maybe the colors listed more than once are incorrect, so then the answer starts with Orange and ends with... Well there aren't any colors after Blue, so that can't be it... What about this word "wind", is that referring to "no color", so Gray again..? Maybe it's just nouns, and I push every color the exact number of times it says, which will end up turning Gray on and off again, so the first color is Red, but then it's off and on again later so Red ends it, and Gray gets turned back on again with "wind" and then off after Blue... unless wind doesn't count, which means it's still on after Blue... No, because that would be a five color answer ending in Red, so... Wait, maybe Toluca isn't the color, so that whole phrase is Gray because of the "claws", but then that means Gray is back on, but only after the first few colors...
DERFUZHWAR

Is this really how we're going to spend the next half-hour of the video, watching you try to figure out this puzzle in real-time?


ROSSETER

Hey, if I spent a whole hour of real life trying to figure this crap out before finally cheating and looking up the answer, we can spend three minutes talking about it. That's an entire hour of my life wasted because Tomm Hulett — I just know Tomm Hulett wrote this puzzle — because Tomm Hulett put the noun "slate" in the first sentence. It's a badly written puzzle, and it can't be solved in its current form.


FUNGO

I solved it by accident.


Rosseter mocks Fungo.
ROSSETER

"I solved it by accident..."


DERFUZHWAR

Don't be so childish.


ROSSETER

Oh, let's talk about "childish"! You can contrast that last one with the puzzles of the type your four-year-old might do in the waiting room at your dentist's office, including this head-scratcher...


Silent Hill: Downpour's "cottage puzzle" is shown.
... and a life-sized, mirror version of what equates to a "Spot the Differences" page in Highlights for Children.
FUNGO

The former happens during a Hansel & Gretel stage-play-come-to-life, where you play the part of a stagehand turning lights on and making sound effects in the correct order. Most reviewers seem to agree that the result of solving this puzzle is the best part of the game. Is it impressive? I think it's alright... Is the puzzle difficult? Not in the slightest.


ROSSETER

Apparently, this is a puzzle: "Push the button until it stops right." If this counts as a puzzle, then so does this endless staircase that they copied from Silent-


DerFuzhwar interrupts, threatening to punch Rosseter.
... another game I've played.
FUNGO

Reaching into this monster is also a puzzle. You x-ray it and then reach in. Believe it or not, this extremely easy puzzle has the potential of wasting another half-an-hour of your time. Not the puzzle itself, but the key you get from completing it. This is the key needed for this door. This key is also the one and only key in the entire game that Murphy will not automatically open his non-existent inventory to use. Every locked door in the game will prompt the use of an item, but this one will inform you that you need the key whether or not you have it. Since you're used to auto-using items by this point, you'll end up searching every last cranny and nook of the whole orphanage looking for a key you already possess.


ROSSETER

That's about the same amount of time you'll usual waste to complete a sidequest, which is where many of the game's puzzles are featured. The reward for completing a sidequest is never ever worth the trouble of solving its puzzle. Most of the time, the reward is health, ammo, or a weapon, but if you're running from combat you don't need any of those. Many are the scenario where you'll use up three boxes of handgun bullets and two healthkits fighting the sidequest's monsters only to receive one healthkit and a handgun as a reward. There's an achievement for every sidequest, and for three of them the achievement is the only reward, so if that's enough reward for you, then... congratulations.


DERFUZHWAR

I'm going to get me them trophies! They don't call me Wario for nothin'. Trophy boooards! DerFuzh represent!


ROSSETER

Some yield a super secret amazing crap weapon that you might think is really great but breaks just like all the rest, and if you try to save it for later it's stolen from you anyway!


There is a point of no return, but it's not made explicitly clear that it is a point of no return.
DERFUZHWAR

Oh, you mean a PONR?


ROSSETER

What's a PONR?


DERFUZHWAR

You know, a PONR. P-O-N-R. That's what we call it in the business.


ROSSETER

The butler business?


DerFuzhwar shakes his head derisively.
... My first time through, I was holding onto all my sidequest items to take care of later. Since I had no idea I wouldn't be able to use them after the... PONR... they were stuck in my inventory for the rest of the game.
FUNGO

The developers talk about how certain sidequests are good for revealing what they like to call "lore", and we should accept that as our reward. "Lore" is supposed to be information given about the town or the greater story that tells us something we didn't know — maybe some new information about the situation Murphy is in, the politics of Silent Hill, town history, these kinds of things. In the case of Downpour, lore = random ghost story.


"This guy stole a bunch of stuff from some people... Put their souls to rest. This guy killed his family... Put his soul to rest. This woman killed her autistic daughter... Put her soul to rest. Take this person's ashes and spread them at their 'special place'... to put their soul to rest."
ROSSETER

There is no extra story to be gained from completing sidequests except for the one where you free the birds to reveal ten seconds of video about Murphy having had a son at one time. He lived in this field.


FUNGO

One of the sidequests leads to an alternate ending, but it's a joke ending that adds nothing but sleeves.


ROSSETER

The only sidequest that might be worth completing is the hobo subway one, where the hobo unlocks the subway system that allows you to get around town easier. You give him a coat and a candy bar and then he dies at your feet. The only problem with that is that by the time you have all of the items needed to finish it, you don't need to get around town anymore because you've already done everything.


FUNGO

All this pointlessness of questing on the side left us wondering, "Why do I have to do these?" ... "Investigate the bank." Okay, I'll do it, but... why? I've already done a bunch of these quests, and I haven't seen anything that might spark my desire to do more of them. Why am I doing this?


"We need to modernize it a bit and make sure there's things to do, and so we came up with the sidequests."

- Tomm Hulett


I already have things to do. I'm playing this game, and in this game I have better things to do than putting people's souls to rest and exploring empty rooms that all look the same.
ROSSETER

On that note, the only thing about the mechanics that we think could be a good idea if used correctly is the door peek mechanic left over from Kazaam.


DERFUZHWAR

How many times, huh? How many? "On its own merit!" You can't compare it to SHAZAM!


No, not SHAZAM, "Kazaam".
DERFUZHWAR

... That's stupid.


ROSSETER

Okay, fine, there's an all new door peek mechanic that's really cool when you aren't using it on a chain link gate (which is how we're introduced to the concept). The very first door peek happens on a door you can see through... "Ooh, I wonder what's on the other side of this gate..."


FUNGO

With solid doors, it brings to mind lots of scenarios where there might be several routes leading to the same destination, and advancing carefully, checking behind each door for enemies for a clear route would be preferable to charging in come what may. This imaginative concept makes the first few door peekings very tense. After about twenty doors, you'll realize there's never anything to be tense about. The whole time, there's going to be a room you have to go into, there's one entrance to that room, and you're going through it whether or not there's an enemy on the other side. And there's never an enemy on the other side!


ROSSETER

The solution? Wandering enemies and multiple entrances to useful rooms. Let's say you check a door and there's an enemy behind it — leave it and go explore elsewhere. By the time you get back, the enemy might have wandered away. Or, find an alternate entrance to the room. This would heighten the tension by giving both you and the enemy a way to sneak up on each other. But since that's not the case, what we have here is a useless gameplay mechanic.


As far as I can remember, there's only one door in the entire game with an enemy directly behind it, and that room has one alternate way to enter. So they did it right once with a useless room that has nothing useful in it. We walked right in and got jumped because it's such a special case.
DERFUZHWAR

I get it already! Door peeking is not useful!


FUNGO

Ah, but is it not also frustrating? Introduce a static camera angle and useless becomes aggravating. This door here. If you've played the game, you know this door. It is almost impossible to get Murphy to go all the way through this door the first time you touch it, even if you already know that this door.


Why can't I just push the button and he goes through the door!?
ROSSETER

You can't just push the button and he does anything because he does things without pushing the button. Okay, sure, fine... but this mechanic can cause some veins to burst in some foreheads whenever ladders are involved. Every time you accidentally touch a ladder, he climbs the whole way, and you can't stop him. It's the worst when you just wanted to check an area past the ladder and he decides to climb instead. He climbs all the way up and then all the way down, and then you find out there wasn't anything over there anyway and climb all the way back up again. Oh, wasn't that a lovely waste of time?


This ladder in the orphanage is an especially big nuisance since it's so close to a doorway you need to get through several times. You can't keep him from climbing up and down every time you walk past. By the time you reach this particular ladder, you're used to the strange ways you need to manipulate Murphy to keep him from doing stupid crap. You reach the top, you let go of all the controls, push forward, and... piece of crap! Stop it!
DESIGNED TO FRUSTRATE
This ladder in the centennial building is the opposite. You can't get Murphy to climb it without at least forty-five seconds of finagling. All of these frustrations would have been avoided if they had just given us the choice of initiating these actions ourselves.
FUNGO

Well, maybe not... In the case of this one specific painting, the action button is useless unless you're standing in just the right spot... It's right there... Come on, Murphy, just get the painting! It's right there!


... I don't know why I want this painting so bad!
There are plenty of bugs like this in Downpour that can provide you with hours of entertainment.
FRUSTRATINGLY GLITCHY
DERFUZHWAR

I can see that the game might need a little bit of polish, and I see all the problems with story and gameplay. I'll give you that. But at least it's scary.


ROSSETER

Yeah, because that's the only thing that can save it now, right? You'd expect there to be a certain amount of "horror" in a "survival horror" game..? We know it's a matter of opinion, but we don't think it's scary and we can't think of anyone else who thinks it's scary. There are plenty of Let's Players who think it's scary, but I think that's just for dramatic purposes...


A Let's Play of Silent Hill: Downpour is shown with the Let's Player screaming over the action.
That guy's not scared, he's just an idiot.
It is revealed that DerFuzhwar was the Let's Player.
FUNGO

The game has all the butt-clenching terror of an amusement park spookhouse. The main menu is a great introduction to the kind of chills you'll experience, accompanied by the spooky sounds of a haunted house sound-effects CD from Walgreens. The train ride is a particularly blatant example of how not to scare a three-year-old girl. Ghostly hauntings? Are you scared by these? How about that rip in space-time over there? Isn't that terrifying? What about the creepy lighting? Does that create an atmosphere of horror for you?


ROSSETER

Ghostly reenactments of past horrors... False scares from monsters that were never there... Funhouse maze chase sequences...


"Objects come at you out of nowhere! Are you quick enough to avoid them?"

- Chai, Shenmue


Magic mirrors... Waterslides..!
Who is this game and what do they think they're trying to scare, puppies!?
FUNGO

The monsters aren't scaring any puppies either. What a bunch of goons! The prostitute clown sex dolls are stupid and annoying, and the rest all have goofy smiles. The Bogeyman is supposed to be the scariest thing in the game, but it's just a guy in a raincoat with a gas mask.


ROSSETER

In the concept art, you can see they had a clear vision for what they wanted with the Bogeyman. "Anything's fine as long as it has a gas mask on. Oh, we can't do all that cool stuff? Just a raincoat's fine."


DERFUZHWAR

I'm not scared of him. He's a baby killer. He kills babies.


FUNGO

I'm not scared of him because he was stolen from Deadly Premonition.


ROSSETER

I'm not scared of the prisoners because they were stolen from Condemned: Criminal Origins.


FUNGO

I'm not scared of that purple flashlight because it was also stolen from Condemned: Criminal Origins.


ROSSETER

I'm not scared of that part behind the curtain on stage because it was stolen from Max Payne.


FUNGO

I'm not scared of this game because I've played Silent Hill before.


DERFUZHWAR

Not fair!


ROSSETER

I'm not scared of that tornado because why is there a tornado? That's not scary.


FUNGO

I'm not scared of the monsters joyriding around town in demonic cop cars because that's got to be the most retarded thing I've ever seen.


DERFUZHWAR

I'm not scared of the spinning shivs.
ROSSETER

Why aren't you scared?


DERFUZHWAR

... Huh?
ROSSETER

Why aren't you scared? This is a Silent Hill game. It's supposed to be scary. Why aren't you scared?
DERFUZHWAR

Like I said before, not fair.


ROSSETER

It wasn't fair five seconds ago before this became Part II.

PART II: ON ITS TITLE'S MERIT
"In a perfect world, our game would be judged on its own merit, not how it matches up to its predecessors."

- Devin Shatsky


ROSSETER

This game is titled "Silent Hill: Downpour", and it's the eighth game in the series. Most of the people playing it are playing it based on the title alone. To say that we shouldn't compare it to its predecessors is to say that it's not a Silent Hill game. If that's how you feel, why title it that way? If you want it to stand alone, why not just let it stand alone? Why not call it "Downpour" and tell us, "It's inspired by Silent Hill?"


FUNGO

They don't even follow their own rule! Downpour has constant references to previous Silent Hill games, designed to play on your nostalgia.


ROSSETER

Capitalizing on the title and success of Silent Hill is one thing (and however you choose to feel about that one thing, whatever. Doesn't matter), but don't tell us to forget everything we know about Silent Hill just so Downpour won't be overshadowed by its ancestry. We'll be comparing Downpour to that ancestry now under the assumption that everybody watching this video has seen the rest of The REAL Silent Hill Experience from the beginning, so if you haven't seen it by now, go take a look first.


FUNGO

When it comes to gameplay, the developers of Silent Hill: Downpour are hellbent on changing everything we loved about the original mechanics for no reason other than that the original Silent Hill games worked with traditional survival horror gameplay mechanics, and those are old. Tomm Hulett hasn't made it difficult to see how he feels about them. Take a look at the HD Collection review to find out more.


"We're making it easier to play. The old games, which people like, are from the early days of survival horror. They're a little bit clunky with the controls, and combat is weird. I hear from a lot of fans that they try to convince their friends to play Silent Hill 2, and their friends just aren't interested. Well, one of the reasons is that the controls are hard to get into. If you're playing all these modern games that are easy to control and intuitive, you don't want to go back to these clunky games — it's just not worth it."

- Tomm Hulett


ROSSETER

That's how you feel? "There's no value in Silent Hill 2 past the controls, so if you can't get used to them, then it's not worth playing?"


DERFUZHWAR

Homecoming. Get used to it or don't play. That's what you said.


ROSSETER

But what we didn't say is that Silent Hill isn't worth the trouble. That may not be what he means, but what he's definitely trying to get at is that Downpour's controls are just so much better than anything Team Silent could do. You want to talk about a reason to play a game... Oh man, Downpour's controls... You just have to try these controls. They're so good at conveying the idea that Murphy Pendleton sucks at fighting.


"We definitely looked at the old games, but we didn't do things 'the old way' if there was a better way to get those ideas across. For example, our combat system is far more fluid and complex than the one in Silent Hill 2. But in the end, both approaches communicate 'this character is not good at fighting.'"

- Tomm Hulett


FUNGO

Traditional survival horror controls aren't "bad" just because they're old. They got it right the first time! Tank controls for movement, R1 readies the weapon, action button uses the weapon once it's ready. It works great and has done for fifteen years. Its simplicity was its genius.


ROSSETER

It used to be that if combat was difficult, it's because you were bad at it. In Downpour, they achieve the feeling that it's because Murphy is bad at it. They give the enemies all these different abilities and Murphy doesn't have the skill required to deal with them. Why not? Because that's how Tomm thinks the game is supposed to be.


FUNGO

This idea that combat in Silent Hill is supposed to be bad because the characters are just normal, everyday people is a load of crap. The combat in Silent Hill games is the way it is because it's the traditional survival horror way of handling combat.


ROSSETER

Those S.T.A.R.S. members are a highly trained police task force, and they're fighting exactly the same way. Explain that. And Silent Hill characters are way more efficient fighters than they ever were. You won't catch any self-respecting S.T.A.R.S. member strafing.


FUNGO

Remember when we said that, like, years ago?


ROSSETER

Most people want Resident Evil to go back to the way it was in those first few games. But, Silent Hill? No, "Silent Hill's combat was always bad and needed to change," so let's change it from a combat system that some people who would never play a Silent Hill game have a problem with to one that everybody has a problem with.


DERFUZHWAR

You can't please everybody.


ROSSETER

Yeah, but you have to please somebody. Each successive Silent Hill game before Downpour has attempted to get further and further away from the gameplay of the originals, and the changes they make are always met with a negative reaction from people who were expecting a traditional Silent Hill game.

1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19


База данных защищена авторским правом ©shkola.of.by 2016
звярнуцца да адміністрацыі

    Галоўная старонка