Tanks specification




Дата канвертавання25.04.2016
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TANKS SPECIFICATION:

British M4 Sherman Tulip Tank with Turret Mounted Tempest Rocket Launchers
Scale: 1/29

Length: 8”

Width: 3.5”
Sherman Tulip - British Sherman with two 3-inch ("60lb") RP-3 rockets on rails added to the turret. Used by the 1st Coldstream Guards at the Rhine in 1945.

British M4A3 Sherman 'Firefly' Medium Tank
Scale: 1/29

Length: 8”

Width: 3.5”
Sherman Firefly - British/Canadian Sherman I or V re-armed with QF 17 pounder (76.2 mm) anti-tank gun with C added to designation (as in Sherman IC or VC).

German Flakpanzer V Anti-Aircraft Gun
Scale: 1/29

Length: 8”

Width: 3.9”
Flakpanzer IV is the general designation for a series of self-propelled anti-aircraft guns based on the Panzerkampfwagen IV chassis
German Sd. Kfz. 141 PzKpfw III Ausf. M Medium Tank
Scale: 1/31

Length: 8.1”

Width: 3.6”
The Panzer III was designed as a medium tank, with a high-velocity 37 mm gun. Pre-war production was 98 vehicles. During the war, the Pz III was upgunned to a 50 mm L/42 gun, then to an even higher velocity 50 mm L/60 gun, in order to improve its anti-tank performance. A low-velocity 75 mm gun was also fitted (using the same mount as the early Panzer IV), but since the tank was not large enough to fit a high-velocity 75 mm gun, production was halted mid-war, although the chassis continued to be used to build assault guns.
German Sd. Kfz. 161 PzKpfw IV Ausf. D Medium Tank with Short-Barrel 75mm Gun & Side Armor
German Sd. Kfz. 161 PzKpfw IV Ausf. D Medium Tank with Short-Barrel 75mm Gun & Side Armor
German Sd. Kfz. 161 PzKpfw IV Ausf. G Medium Tank
German Sd. Kfz. 161-1 PzKPfw IV Ausf. F2 Medium Tank
Scale: 1/29

Length: 8”

Width: 3.9”
The Panzer IV was designed alongside the Panzer III. The Panzer IV was a slightly larger and heavier tank, and with its large calibre low velocity gun, it was designed to break through enemy positions. Pre-war production was 211 tanks. Originally armed with a low-velocity 75 mm L/24 gun, in 1942 this was upgraded to a 75 mm L/43 gun, and 1943 to a 75 mm L/48 gun.


German Sd. Kfz. 162 Jagdpanzer IV Tank Destroyer with Schurzen Side Armor Skirts
Scale: 1/33

Length: 8.1”

Width: 3.7”
The Jagdpanzer IV, Sd.Kfz. 162, was a tank destroyer based on the Panzer IV chassis built in three main variants. As one of the casemate-style turretless Jagdpanzer ("Hunting tank") designs, it was developed against the wishes of Heinz Guderian, the inspector general of the Panzertruppen, as a replacement for the Sturmgeschütz III (StuG III). Guderian objected against the needless, in his eyes, diversion of resources from Panzer IV tank production, as the Stug III and Sturmgeschütz IV were still more than adequate for their role.


German Sd. Kfz. 166 Sturmpanzer IV Brummbar
Scale: 1/29

Length: 8”

Width: 3.9”
The Sturmpanzer IV (also known as Sturmpanzer 43 or Sd.Kfz. 166) was a German armoured infantry support gun based on the Panzer IV chassis used in the Second World War. It was used at the Battles of Kursk, Anzio, Normandy, and helped to put down the Warsaw Uprising. It was known by the nickname Brummbär (German: "Grumbler", not "Grizzly Bear") by Allied intelligence[1], a name which was not used by the Germans. German soldiers nicknamed it the "Stupa",[2] a contraction of the term Sturmpanzer.
German Sd. Kfz. 167 Sturmgeschutz IV Assault Gun with Zimmerit
German Sd. Kfz. 167 Sturmgeschutz IV Assault Gun
Scale: 1/32

Length: 8.2”

Width: 3.6”
The Sturmgeschütz IV (StuG IV) (Sd.Kfz. 167), was a German assault gun of the Second World War.

German Sd. Kfz. 182 PzKpfw VI King Tiger Ausf. A Heavy Tank with Porsche Turret
Scale: 1/31

Length: 8.1”

Width: 3.6”
Tiger I is the common name of a German heavy tank used in World War II, developed in 1942. The final official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen Tiger Ausf. E, often shortened to Tiger. It was an answer to the unexpectedly formidable Soviet armour encountered in the initial months of Operation Barbarossa, particularly the T-34 and the KV-1. The Tiger I design gave the Wehrmacht its first tank mounting the 88 mm gun, which had previously demonstrated its effectiveness against both air and ground targets. During the course of the war, the Tiger I saw combat on all German battlefronts. It was usually deployed in independent tank battalions, which proved to be quite formidable.
German Sd. Kfz. 251-9 Stummel Halftrack with 7.5cm Cannon
German Sd. Kfz. 251-10 3.7cm PaK Halftrack

Scale: 1/28

Length: 8.1”

Width: 2.9”
The Sd.Kfz. 251 (Sonderkraftfahrzeug 251) half-track was an armored fighting vehicle designed and first built by Nazi Germany's Hanomag company during World War II. The largest and best armored of the wartime half-tracks, the Sd.Kfz. 251 was designed to transport the panzergrenadiers of the German mechanized infantry corps into battle. Sd.Kfz. 251s were the most widely produced half-tracks of the war, with over 15,252 vehicles and variants produced in total by various manufacturers, and were commonly referred to simply as "Hanomags" by both German and Allied soldiers
M1A2 Abrams
Scale: 1/38

Length: 10.1”

Width: 8.2”
The M1 Abrams is a third-generation main battle tank produced in the United States. It is named after General Creighton Abrams, former Army Chief of Staff and Commander of US military forces in Vietnam from 1968 to 1972. The M1 is a well armed, heavily armored, and highly mobile tank designed for modern armored ground warfare.[5] Notable features of the tank include the use of a powerful gas turbine engine (fueled with JP8 jet fuel), the adoption of sophisticated composite armor, and separate ammunition storage in a blow-out compartment for crew safety. With a weight of close to 68 short tons (almost 62 metric tons), it is one of the heaviest main battle tanks currently in service.
M4_Sherman
M4A3_Sherman
The M4 Sherman, formally Medium Tank, M4, was the primary tank used by the United States during World War II. Thousands were also distributed to the Allies, including the British Commonwealth and Soviet armies, via lend-lease. In the United Kingdom, the M4 was named after Union General William Tecumseh Sherman, following the British practice of naming their American-built tanks after famous American Civil War generals. Subsequently the British name found its way into common use in the U.S.
US GMC DUKW 353 Amphibious Transport
Scale: 1/37

Length: 10”

Width: 2.6”
The DUKW (colloquially known as duck) is a six-wheel-drive amphibious truck that was designed by a partnership under military auspicies of Sparkman & Stephens and General Motors Corporation during World War II for transporting goods and troops over land and water and for use approaching and crossing beaches in amphibious attacks. Designed to last only long enough to meet the demands of combat, productionized Ducks, a modification of the 2-ton capacity "duece" trucks used by the US military in WWII, were later used as tourist craft in marine environments.
US M4A1 Sherman Medium Tank
Scale: 1/29

Length: 8”

Width: 3.5”
M4A1 - Continental radial engine; one-piece cast hull; 75-mm and 76-mm versions built. Users: US, Britain, South Africa, France (small numbers), China


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