Pokémon® dci™ Floor Rules 2002–2003 Tournament Season




Дата канвертавання25.04.2016
Памер73.08 Kb.
Pokémon® DCI Floor Rules

2002–2003 Tournament Season

Effective September 1, 2002
Introduction

The Pokémon DCI Floor Rules work in conjunction with the DCI Universal Tournament Rules, DCI Penalty Guidelines, and Pokémon trading card game rules. Players, spectators, and tournament officials must follow these documents while involved with DCI-sanctioned Pokémon tournaments. Individuals who violate sections of these documents will be subject to the appropriate provisions of the DCI Penalty Guidelines.


Note: Please see appendix B of the DCI Universal Tournament Rules for definitions of terms in this document.
200. General Pokémon Tournament Rules
201. Format and Ratings Categories

The DCI sanctions the following formats. They may be sanctioned as single or two player team events (Team Multiplay).


Constructed Formats

  • Unlimited

  • Modified


Limited Formats

  • Booster Draft

  • Rochester Draft

  • Sealed Deck

The DCI produces the following ratings categories:



  • Constructed (includes the Unlimited and Modified formats)

  • Limited (using the Booster Draft format)

  • Team Constructed (using the Modified format)

  • Team Limited (using the Sealed Deck format)


202. Authorized Cards

All Pokémon cards, including promotional cards released by Wizards of the Coast, Inc., are legal for tournament play.


All cards are interpreted using the appropriate card ruling section of the Pokémon Tournament Card Reference List. During sanctioned competition, players must refer to this version of a card to settle disputes concerning the interpretation of a card’s wording or powers. Card abilities are based on card text, not artwork.
Players may not use previously or newly discovered errors or omissions in the Pokémon Tournament Card Reference List to disrupt a tournament or otherwise abuse the rules. The head judge is the final authority for all card interpretations, and he or she may overrule the Pokémon Tournament Card Reference List when a mistake or error is discovered.
In accordance with section 35 of the Universal Tournament Rules, players choosing to use Pokémon cards with different backs must play with identical, opaque-backed card sleeves on all cards in the deck.
Example: A player has two Japanese and two English Squirtles in his deck. Because the deck contains two different card backs, he must place opaque-backed sleeves on all cards in his deck.
203. Card Interpretations

The head judge will base card rulings and interpretations on the local-language versions of the cards. For example, a tournament run in Berlin, Germany, will use the German interpretation of the cards.


Some Wizards of the Coast–managed events use one of two classes for determining card interpretation:


  1. At Class A events, the head judge will base card rulings and interpretations on the Japanese versions of the cards.




  1. At Class B events, the head judge will base card rulings and interpretations on the English versions of the cards


204. New Releases

All Pokémon trading card game sets and promotional cards produced by Wizards of the Coast are allowed in both DCI-sanctioned Constructed and Limited tournaments as soon as they are available.


However, new Pokémon trading card game sets may not necessarily be immediately allowed at some other Wizards of the Coast–managed events (which may occur between two to six weeks after the release date of the new set). Check wizards.com/Pokémon for information on specific events.
210. Pokémon Tournament Mechanics
211. Match Structure

One game is the default number of games in a Pokémon match, so if a tournament organizer chooses to run matches consisting of more than one game, he or she must announce this before the tournament begins. Match results are reported to the DCI for the purpose of inclusion in the worldwide ratings and rankings.


212. Match Time Limits

The following time limits are recommended for each round of a tournament:



  • Constructed tournaments—thirty minutes

  • Limited tournaments—thirty minutes

In addition, the following time limit is recommended for Limited tournaments:



  • For Draft, allow thirty minutes for deck registration and construction.


213. Who Plays First

The winner of a coin toss (or other random method) chooses who plays first.


For tournaments that include more than one game per match, after each game in a match, the loser of that game (even if the game loss was due to a penalty) decides whether to play first in the next game. If the game was a draw (so that there was no winner or loser), the player who decided who played first for that game chooses for the next game.
214. Pregame Procedures

Before play begins, players determine who plays first (see section 213).


The steps listed below are similar to what appears in the Pokémon rulebook.


  1. Both players draw their hands of seven cards.

  2. The active player (the one who is going first) checks to see if his or her hand contains a Basic or Baby Pokémon card. If the active player has no Basic or Baby Pokémon card in his or her hand, he or she reveals his or her hand and shuffles the hand back into his or her deck. The active player then redraws his or her hand to its initial size. (Remember, the active player’s initial hand size is seven cards.) The nonactive player may then draw up to two additional cards. The active player repeats this process until he or she has a Basic or Baby Pokémon card in his or her starting hand. This procedure is called a mulligan.

  3. The active player then places a Basic or Baby Pokémon card face down in front of himself or herself. He or she does not have to choose this Pokémon to be the active Pokémon.

  4. The nonactive player (the player who is going second) checks to see if his or her hand contains a Basic or Baby Pokémon card. If the nonactive player has no Basic or Baby Pokémon card in his or her hand, he or she reveals his or her hand and shuffles the hand back into his or her deck, then draws a new hand equal to the number of cards that they had prior. The active player may then draw up to two additional cards. The nonactive player repeats this process until he or she has a Basic or Baby Pokémon card in his or her starting hand.

  5. The nonactive player will then choose a Basic or Baby Pokémon card and put that into play as his or her active Pokémon. He or she will then choose to place any other Basic or Baby Pokémon on his or her Bench.

  6. The active player will then choose a Basic or Baby Pokémon card and make that Pokémon active; he or she will then choose to place Pokémon on his or her Bench until he or she is ready to begin play.

  7. Both players will now set aside six prize cards and place them, face down, in front of them. In Booster Draft tournaments, players set aside only four Prize cards instead of the usual six.


215. Mulligan Rule

If a player’s initial hand does not contain a Basic or Baby Pokémon card, that player should show his or her opening draw to the opponent, shuffle that hand back into his or her deck, present the deck for additional shuffling/cutting, and draw equal to the number of cards that they had prior. If the player still has no Basic or Baby Pokémon cards in his or her next draw, he or she may repeat this process. See section 214.


216. End-of-Match Procedures

A player in midturn when the end of the round is announced is allowed to complete his or her turn before the match result is determined. (A player in midturn is someone who has drawn a card for his or her current turn.) The player with the least amount of Prize cards remaining on the table is then considered the winner. If both players have an equal number of Prize cards, the game is considered a draw.


If a judge assigned a time extension (because of a long ruling, deck check, or other reason) then the end-of-match procedure does not occur until the end of the time extension.
217. Determining a Match Winner

For Swiss tournaments using more than one game per match, the winner of a match is the player with the most game wins in the match. If both players have equal game wins, then the match ends in a draw.


In single-elimination rounds, matches may not end in a draw. After the normal end-of-match procedure is finished, the player with the least amount of Prize cards remaining on the table is then considered the winner.
220. Rules for Constructed Tournaments
221. Deck-Size Limits

Constructed decks must contain exactly sixty cards.


With the exception of basic energy, a player’s deck may not contain more than four copies of any individual card, counted by English card title equivalent. (This rule is identical to what appears in the Pokémon rulebook.)
222. Sideboard Use

No sideboards are allowed in Pokémon tournaments.


225. Unlimited Deck Construction

Unlimited decks may consist of cards from all Pokémon card sets and all promotional cards released by Wizards of the Coast. New card sets are allowed in Unlimited tournaments as soon as the product is available.

.
The following cards are banned in Unlimited tournaments:


  • The promo card known as “Ancient Mew”

  • _______’s Pikachu (The promo card known as “Happy Birthday Pikachu”)


226. Modified Deck Construction

Modified decks may include cards from the following Pokémon card sets:



  • Neo Genesis™ expansion ()

  • Neo Discovery™ expansion ()

  • Neo Revelation™ expansion ()

  • Southern Islands Collection™ expansion ()

  • Neo Destiny™ expansion ()

  • Legendary Collection™ expansion ()

  • Expedition™ expansion

  • Any new post-Expedition expansion

  • Cards with the promo expansion symbol ()

With the exception of basic Energy cards (Grass, Fire, Water, Lightning, Psychic, and Fighting) and previously printed copies of legal cards, cards from the following sets are not allowed in Modified tournaments:




  • Base Set (no expansion symbol)

  • Jungle™ expansion ()

  • Fossil™ expansion ()

  • Base Set 2 expansion ()

  • Team Rocket™ expansion ()

  • Gym Heroes™ expansion ()

  • Gym Challenge™ expansion ()

The following cards are banned in Modified tournaments:




  • The promo card known as “Ancient Mew”

  • _______’s Pikachu (The promo card known as “Happy Birthday, Pikachu!”)

  • Sneasel (Neo Genesis version)

Cards stamped with Prerelease and Wizards of the Coast® logos do not count as promo cards but rather as cards from their original sets. Check the expansion symbols (if any) to determine whether the card is legal in Modified. New card sets are allowed in Modified tournaments as soon as the product is available.


230. Rules for Limited Tournaments
231. Deck-Size Construction Rules

Limited decks must contain exactly forty cards. Players are not restricted to four of any one card in Limited tournament play. A player uses that exact 40 card deck throughout the tournament. All additional cards gained from the draft or sealed event not used in the 40 card deck must be removed from the tournament.


232. Prize Cards

In Limited tournaments, players set aside only four Prizes instead of the usual six.


233. Materials Provided

Tournament organizers and/or the head judge may choose to provide basic Energy cards to players for the tournament. If the organizer provides basic Energy cards, he or she must make available the same amount of basic Energy cards to each tournament player. Organizers must announce before and during event registration whether they will provide players with access to basic Energy cards. Organizers may require players to return their basic Energy cards when they leave the tournament.


234. Rules for Sealed Deck Tournaments

Before the first round, players may add as many basic Energy cards to their decks as desired; no maximum is imposed.


Each player should be given five booster packs of the Legendary Collection set for a Pokémon Sealed Deck event.
235. Rules for Booster Draft Tournaments

Before the first round, players may add as many basic Energy cards to their decks as desired; no maximum is imposed.


Each player should be given five Pokémon booster packs. Suggested product breakdowns include:
2 Gym Heroes boosters and 3 Gym Challenge boosters

2 Team Rocket boosters and 3 Neo Genesis boosters

2 Neo Genesis boosters and 3 Neo Revelation boosters

2 Neo Genesis boosters and 3 Neo Destiny boosters

2 Neo Revelation boosters and 3 Neo Destiny boosters

5 Base Set 2 boosters


236. Rules for Rochester Draft Tournaments (see appendix A for details)

Before the first round, players may add as many basic Energy cards to their decks as desired; no maximum is imposed.


Each player should be given six Pokémon booster packs. Suggested product breakdowns include:
3 Gym Heroes boosters and 3 Gym Challenge boosters

3 Team Rocket boosters and 3 Neo Genesis boosters

3 Neo Genesis boosters and 3 Neo Revelation boosters

3 Neo Genesis boosters and 3 Neo Destiny boosters

3 Neo Revelation boosters and 3 Neo Destiny boosters

6 Base Set 2 boosters


240. Rules for Team Tournaments

241. General Team Requirements

Each individual team must have unique, team-specific information, including:

• a team name,

• a team affiliation, if applicable (sponsor, school, retail store, and so on),

• a team city,

• a team state/province,

• a team country, and

• two team members (each with a valid DCI membership number).


Multiple teams may have the same affiliations, cities, states/provinces, and/or countries.
242. Team Names

Wizards of the Coast reserves the right to disallow any team name that it deems offensive and/or obscene. Tournament organizers and certified head judges should discourage teams from registering team names that may be considered offensive and/or obscene. Once a team is registered at a high-level event (meaning that the team has registered and played in a team-format premier event), that name is considered taken and may not be used by any other team.



243. Team Composition and Identification

A valid team consists of two members, as appropriate to the DCI-sanctioned team format (see section 201). A team is identified by the individual DCI membership numbers of its respective members. Individual DCI members may be members of more than one valid team.


A team continues to exist as long as its respective members choose to identify themselves as a team. Any change in team membership (that is, the removal and/or addition of a member) constitutes a new team, with new team-specific information (see section 239). A team may change its name, affiliation, city, state/province, or country without becoming a new team.
244. Valid Team Participation and Player Designation

DCI-sanctioned team tournaments are open to teams consisting of two members. Only valid teams of the appropriate size are eligible for DCI-sanctioned team tournaments. If one player of a team drops or is disqualified from an event, the entire team is dropped from that event.


Each team entering a DCI-sanctioned team tournament must provide the tournament organizer with its team-specific information (see section 239) when registering for the event. Failure to provide this information will result in the team’s disqualification from the tournament.
Teams must designate player positions during event registration. Each team must designate who is Player A and who is Player B. Players retain these designations throughout the entire tournament.
245. Team Constructed Tournaments

Event results for each DCI-sanctioned team Modified Constructed tournament are merged into one set of Constructed ratings for each team.


246. Team Limited Tournaments

Event results for each DCI-sanctioned team Limited tournament (Sealed Deck) are merged into one set of Limited ratings for each team.


Appendix A—Specific format procedures
A. Pokémon Rochester Draft Tournament Rules

You many now sanction Pokémon Rochester Draft events. Please see wizards.com/dci for more information on sanctioning events.




  1. Player Distribution

Players are assembled randomly into drafting circles (called pods) of roughly equal size at the discretion of the tournament organizer or head judge. All pods should preferably contain seven or eight players. A tournament official then distributes an equal amount of booster packs to each player in the pod. Players within a pod may play only against other players within that pod.
Players may not talk or communicate to others during a draft. As players draft cards, they must place their cards in one orderly pile in front of them. Drafted cards may be reviewed only between the drafting of each pack.


  1. Booster Pack Distribution

Due to booster pack size and evolution issues of the game, six Pokémon booster packs are recommended for each player for Rochester Draft events.
The optimized current product breakdown for each player is three Gym Heroes boosters and three Gym Challenge boosters. If this product is not readily available, see section 236 for other booster pack combinations.
Two booster packs are opened by the Active player for each phase of each round of the draft. The two packs of the oldest set are opened first. This does mean that some rounds will have the Active player opening one booster pack of one set and one booster pack of another.
Example #1: Each player has been given three Gym Heroes booster packs and three Gym Challenge booster packs. For the first round, each Active player will open and place out the cards from two Gym Heroes booster packs (after removing the basic Energy cards). For the second round, each Active player will open and place out the cards from one Gym Heroes booster pack and one Gym Challenge booster pack. For the third round, each Active player will open and place out the cards from the final two Gym Challenge booster packs.
Example #2: Each player has been given three Team Rocket booster packs and three Neo Genesis booster packs. For the first round, each Active player will open and place out the cards from two Team Rocket booster packs (after removing the basic Energy cards). For the second round, each Active player will open and place out the cards from one Team Rocket booster pack and one Neo Genesis booster pack. For the third round, each Active player will open up and place out the cards from the final two Neo Genesis booster packs.


  1. Deck Construction

Once drafting is complete, players have thirty minutes to build decks from the cards they selected. For Pokémon Rochester Draft, players must build a 40-card deck. Basic Energy cards are provided.
Players are not limited to four copies of any nonbasic Energy card in Limited play. You can place as many copies of any card in your deck from what you drafted as you choose.


  1. Rochester Draft Rules

Once a player has indicated his or her drafting selection by touching a card, he or she may not select a different card.
Before the tournament begins, the head judge must announce how much time each player has to select a card. For Pokémon Rochester Draft, this is generally three to four seconds. If a player fails to select a card in that time, the pod judge issues that player the “oldest” card still remaining from the booster pack.
Example: The Active player lays out cards from two booster packs, removing basic Energy cards and placing them aside. The cards can be considered to be in chronological order (1–20), where 1 is the first (oldest) card on the table and 20 is the last (newest) card on the table. The Active player places the first seven cards across the top row (starting in the upper left corner facing that player), then seven cards along the next (second) row, then the remaining cards along the bottom (third) row.
If a player fails to draft in a timely manner, the cards on the table are examined by the pod judge, and the first card that was placed on the table is given to the player. If that card has already been selected, the second card that was placed on the table is given, and so on. This would be the card closest to the top left corner.
During a Rochester Draft, players must always display the most recent card they drafted in the current pack face up. When all cards are drafted from the current pack, players may move their cards from that pack to any position.


  1. Rochester Draft Table Preparation

Booster packs are divided into groups before the draft table is set. Each player is given an identical number and mix of booster packs from various sets (see section 2 of appendix A, Booster Pack Distribution).
In preparation for each phase of the round of the draft, each Active player lays out the entire contents of two booster packs face up on the table, with the cards facing him or her (see section 6 of appendix A, Rochester Draft—Active Player Rotation). Players are given thirty seconds to review the cards before drafting begins.


  1. Rochester Draft—Active Player Rotation

The player drafting first from the cards presented on the table is called the Active player. The first Active player is the participant in the first seat, designated by the judge. All players in each drafting pod serve as the Active player once for each booster pack group (see Section 6, Rochester Draft Table Preparation), with the Active player moving between players as follows:


  • In a clockwise direction for the first booster pack group (beginning with the first Active player)

  • In a counterclockwise direction for the second booster pack group (starting with the last Active player in the first group)

  • Returning to a clockwise direction for the third booster pack group (beginning again with the first Active player)




  1. Rochester Draft Order

The draft order moves in a horseshoe pattern, beginning with the Active player and continuing around the table to the last participant in the group who has not yet drafted a card. The last player in the group selects two cards—instead of one—before drafting continues in reverse order, moving back to the player who began the drafting (the first person who drafted from the pack). After all cards are drafted, the table judge clears the drafting area and prepares for the next booster pack.
Example #1: Eight players are seated around a table. They are numbered 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 in a clockwise order. The Active player is Player 1. The first booster packs for Player 1 are opened, basic Energy cards are removed, and then the cards are placed face up in three rows in front of Player 1. After the thirty-second review period has expired, the draft order is as follows:
Player 1—card 1 Player 8—card 8 Player 2—card 15

Player 2—card 2 Player 8—card 9 Player 1—card 16

Player 3—card 3 Player 7—card 10 Player 1—card 17

Player 4—card 4 Player 6—card 11 Player 2—card 18

Player 5—card 5 Player 5—card 12 Player 3—card 19

Player 6—card 6 Player 4—card 13 Player 4—card 20

Player 7—card 7 Player 3—card 14
The next packs to be opened would be Player 2’s first two boosters.
Example #2: Seven players are seated around a table. They are numbered 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 in a clockwise order. The Active player is Player 1. The first two booster packs for Player 1 are opened, basic Energy cards are removed, and then the cards are placed face up in three rows in front of Player 1. After the thirty-second review period has expired, the draft order is as follows:
Player 1—card 1 Player 7—card 8 Player 1—card 15

Player 2—card 2 Player 6—card 9 Player 2—card 16

Player 3—card 3 Player 5—card 10 Player 3—card 17

Player 4—card 4 Player 4—card 11 Player 4—card 18

Player 5—card 5 Player 3—card 12 Player 5—card 19

Player 6—card 6 Player 2—card 13 Player 6—card 20

Player 7—card 7 Player 1—card 14
The next packs to be opened would be Player 2’s first 2 boosters.
Example #3: Eight players are seated around a table. They are numbered 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 in a clockwise order. They are now drafting the second round of a Rochester Draft. This means they will draft in a counterclockwise order for this round. The Active player is now Player 8, the last Active player in the first group. The two booster packs for Player 8 are opened (older set booster pack first), basic Energy cards are removed, and then the cards are placed face up in three rows in front of Player 8. After the thirty-second review period has expired, the draft order is as follows:
Player 8—card 1 Player 1—card 8 Player 7—card 15

Player 7—card 2 Player 1—card 9 Player 8—card 16

Player 6—card 3 Player 2—card 10 Player 8—card 17

Player 5—card 4 Player 3—card 11 Player 7—card 18

Player 4—card 5 Player 4—card 12 Player 6—card 19

Player 3—card 6 Player 5—card 13 Player 5—card 20

Player 2—card 7 Player 6—card 14
The next packs to be opened would be Player 7’s second two boosters.


  1. Suggested Tournament Round Procedures

The procedure will vary depending on the number of tournament participants, the size of the pods, and so on, but it is recommended that after completion of the draft and deckbuilding that each pod is played as a separate eight-person event. This means that each seven- or eight-person pod plays three rounds of Swiss (using byes in a seven-person pod). Depending on the number of pods, the Top 1 or 2 players from each pod move on to the Top 8 finals.
Once the Top 8 is determined from the pods, those Top 8 players put their decks aside, get new product, and then Rochester draft, again following the same rules as above. These eight players then play single-elimination games to determine the final results.
B. Pokémon Rules for Team Play

Generally, Pokémon trading card game rules and effects work the same way in multiplayer games as they do in one-on-one games.


Getting Started

  1. Each player uses a standard 60-card deck built using the Modified format (cards from the Neo Genesis set and later sets plus promo cards). During the registration process, each team (made up of two players) designates one team member as Player A and the other as Player B. These designations cannot change over the course of the tournament.




  1. Players sit around a single table, with team partners sitting adjacent to each other. Player A from each team sits opposite of Player A from an opposing team. Player A of a team sits to the left of his or her Player B teammate (in a clockwise direction).





  1. Player B from one team flips a coin, and Player B from the other team calls out the desired result. The team that wins the flip gets to decide which team starts first. After setup, Player A of the starting team (hereafter known as Team 1) takes his or her first turn. Play then moves on to the player to the left (Player B of the opposing team, hereafter known as Team 2) and continues clockwise (starting order: 1A, 2B, 2A, 1B).




  1. Player 1A must first declare whether he or she needs to take a mulligan. If so, then each member of the opposing team may draw up to one card (totaling two for the team). Then the player to the left goes through this process, then the player to his or her left, until reaching Player 2A. (The mulligan order is the same as the play order: 1A, 2B, 2A, 1B.). This will help to offset some of the disadvantage of your team going first (player 1B is the least likely to have to mulligan).




  1. For Constructed play, Player A on each team sets out three Prizes and Player B on each team sets out two Prizes into the middle of the game area (for a total of five Prizes per team.)




  1. For Sealed Deck play (each player plays with 40-card decks), each player on each team sets out two Prizes (for a total of four Prizes per team). These Prizes are set out in the middle of the game area to make sure they don’t get accidentally mixed in with any discard piles, decks, or benches.




  1. Each round of team play lasts for fifty minutes. During that time, each player must take his or her turn in a timely manner. It is up to the officiating judge to determine that this occurs.


Attacking

  1. When it is your turn, your Pokémon can attack either of the opposing team members’ Pokémon. The opponent you choose controls the Defending Pokémon for any effects.




  1. If an attack states “your Pokémon,” you may choose to count or affect your Pokémon or your teammate’s Pokémon. If an attack effect states “your opponent’s Pokémon,” you may choose which opponent that effect affects. An attack effect stating “Defending Pokémon,” is determined by which opponent you choose to attack.




  1. If an attack states “all Pokémon” or “all Benched Pokémon,” it affects all four players’ stated Pokémon.


Targets of Effects

  1. All Trainer, Pokémon Power, and attack effects that specify “you” can be played on either you or your partner. All Trainer, Pokémon Power, and attack effects that specify “your opponent” can be played on either member of the opposite team.




  1. In cases in which your opponent gets to choose something of “yours,” then the chosen opponent gets to choose any “your” on the entire team. For example, if you play Double Gust, you choose which opponent gets affected (and later which Pokémon), and that opponent gets to choose which team member gets affected (and then which Pokémon gets brought up).




  1. Only the owner of a Pokémon, Trainer card, or effect can choose whether to use that effect or allow his or her teammate to do so. You cannot use any of your teammate’s Pokémon Powers, attacks, or effects on your turn.




  1. Once you designate which player is “you” or “opponent,” then every instance of “you” or “opponent” in that effect refers to that same player (except for costs).




  1. Cards and effects that refer to both players affect only the chosen players on each team. Cards that affect all players affect every player in the game.




  1. You cannot attach any of your cards to any of your teammate’s Pokémon. You also cannot draw, trade, or transfer any cards between you or your teammate’s cards, decks, or Pokémon.




  1. You can trade counters, markers, or effects between you and your teammate’s Pokémon, when applicable.




  1. Whenever you put into play any continuous Pokémon Power that specifies “your opponent,” you must immediately designate which opponent it is targeting (such as in the case of Slowking’s Mind Games). Whenever you put into play any continuous Pokémon Power that specifies “your Pokémon,” you must immediately designate whether it is targeting your Pokémon or your teammate’s Pokémon (such as in the case of Dodrio’s Retreat Aid or Meganium’s Wild Growth).




  1. Once an effect has its target designated, that target cannot change while the Pokémon that originated the effect remains in play. This means that if you had Slowking target one opponent, if that player leaves the game, Slowking’s Pokémon Power cannot be retargeted unless that Slowking leaves and then reenters play.




  1. Stadium cards affect all players in a game. Only one Stadium card may be in play in any game at any one time (per the standard rules).


Paying for Effects

Many Pokémon Powers, Attacks, and Trainers have costs that go with playing or using an effect.


For example, playing a Professor Elm or a Time Capsule doesn’t let you play any more Trainers that turn, using Entei’s Howl ends your turn, and so on. These costs are always applied to the person playing the card (not necessarily the one using the effect from the card). This means that when you play Professor Elm, whether you shuffle your hand back into your deck or allow your teammate to do so, you cannot play any further Trainer cards that turn. This means that you cannot split the effects of a card between both players on a team (yours or the opposing team).
Example: If you play Pokémon Breeder Fields, you must choose either one or two of your Pokémon or one or two of your teammate’s Pokémon. You cannot choose one of each.
When Effects Trigger

All Special Conditions and effects that trigger at the end of each turn trigger at the end of each player’s turn (like the Poison or Asleep Special Conditions). Special Conditions that trigger or end at the end of your turn still wait until the end of your particular turn (such as the Paralysis Special Condition).


Earning Prizes

  1. When a player earns a Prize by Knocking Out an opposing Pokémon, he or she can choose to draw one of his or her Prizes or have his or her teammate draw one of his or her Prizes. If one player has already drawn his or her last Prize, the next time he or she earns the right to draw another Prize, his or her teammate must draw one of his or her Prizes instead.




  1. If a triggered Pokémon Power, attack, or special condition Knocks Out one of your Pokémon, then the players on the opposing team may discuss which of them gets to draw a Prize, with Player A making the final decision.




  1. The game continues until either one team has drawn all four of its Prizes or both players on a team are eliminated (they have both had their last in-play Pokémon Knocked Out or they have both decked themselves).


Leaving the Game

  1. If a player leaves the game (has his or her last in-play Pokémon Knocked Out or has been decked), all of his or her cards (including Stadium cards) are removed from the game. His or her teammate must add a number of cards from the bottom of his or her deck equal to the number of remaining Prizes the removed teammate had left. In the event that the remaining team player does not have enough cards in his or her deck to place out these Prize cards, that player is considered to be decked and is eliminated from the game. If the remaining team player does have enough cards, play continues as before (each remaining player taking turns in a clockwise manner) until both players on one team are eliminated.




  1. If a player is eliminated and that player wishes to remain involved in the game, he or she must stay at the table and may look at his or her partner’s hand and advise him or her. The remaining player, however, still makes all final decisions.




  1. Eliminated players who remain at the table to advise are considered active participants in the game and, as such, penalties can still be assessed to them or to their teams if necessary.




  1. One player on a team may not withdraw from a game. In the case that one player does so, the game is over and the other team wins.


Talking during the Game

  1. Table talk is unlimited. You may tell your teammate anything but you cannot show your partner any of the cards in your hand unless he or she has been eliminated and has chosen to stay in the game to advise.




  1. All talk between players must be done above the table and must be done in such a way that the other team can hear the talk clearly. All verbal communication must be done in the designated local language.


Appendix B—Specific Card Clarifications for Team Play
Alakazam’s Damage Swap: This Pokémon Power reads “As often as you like during your turn (before your attack), you may move 1 damage counter from 1 of your Pokémon to another as long as you don’t Knock Out that Pokémon.”
You can move 1 damage counter either from one of your Pokémon to another of your Pokémon or from one of your teammate’s Pokémon to another of his or her Pokémon. You cannot use this power to move a counter from one of your teammate’s Pokémon to one of yours (or vice versa).
Bill: This Trainer card reads “Draw 2 cards.”
Because there is not a “you” or “your” in this card’s text, you cannot play this card on a teammate, only on yourself.
Double Gust: This Trainer card reads “If you have any Benched Pokémon, your opponent chooses 1 of them and switches it with your Active Pokémon. Then, if your opponent has any Benched Pokémon, choose 1 of them and switch it with his or her Active Pokémon.”
When you play this card, you must first declare which opponent you are using it on. That opponent then gets to decide which Pokémon (yours or your teammate’s) gets switched with that player’s Active Pokémon. Then you would get to decide which of that opponent’s Pokémon gets switched with his or her Active Pokémon.
Entei’s Roar: This Pokémon Power reads “When you play Entei from your hand, you may discard the top 5 cards of your deck. (If you have fewer cards than that, discard all of them.) If any of those cards are {R} Energy cards, attach them to any of your {R} Pokémon of your choice. Using this power ends your turn.”
You can choose to use this Pokémon Power on yourself or on your teammate during your turn. Either way, the person who actually plays the ability (takes it from his or her hand, puts it into play, and decides to use the Pokémon Power) ends his or her turn (whether that player or his or her teammate discarded the cards).
Gengar’s Curse: This Pokémon Power reads “Once during your turn (before your attack), you may move 1 damage counter from 1 of your opponent’s Pokémon to another (even if it would Knock Out the other Pokémon).
You can move a damage counter either from one of your opponent’s Pokémon to another of that same opponent’s Pokémon or move a damage counter from your other opponent’s Pokémon to another of his or her Pokémon. You cannot use this power to move a counter from one opponent’s Pokémon to the other opponent’s Pokémon (or vice versa).
Pokémon Breeder: This Trainer card reads “Put a Stage 2 Evolution card from your hand on the matching Basic Pokémon. You can play this card only when you would be allowed to evolve that Pokémon anyway.”
While it may appear that you may play this card on one of your teammate’s Pokémon, other players cannot normally evolve a Pokémon on your turn. So this card can be played only on yourself in this format.
Pokémon Trader: This Trainer card reads “Trade 1 of the Basic Pokémon or Evolution cards in your hand for 1 of the Basic Pokémon or Evolution cards from your deck. Show both cards to your opponent. Shuffle your deck afterward.”
You can choose to play this card on yourself or on your teammate on your turn. Your teammate must have a Pokémon in his or her hand in order for you to play it on him or her, though.
Professor Elm: This Trainer card reads “Shuffle your hand into your deck. Then, draw 7 cards. You can’t play any more trainer cards this turn.”
You can choose to use this card on yourself or on your teammate during your turn. Either way, the person who actually plays this card (takes it from his or her hand and discards it) cannot play any more Trainer cards that turn (this is a cost).
Time Capsule: This Trainer card reads “Your opponent may choose 5 Basic Pokémon, Evolution, and/or basic Energy cards in his or her discard pile. (If your opponent doesn’t have that many, he or she chooses all or none of them.) If your opponent chooses any cards, he or she shuffles them into his or her deck. Either way, you may do the same, and you can’t play any more Trainer cards this turn.”
When you play this card, you must first declare which opponent has the option to use this card’s ability. After your chosen opponent has done so, you can then choose whether you or your teammate gets to use this card’s ability. Either way, the person who actually plays this card (takes it from his or her hand and discards it) cannot play any more Trainer cards that turn (this is a cost).
Pokémon USA, Inc.

© 2002 Pokémon.

© 1995–2002 Nintendo/Creatures Inc./GAME FREAK inc.

™ & ® Nintendo.



Manufactured and distributed by Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc.

Wizards of the Coast and DCI are trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc.


База данных защищена авторским правом ©shkola.of.by 2016
звярнуцца да адміністрацыі

    Галоўная старонка