Original: Spanish declarations and resolutions adopted by the general assembly




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Promote periodic, independent evaluations of policies, programs and interventions.



Action
a) Design, develop, and strengthen monitoring and evaluation mechanisms which show the progress and fulfillment of programs and other drug interventions that make up national drug policies.

DEMAND REDUCTION
OBJECTIVE No. 1 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Develop and implement comprehensive demand reduction policies, plans and/or programs, as appropriate, that include elements of universal, selective and indicated prevention, early intervention, treatment, rehabilitation and related recovery support services.
Actions
a) Update demand reduction policies, plans and programs based on the results of monitoring and evaluation.
b) Promote and support demand reduction programs and policies that guarantee a multispectral approach to the consumption, abuse and dependence on drugs.
c) Implement demand reduction policies and programs that take into consideration the political and administrative realities of each State.
d) Consider, as appropriate, the guidelines and/or recommendations approved by intergovernmental organizations of which the country is a party/member in the design and implementation of public policies on demand reduction.
OBJECTIVE No. 2 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Develop methods to disseminate information on the risks associated with drug use, through the use of new information technologies and the mass media; and inform the general public and various target populations about available prevention and treatment services.
Actions
a) Generate a database on drug prevention and treatment services available throughout the country and establish mechanisms to ensure that this information is easily accessible.
b) Develop communications strategies and community awareness and sensitization programs on the drug problem.
OBJECTIVE No. 3 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Design and implement a comprehensive system of evidence-based universal, selective, and indicated prevention programs, with measurable objectives, aimed at distinct target populations, including at-risk groups.
Actions
a) Design and conduct needs assessments to identify particular needs and risk and protective factors of specific populations to be targeted with substance abuse prevention programs.
b) Develop tailored interventions and monitoring and evaluation methodologies to address the needs of each target group.
c) Generate opportunities in education and develop skills that promote healthy lifestyles.

OBJECTIVE No. 4 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Incorporate into family, community and workplace prevention programs modes of intervention that address the specific needs of the adult population, paying particular attention to situations such as driving under the influence of drugs and drug-related accidents in the workplace.
Actions
a) Promote collaboration among relevant stakeholders to conduct needs assessments, design interventions, and develop evaluation methodologies for specific adult populations.
b) Develop inter-institutional strategies aimed at preventing drugged driving.
c) Promote actions aimed at preventing drug-related accidents in the workplace.
OBJECTIVE No. 5 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Promote the integration of treatment and recovery plans and programs into the public health system and address drug dependence as a chronic, relapsing disease.
Actions
a) Develop drug treatment programs that are integrated into the public health systems, including, among others, services for screening, brief intervention, and social reintegration as part of treatment.
b) Create and implement coordination mechanisms among the stakeholders involved to improve the implementation of plans and programs that address drug treatment and rehabilitation.
OBJECTIVE No. 6 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Facilitate access for drug-dependent persons to a system of drug treatment, rehabilitation, social reintegration, and recovery services that are evidence-based and follow internationally-accepted quality standards.
Actions
a) Ensure that treatment plans and programs include evidence-based protocols tailored to the needs of different population profiles.
b) Adopt the necessary measures to ensure that drug treatment programs are provided by qualified professionals.
c) Promote information systems on drug treatment that include a register of the number of patients treated diagnoses, clinical history and available information on treatment outcomes.
d) Promote collaboration among all the involved stakeholders to provide support services that foster social reentry as part of treatment in an ongoing and sustainable manner.
e) Develop indicators to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment programs that monitor drug use and incorporate psychosocial variables that are considered relevant to establish the status of recovery.

OBJECTIVE No. 7 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Explore the means of offering treatment, rehabilitation, social reintegration and recovery support services to drug-dependent criminal offenders as an alternative to criminal prosecution or imprisonment.
Actions
a) Consider the possibility of adopting necessary measures to allow for alternatives to prosecution or imprisonment for drug-dependent criminal offenders.
b) Promote the study of other programs that can facilitate the treatment, recovery, and reintegration of drug-dependent criminal offenders.

OBJECTIVE No. 8 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Provide, as far as possible, drug treatment services directed at inmates in correctional facilities.
Action
a) Implement treatment programs in correctional facilities based on documented scientific protocols and minimum quality standards.

OBJECTIVE No. 9 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Strengthen governmental relationships with academic and research institutions and specialized non-governmental organizations (NGOs), in order to generate evidence on the demand for drugs.
Actions
a) Promote and support the inclusion of demand reduction education and research in relevant post-secondary curricula.
b) Establish and/or strengthen the relationship between the National Drug Authorities and academic and research institutions as well as specialized non-governmental organizations (NGOs).
c) Establish or strengthen forums at which drug researchers can present their findings to legislators and policymakers.

OBJECTIVE No. 10 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Promote and strengthen training and continuing education of professionals, technicians and others involved in the implementation of demand reduction activities.

Actions
a) Promote the design and implementation of mechanisms that ensure staff have the necessary competencies to work in drug prevention and treatment programs in accordance with the domestic regulations of each country.

b) Promote collaboration with professional associations, institutions of higher education, and specialized non-governmental organizations (NGOs), among others, with the purpose of promoting programs of continuing education about drug dependence.


OBJECTIVE No. 11 – DEMAND REDUCTION
Monitor and scientifically evaluate drug demand reduction programs.
Actions
a) Develop or strengthen, as appropriate, project monitoring and scientific evaluation mechanisms for demand reduction programs.
b) Carry out training in monitoring and scientific evaluation techniques.
c) Promote agreements with educational institutions with experience in research to conduct long-term studies to measure the impact of prevention and treatment programs.

SUPPLY REDUCTION

OBJECTIVE No. 1 – SUPPLY REDUCTION
Adopt and/or improve comprehensive and balanced measures aimed at reducing the supply of illicit drugs.
Actions
a) Update supply reduction policies, plans and programs based on the results of monitoring and evaluation.
b) In cooperation with civil society, complement supply reduction programs with crime prevention initiatives that address risk factors.

OBJECTIVE No. 2 – SUPPLY REDUCTION
Adopt and/or improve data collection and analysis mechanisms with a view to carrying out assessments that will facilitate the development of public policies aimed at drug supply reduction.

Actions
a) Create and/or strengthen, when necessary, national mechanisms to facilitate the analysis of information on drug supply.
b) Promote the development and sustainability of a hemispheric information system in the area of illicit drug supply within the framework of CICAD, which would ensure the availability of up-to-date data that are, to the extent possible, comparable.
c) Improve capacities to estimate illicit drug cultivation and production, and enable effective eradication through training and the implementation of new technologies.
d) Promote the identification of chemical profiles and characteristics of illicit drugs that will permit an understanding of the dynamics of the supply of drugs.

OBJECTIVE No. 3 – SUPPLY REDUCTION
According to the needs of each country, adopt comprehensive measures, such as integral and sustainable alternative development and law enforcement initiatives.
Actions
a) Develop and implement sustainable and effective measures to reduce illicit crops.
b) Adopt measures as necessary to generate a secure environment that facilitates the implementation of integral and sustainable alternative development programs.
c) Coordinate integral and sustainable alternative development programs with other supply reduction programs and ensure proper sequencing in order to sustain illicit crop reduction.
d) Incorporate an environmental protection component into integral and sustainable alternative development programs.
e) Promote the participation/coordination of civil society and governmental authorities, taking into account the political and administrative organization of the member states, in the design and implementation of projects and initiatives in areas of integral and sustainable alternative development intervention.
f) Promote integral and sustainable alternative development policies and programs that promote social inclusion.
g) Consider the promotion of synergies among integral and sustainable alternative development strategies and poverty reduction programs.
h) Design and/or improve systems to monitor and assess the qualitative and quantitative impact of integral and sustainable alternative development programs with respect to the sustainability of illicit crop reduction.
i) Develop strategies to disseminate the experiences and successes at the community and national levels in the member states.

OBJECTIVE No. 4 – SUPPLY REDUCTION
Promote studies and research that contribute to the early identification and monitoring of new and emerging trends that could provide updated information on the illicit supply of drugs.
Actions
a) Promote the generation of updated statistics at the national and hemispheric levels on illicit drug production and alternative development.
b) Promote studies and research on the illicit production of drugs.
c) Develop mechanisms for the exchange of technical information on new trends in illicit drug production.
d) Carry out situational assessments on illicit drug supply at the national and hemispheric level, to support the decision making process and consider, where appropriate, its interaction with other forms of transnational organized crime.
e) Utilize information on the price and chemical characteristics of raw materials in order to conduct studies on new trends in drug production.
f) Create and/or strengthen national monitoring systems on supply reduction.
OBJECTIVE No. 5 – SUPPLY REDUCTION
Promote actions to reduce the negative impact on the environment caused by the world drug problem, in accordance with national policies.
Actions
a) Promote research or studies on the environmental impact of drug production.
b) Consider promoting the use of environmental management tools to address the consequences of the world drug problem on the environment, in accordance with the realities of member states.
c) Promote measures to ensure the safety of law enforcement agents and other personnel who participate in activities to reduce illicit drug production.
d) Promote the dissemination of information to the general public on the negative environmental consequences of the world drug problem.
e) Promote, when applicable, in accordance with national priorities, actions with international organizations to reduce the negative impact of the world drug problem on the environment.

CONTROL MEASURES
OBJECTIVE No. 1 – CONTROL MEASURES
Implement programs for the prevention and reduction of the illicit production of synthetic and plant-based drugs.
Actions
a) Review control measures to prevent the illicit manufacture of drugs and to detect and dismantle laboratories; on the basis of this review, modify programs or introduce new ones as necessary.
b) Evaluate the results achieved through the implementation of measures and programs aimed at preventing the illicit manufacturing of drugs and the detection and dismantling of laboratories.
c) Develop an information system on laboratories detected and dismantled that will allow, among other things, the identification of patterns in the use of chemical precursors and essential chemical substances.
d) Design and implement protocols for the dismantling of illicit drug processing laboratories.
e) Design and implement training programs on an ongoing basis to enhance the capacities of agents responsible for control activities.
OBJECTIVE No. 2 – CONTROL MEASURES
Adopt or strengthen control measures to prevent the diversion of chemical substances to illicit activities.
Actions
a) Review existing regulations and control measures to prevent the diversion of controlled chemical substances to illicit channels, and, on the basis of this review, modify programs or introduce new ones as necessary.
b) Evaluate the results achieved through the implementation of measures and programs aimed at preventing the diversion of controlled chemical substances to illicit activities.
c) Promote inter-agency coordination among all government agencies and promote the participation of the private sector in the control of chemicals.
d) Promote or strengthen methodologies for risk analysis of diversion in foreign trade transactions.
e) Promote or strengthen the use of non-intrusive inspection equipment at customs.
f) Promote, when applicable, the estimation of legitimate needs for chemical substances to prevent possible diversion.
g) Create or strengthen, as appropriate, research centers and/or laboratories that contribute to the strengthening of control activities for controlled chemical substances.
h) Promote the utilization of pre-export notification information systems.
i) Strengthen the mechanisms for the exchange of secure information among member states concerning possible cases of chemical diversion.

OBJECTIVE No. 3 – CONTROL MEASURES
Adopt or strengthen control measures that prevent the diversion of pharmaceutical products with psychotropic properties to illicit use.
Actions
a) Review existing regulations and control measures to prevent the diversion of pharmaceutical products with psychoactive properties and, on the basis of this review, modify programs or introduce new ones as necessary.
b) Evaluate the results achieved through the implementation of measures and programs aimed at preventing the diversion of pharmaceutical products with psychoactive properties.
c) Promote continuous improvement of information systems that record the movement of pharmaceutical products with psychoactive properties.

OBJECTIVE No. 4 – CONTROL MEASURES
Adopt necessary measures, when appropriate, to prevent the diversion of pharmaceutical products used in the illicit production of amphetamine-type stimulants.
Actions
a) Conduct chemical profiling of seized amphetamine-type stimulants aimed at identifying the pharmaceutical chemicals being used in the production of such substances.
b) Control, when appropriate, products containing pharmaceutical chemicals being used in amphetamine-type stimulant production.

OBJECTIVE No. 5 – CONTROL MEASURES
Ensure the adequate availability of narcotics required for medical and scientific uses.
Action
a) Periodically evaluate the situation with regards to the availability of narcotic drugs for medical and scientific purposes, and implement, as appropriate, required measures.

OBJECTIVE No. 6 – CONTROL MEASURES
Strengthen national organizations for the control of illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
Actions
a) Carry out periodic assessments of the capacities and deficiencies of control organizations for drug trafficking and related crimes.
b) Increase capacities of the organizations that control drug trafficking and related crimes through on-going training of the stakeholders involved.
c) Strengthen cooperation and exchange of information among law enforcement agencies dealing with drug trafficking and related crimes.
d) Strengthen law enforcement and interdiction capacities and effective border control measures to prevent drug trafficking by air, land, or sea.
e) Strengthen technical capacities for the investigation, seizures and forfeitures of assets linked to drug trafficking and related crimes.
f) Develop capacities and legal frameworks needed for the final safe disposal of seized drugs.

OBJECTIVE No. 7 – CONTROL MEASURES
Identify new trends and patterns regarding illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
Actions
a) Conduct and publish national analyses based on available information to identify trends in illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
b) Promote the development of regional analyses based on available information to identify trends in illicit drug trafficking and its related crimes.
c) Promote the development and dissemination of analyses based on national and regional best practices in the prevention and control of illicit drug trafficking and its related crimes.
d) Update national drug control legislation and policy, as pertinent, based on changes in drug trafficking trends and related crimes.
OBJECTIVE No. 8 – CONTROL MEASURES
Promote improvements in information systems on illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
Actions
a) Review the methodologies to validate data on illicit drug trafficking and related crimes, increase the quantity of database variables in order to improve the quality of information, standardize data collection methods, and enrich the analysis.
b) Strengthen information systems on illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
c) Promote and/or strengthen mechanisms for exchanging information in real time which will alert all member states to new behaviors of criminal organizations involved in drug trafficking and related crimes.
d) Promote technical studies and research on illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
e) Promote studies on the impurity profiles and characterization of drugs.
f) Promote the use of information on the price, purity, and chemical profile of seized drugs in order to conduct studies on trends in drug manufacturing and trafficking.
OBJECTIVE No. 9 – CONTROL MEASURES
Adopt measures for effective cooperation in criminal investigations, investigation procedures, collection of evidence, and the exchange of intelligence information among countries, assuring due respect for the various national legal systems.
Actions
a) Design and implement specialized training workshops which demonstrate the parameters and advantages of the exchange of intelligence information in investigations of cases related to illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
b) Strengthen mechanisms and/or take the actions needed for the secure and effective exchange of intelligence information in cases related to illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
c) Promote actions aimed at preserving the integrity of intelligence information exchanged on drug trafficking and related crimes.
d) Promote the exchange of information in order to facilitate the interdiction of illegal drug trafficking via air, maritime and land conveyances.
e) Promote the exchange of information in order to facilitate investigations of illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
f) Design and implement specialized training workshops on the application of special investigative techniques and the handling of custody chains of evidence in cases of illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
g) Promote the strengthening of the control, prevention, research and monitoring activities related to drug trafficking through the internet while ensuring coordinated international action to ensure effective exchange of information, experiences and best practices.

OBJECTIVE No. 10 – CONTROL MEASURES
Adopt or strengthen, where appropriate, control measures for the illicit trafficking of firearms, munitions, explosives and other related materials associated with illicit drug trafficking.
Actions
a) Review control measures for the illicit trafficking of weapons, munitions, explosives and other related materials associated with illicit drug trafficking; on the basis of this review, modify programs or introduce new ones as necessary.
b) Evaluate the results achieved through the implementation of control measures for the illicit trafficking of weapons, munitions, explosives and other related materials associated with illicit drug trafficking.
c) Promote the creation and /or strengthening of databases for firearms linked to illicit drug trafficking that would include, whenever possible, ballistics identification information, with a view to promoting hemispheric mechanisms for information exchange.
OBJECTIVE No. 11 – CONTROL MEASURES
Establish, update or strengthen legislative and institutional frameworks in matters of prevention, detection, investigation, prosecution and control of money laundering.
Actions
a) Review legislative and institutional frameworks in matters of prevention, detection, investigation, prosecution and control of money laundering; on the basis of this review, modify programs or introduce new ones as necessary.
b) Evaluate the results achieved through the implementation of legislative and institutional measures for the prevention, detection, investigation, prosecution and control of money laundering.
c) Create or strengthen financial intelligence units to foster successful anti-money laundering prosecutions.
d) Create or strengthen mechanisms of cooperation and exchange of information among agencies enforcing laws on the prevention and control of money laundering.

OBJECTIVE No. 12 – CONTROL MEASURES
Create or strengthen, in accordance with national legislation, the competent national organizations for the administration of seized and/or forfeited assets, and the disposition of forfeited assets.
Actions
a) Establish/strengthen national organizations with responsibility for the administration of seized and/or forfeited assets, and the disposition of forfeited assets.
b) Promote specialized programs to improve systems for the administration of seized and forfeited assets.
c) Strengthen technical capacities for the administration and disposition of assets related to drug trafficking and related crimes.
INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
OBJECTIVE No. 1 – INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
Reaffirm the principle of cooperation contained in international instruments to address the world drug problem, through actions to ensure compliance and effectiveness.
Actions
a) Promote the enactment of national legislation and/or adopt administrative measures that would reaffirm the principle of cooperation as contained in international instruments to confront the world drug problem.
b) Promote, through the Inter-Governmental Working Group (IWG) of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM), the development of evaluation instruments for monitoring the principle of cooperation as contained in international instruments.
c) Promote, when appropriate, the signing of bi-lateral or regional cooperation agreements to address the world drug problem.
OBJECTIVE No. 2 – INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
Stress the importance of ratifying, acceding to and complying with, as appropriate, the following conventions: The United Nations Convention against Corruption (2003); the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (2000) and its three protocols: the Protocol Against the Smuggling of Migrants by Land, Sea and Air, the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, and the Protocol Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, their Parts and Components and Ammunition; the Inter-American Convention Against Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives and Other Related Materials (CIFTA) (1997); the Inter-American Convention Against Corruption (1996); the Inter-American Convention on Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters (1992); the United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (1988); the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs (1961), amended by the 1972 Protocol, and the United Nations Convention on Psychotropic Substances (1971). Member states also recognize the importance of observing the agreements reached in the Political Declaration on the World Drug Problem adopted by the 20th United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs in 1998, and the Political Declaration and Plan of Action on International Cooperation towards an Integrated and Balanced Strategy to Counter the World Drug Problem (Vienna, 2009).
Actions
a) Emphasize the importance of ratifying or acceding to those international treaties listed above.
b) Promote the necessary actions for compliance with international treaties that have been ratified or acceded to.
OBJECTIVE No. 3 – INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
Promote international cooperation programs aimed at strengthening national policies to address the world drug problem, based on the needs of individual member states.
Actions
a) Mandate that the Executive Secretariat of CICAD conduct and appropriately disseminate an inventory of international cooperation programs in the area of drug control that are currently being carried out by States and international organizations.
b) Promote the participation of member states in international cooperation programs to strengthen their national policies to address the world drug problem based on their individual needs.
OBJECTIVE No. 4 – INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
Promote the harmonization of national laws, regulations and procedures that enable the implementation of hemispheric mechanisms for judicial cooperation and mutual legal assistance in the field of drug trafficking and related crimes.
Actions
a) Promote, through the Inter-Governmental Working Group (IWG) of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM), the development of evaluation instruments for monitoring measures to implement commitments in the Conventions on judicial assistance in criminal matters.
b) Consider, as appropriate, the adoption of judicial cooperation measures that would facilitate the provision of the widest possible range of mutual legal assistance.
OBJECTIVE No. 5 – INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
Strengthen the institutional capacity of member states to prevent and effectively address drug trafficking, recognizing the details of the challenges, harms, and negative impacts faced by the producing, transit and consumer countries, through the promotion and strengthening of joint or coordinated operations and exchange of information and best practices.
Actions
a) Promote, as necessary, joint or coordinated operations and the exchange of information and good practices to prevent and effectively address illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
b) Promote, through the Inter-Governmental Working Group (IWG) of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM), the development of evaluation instruments to monitor the promotion and strengthening of joint or coordinated operations and the exchange of information and good practices.
c) Promote the development of a good practices manual on joint or coordinated operations to counter illicit drug trafficking and its related crimes.
d) Promote the development and implementation of secure mechanisms for the exchange of information in real time to enable advances in cooperation to prevent and combat illicit trafficking in drugs and related crimes.
e) Promote the development of mechanisms among applicable agencies and institutions, when possible, for the use of compatible information related to police actions aimed at combating illicit drug trafficking and related crimes.
OBJECTIVE No. 6 – INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
Encourage and promote technical assistance and exchange of good practices and lessons learned to address the world drug problem in the areas of institution building, demand reduction, supply reduction and control measures.
Actions
a) Mandate the Executive Secretariat of CICAD to develop and implement a secure and up-to-date internet data base to disseminate current information on best practices in the areas of institution building, demand reduction, supply reduction, control measures and international cooperation.
b) Mandate the Executive Secretariat of CICAD to publish legislation of the member states in the areas of institutional strengthening, demand reduction, supply reduction, and control measures.
c) Strengthen technical horizontal cooperation among countries as well as through pertinent international organizations.
OBJECTIVE No. 7 – INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
Strengthen the CICAD’s institutional capacity to promote international cooperation aimed at implementing the recommendations emanating from the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM) process, as well as the objectives set out in the Hemispheric Drug Strategy and this Action Plan.
Actions
a) Promote technical assistance, financing, and training to facilitate compliance with the recommendations formulated under the framework of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM).
b) Mandate the Executive Secretariat of CICAD to publish a historical report on the resources of the CICAD Executive Secretariat since the Commission’s founding, including a detailed accounting of funding sources, which programs have been conducted and their status, and the general achievements of completed projects and programs sponsored under the CICAD umbrella.
c) Mandate the Executive Secretariat of CICAD to present a work plan for Commission approval at each spring session that is in accordance with the objectives and actions of the Hemispheric Drug Strategy and this Action Plan. This work plan will be accompanied by a projection of income and expenditure for each program and action.4/
d) Mandate the Executive Secretariat to present an annual report on all sources of funding and expenditures for programs and actions in accordance with the work plan approved by the Commission.
e

) Promote the formation of a special CICAD working group to evaluate the availability of resources of the CICAD Executive Secretariat and propose additional sources of funding.

AG/RES. 2622 (XLI-O/11)

MULTILATERAL EVALUATION MECHANISM


OF THE INTER-AMERICAN DRUG ABUSE CONTROL COMMISSION
(Adopted at the fourth plenary session, held on June 7, 2011)

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY,


HAVING SEEN Resolution AG/RES. 2538 XL-O/10) Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission;
REAFFIRMING the Declaration of Commitment of Port of Spain, whereby the countries pledged to continue implementing, as appropriate, and the recommendations of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism; 5/
HAVING SEEN the approval by the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) at its forty-eighth regular session of the 33 national reports of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM) of the Fifth Evaluation Round 2007-2009;
HAVING ALSO SEEN the approval of the Hemispheric Report of the MEM Fifth Evaluation Round, in its forty-ninth regular session;
REITERATING the importance of having current strategies and mechanisms to facilitate hemispheric cooperation to address the world drug problem in all its aspects;
TAKING NOTE of the decision made by CICAD to carry out, in preparation for the Sixth Round of the MEM, a study to identify alternatives to strengthen the evaluation process and update it with respect to the Hemispheric Drug Strategy and the Hemispheric Plan of Action on Drugs 2011-2015; and
REAFFIRMING that the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism is the appropriate instrument to measure member states’ progress in drug control in the hemisphere and to assign recommendations designed to strengthen their capacity to address the world drug problem,
RESOLVES:
1. To note with satisfaction the approval by the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the 33 national reports of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM) of the Fifth Evaluation Round 2007-2009, at the Forty-Eighth regular session of the Commission.
2. To also note with satisfaction the approval by CICAD of the Hemispheric Report of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism of the Fifth Evaluation Round 2007-2009, at the Forty Ninth regular session of the Commission.

3. To encourage member states to implement the recommendations assigned by the MEM in the national reports on progress in drug control.


4. To invite member states to continue to participate actively in the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism during the follow-up phase of the Fifth Evaluation Round and in the preparatory process for the Sixth Round.
5. To further invite member states to strengthen the role of the National Coordinating Entities (NCEs) and facilitate the participation of their experts in meetings of the MEM’s Governmental Expert Group (GEG) in order to guarantee the effectiveness and validity of the MEM.

6. Encourage member States to, when possible, make voluntary contributions to support the MEM and guarantee its continuity and strengthening.


7. To urge member states to comply with the requirements stemming from their participation in the Mechanism, particularly regarding the submission of information for the work of the GEG, in order to ensure a proper assessment of progress made in controlling the world drug problem.

8. To entrust CICAD with the adoption of the actions necessary to commence the Sixth Round of the MEM.




  1. T

    o encourage member states to disseminate the MEM reports on progress in drug control.


10. That the execution of the activities provided for in this resolution shall be subject to the availability of financial resources in the program-budget of the Organization and other resources.


FOOTNOTE
1

. Nicaragua expressed its view that the Declaration of the Fifth Summit of the Americas was unacceptable and inadequate as it did not resolve a number of matters that were extremely important for the Hemisphere and were still under discussion.  Nor does Nicaragua accept that references may be made to that Declaration in the resolutions to be adopted by the OAS General Assembly.  Nicaragua reaffirms that the items on the General Assembly agenda should be derived from the debates and deliberations of the Heads of State and Government in Trinidad and Tobago.


AG/RES. 2623 (XLI-O/11)

MODEL LEGISLATION ON SELF-PROPELLED SUBMERSIBLE
AND SEMI-SUBMERSIBLE VESSELS
(Adopted at the fourth plenary session, held on June 7, 2011)

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY,


HAVING SEEN:
The Observations and Recommendations of the Permanent Council on the annual reports of the organs, agencies and entities of the Organization of American States (OAS), submitted in compliance with Article 91.f. of the Charter (AG/doc.3830/99 add. 2), and in particular those relating to the Annual Report of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) (CP/doc.4559/11);
The Model Legislation on Self-Propelled Submersible and Semi-Submersible Vessels, approved by the Commission at its forty-ninth regular session, held in Paramaribo, Suriname, May 4-6, 2011 (CICAD/doc.1891/11 corr. 1); and
The Final Report of the forty-ninth regular session of the Commission held in Paramaribo, Suriname, May 4-6, 2011 (CICAD/doc.1892/11);
CONSIDERING:
That the CICAD Groups of Experts are open to all member states, providing an opportunity to share experience, present initiatives, and promote cooperation;
That the above-mentioned Model Legislation of CICAD is an important tool in the development of a coordinated response to illicit drug trafficking and related offenses;
That the said Model Legislation of CICAD depends upon the input and expertise of the experts of the member states; and
That the Commission has approved the above-mentioned Model Legislation,
RESOLVES:
1. To note with satisfaction CICAD’s approval of the Model Legislation on Self-Propelled Submersible and Semi-Submersible Vessels at its forty-ninth regular session, held in Paramaribo, Suriname, May 4-6, 2011 (CICAD/doc.1892/11).
2. To endorse CICAD’s Model Legislation on Self-Propelled Submersible and Semi-Submersible Vessels (CICAD/doc.1891/11corr. 1) set out in Appendix I, together with the editorial changes of the Model Legislation.
3. To invite the member states to adopt CICAD’s Model Legislation on Self-Propelled Submersible and Semi-Submersible Vessels, when appropriate, in accordance with their national law.

APPENDIX I




FORTY-NINTH REGULAR SESSION

May 4 - 6, 2011

Paramaribo, Suriname

OEA/Ser.L/XIV.2.49

CICAD/doc.1891/11 corr. 1

17 May 2011

Original: Spanish


DRAFT MODEL SELF-PROPELLED SUBMERSIBLE AND SEMI-SUBMERSIBLE VESSEL LEGISLATION

PREAMBLE
The language in this document is non-binding. Its purpose is to provide model language for countries to consider if they decide to draft legislation to counter the threat posed by submersible vessels and semi-submersible vessels without nationality. Any country choosing to use this document should select language from it as may be applicable for their situation and circumstances, and which is consistent with their constitution and laws. A country may choose to use all, some or none of this language as best suits their national needs.
Drug trafficking affects every country in the hemisphere, and has become a global problem. The robust steps taken by the security forces of different countries has led drug trafficking organizations to change their modus operandi to now include using self-propelled submersible and semisubmersible vessels, or naval artifacts towed by mother ships, to move narcotics by sea.
Self-propelled submersible and semisubmersible vessels are watercraft of unorthodox construction capable of putting all or much of their bulk under the surface of the water, making them extremely difficult to detect. These vessels are typically less than 30 meters in length, carry a crew of 4-5, as much as 12 tons of cargo, typically contraband, and can travel at speeds up to 13 knots with a range of more than two thousand kilometers.
The characteristics of these vessels greatly hamper detection by the authorities. Their design enables criminals to easily destroy their illicit cargo upon detection, usually by scuttling the vessel or contraband, thereby preventing their prosecution due to the lack of evidence. The ease and speed of scuttling makes attempts to access and recover contraband before a scuttled vessel sinks a very dangerous and often impossible task for law enforcement officers.
The problem that this rising drug-trafficking trend represents for countries of the region is reflected in the amount of personnel, material, funds and equipment each applies, in spite of excellent coordination of all available resources, including intelligence, operations centers, and surface and air units. Criminalizing the construction, operation of and embarkation upon unflagged submersible and semisubmersible vessels improves officer safety, deters the use of these inherently unsafe vessels, and facilitates effective prosecution of those involved in criminal activities.
ARTICLE 1. FINDINGS AND DECLARATIONS
[Parliament/Congress/Legislature/Government of (Country)] finds and declares that constructing, embarking upon, utilizing, or operating a submersible vessel or semi-submersible vessel without nationality is a serious international problem, facilitates transnational crime, including drug trafficking among others, and presents a specific threat to the safety of maritime navigation and the security of (country). This law applies to any type of artifact that is not destined to be used as touristic, scientific, or for any other legal activity.
Definition6/: Applicable to this Law, a submersible vessel or semisubmersible vessel is a vessel capable of moving in the water with or without self-propulsion, and whose characteristics or design allow for total or partial immersion for the purpose of avoiding detection7.
ARTICLE 2. OPERATION OF SUBMERSIBLE OR SEMI-SUBMERSIBLE VESSEL WITHOUT NATIONALITY


  1. Offense: Whoever, without permission from a competent authority, operates or embarks in a submersible vessel or semi-submersible vessel that is without nationality shall be fined [amount], imprisoned from (X months) to (X years), or both. Whoever attempts or conspires to commit any of the acts described in this section shall be fined (amount), imprisoned from (X months) to (X years), or both;8 /




  1. Aggravating Circumstances: Whoever utilizes a submersible vessel or semi-submersible vessel to store, transport, or sell narcotic substances or consumables required to manufacture narcotic substances shall be fined (amount), imprisoned from (X months) to (X years), or both. The penalty shall be increased by (fill in details) when the illegal actions are facilitated by a public official or anyone who is or has been a member of the security forces.


ARTICLE 3. USAGE, CONSTRUCTION, COMMERCE AND POSSESSION OF SUBMERSIBLE OR SEMI-SUBMERSIBLE VESSEL


  1. Offense: Whoever, without permission from a competent authority, finances, constructs, or purchases a submersible vessel or semi-submersible vessel shall be fined [amount], imprisoned from (X months) to (X years), or both. Whoever attempts or conspires to commit any of the acts described in this section shall be fined (amount), imprisoned from (X months) to (X years], or both;




  1. Aggravating Circumstances: Whomever provides the conditions for usage and operation of a submersible vessel or semi-submersible vessel in an illegal activity shall be fined [amount], imprisoned from (X months) to (X years), or both.

ARTICLE 4. EXTRATERRITORIAL JURISDICTION (COULD BE APPLIED DEPENDING ON THE LAWS AND CONSTITUTION OF EACH COUNTRY)
There is extraterritorial jurisdiction over an offense under this section, including an attempt or conspiracy to commit such an offense.9/
ARTICLE 5. CLAIM OF NATIONALITY OR REGISTRY FOR THE VESSEL
A claim of nationality or registry under Articles 2 and 3 includes only:


  1. P

    ossession on board the vessel and production of documents evidencing the vessel’s nationality as provided in article 91 of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) ;10/



  2. Flying its nation’s ensign or flag; or

  3. A verbal claim of nationality or registry by the master or individual in charge of the vessel.

AG/RES. 2624 (XLI-O/11)

CONSOLIDATION OF THE REGIME ESTABLISHED IN THE TREATY FOR THE PROHIBITION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN (TREATY OF TLATELOLCO)


(Adopted at the fourth plenary session, held on June 7, 2011)

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY,


HAVING SEEN the Annual Report of the Permanent Council to the General Assembly, in particular the section on the Committee on Hemispheric Security (AG/doc.5217/11);
RECALLING resolutions AG/RES. 1499 (XXVII-O/97), AG/RES. 1571 (XXVIII-O/98), AG/RES. 1622 (XXIX-O/99), AG/RES. 1748 (XXX-O/00), AG/RES. 1798 (XXXI-O/01), AG/RES. 1903 (XXXII-O/02), AG/RES. 1937 (XXXIII-O/03), AG/RES. 2009 (XXXIV-O/04), AG/RES. 2104 (XXXV-O/05), AG/RES. 2245 (XXXVI-O/06), AG/RES. 2298 (XXXVII-O/07), AG/RES. 2377 (XXXVIII-O/08), and AG/RES. 2442 (XXXIX-O/09);
BEARING IN MIND that the Declaration on Security in the Americas affirmed that the establishment of the first nuclear-weapon-free zone in a densely populated area through the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Treaty of Tlatelolco) and the protocols thereto constitutes a substantial contribution to international peace, security, and stability;
REAFFIRMING that the consolidation of the nuclear-weapon-free zone set forth in the Treaty of Tlatelolco constitutes a firm demonstration of the steadfast commitment of Latin America and the Caribbean to the cause of complete and verifiable nuclear disarmament and the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, in keeping with the principles and purposes of the Charter of the United Nations;
RECALLING that the preamble to the Treaty of Tlatelolco states that militarily denuclearized zones are not an end in themselves, but rather a means for achieving general and complete disarmament at a later stage;
RECOGNIZING that the Treaty of Tlatelolco has become the model for the establishment of other nuclear-weapon-free zones in various regions of the world, such as the South Pacific (Treaty of Rarotonga), Southeast Asia (Treaty of Bangkok), Africa (Treaty of Pelindaba), and Central Asia (Treaty of Semipalatinsk), which, when they enter into force, will cover more than half the countries of the world and all territories in the Southern Hemisphere;
CONVINCED that internationally recognized nuclear-weapon-free zones are making an important contribution to the international disarmament and nonproliferation regime as well as to the maintenance of international peace and security;
CONSIDERING that, under Article 1 of the Treaty of Tlatelolco, the Contracting Parties undertook “to use exclusively for peaceful purposes the nuclear material and facilities which are under their jurisdiction”;
REAFFIRMING the importance of strengthening the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL) as the appropriate legal and political forum for ensuring the full force and effect of the Treaty of Tlatelolco, as well as cooperation with the agencies of other nuclear-weapon-free zones, in order to achieve their common objectives;
WELCOMING the organization of the Second Conference of States Parties and Signatories of Treaties that Establish Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones and Mongolia, which was held in New York City on April 30, 2010, as a contribution toward bringing about a world free of nuclear weapons;
NOTING the Final Document of the 2010 Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; and
TAKING NOTE of the results of the meeting of the Committee on Hemispheric Security on disarmament and nonproliferation in the Hemisphere held on March 28, 2011, and of the seminar organized by the Inter-American Defense Board, through the Inter-American Defense College, held on March 28 to 30, 2011,
RESOLVES:


  1. To call upon those states of the region that have not yet done so to sign or ratify the amendments to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Treaty of Tlatelolco), adopted by the General Conference of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL) in resolutions 267 (E-V), 268 (XII), and 290 (E-VII).




  1. To urge those states that have ratified the relevant protocols to the Treaty of Tlatelolco to examine the reservations they made thereto, in compliance with Action 9 of the Final Document of the 2010 Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.




  1. To urge the member states of the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (OPANAL) to continue with the activities and efforts undertaken by that agency to enforce the agreements reached at the First and Second Conferences of States Parties and Signatories of Treaties that Establish Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones.




  1. To reaffirm its commitment to continue striving for a disarmament and nonproliferation regime that is universal, genuine, and nondiscriminatory in every aspect.




  1. To call upon OPANAL to continue, in its area of competence, to maintain ongoing contact with the Committee on Hemispheric Security and to report to it periodically on the fulfillment of the commitments undertaken by the states of the region in the Declaration on Security in the Americas, in particular, paragraph 11 thereof, as they pertain to nonproliferation of nuclear weapons.




  1. To recognize the work of OPANAL in ensuring compliance with the obligations undertaken in the Treaty of Tlatelolco.




  1. To invite OPANAL to continue to educate and disseminate information on nuclear disarmament.




  1. To include the topic “Consolidation of the Regime Established in the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Treaty of Tlatelolco)” on the Committee on Hemispheric Security’s schedule of activities for 2012-2013 period.




  1. T
    o request the Secretary General to forward this resolution to the Secretary-General of the United Nations and to the Secretary General of OPANAL.




  1. The execution of the activities foreseen in this resolution shall be subject to the availability of financial resources in the program-budget of the Organization and other resources.




  1. To ask the Permanent Council to report to the General Assembly on the implementation of this resolution at its forty-second and forty-third regular sessions.

AG/RES. 2625 (XLI-O/11)

CONFIDENCE- AND SECURITY-BUILDING IN THE AMERICAS
(Adopted at the fourth plenary session, held on June 7, 2011)

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY,


HAVING SEEN the Annual Report of the Permanent Council to the General Assembly (AG/doc.5217/11), in particular the section on the activities of the Committee on Hemispheric Security (CSH);
BEARING IN MIND that in the Declaration on Security in the Americas the member states affirmed that “[c]onfidence- and security-building measures and transparency in defense and security policies contribute to increasing stability, safeguarding hemispheric and international peace and security, and consolidating democracy,” and recommended that the CSH meet periodically as the “Forum for Confidence- and Security-Building Measures” in order to review and evaluate existing confidence- and security-building measures and, if appropriate, consider new measures that would make it possible to ensure progress in this area;
RECOGNIZING that confidence- and security-building measures (CSBMs) developed and implemented in the Hemisphere have helped enhance security and fostered cooperation and trust among the states of the Hemisphere;

TAKING INTO ACCOUNT that the Organization of American States (OAS) may further advance the progress achieved to date by continuing to promote confidence- and security-building measures (CSBMs);


TAKING INTO ACCOUNT that resolutions AG/RES. 2447 (XXXIX-O/09), AG/RES. 2398 (XXXVIII-O/08), and AG/RES. 2270 (XXXVII-O/07), “Confidence- and Security-Building in the Americas,” contain a series of recommendations and mandates directed at the member states and the General Secretariat;
TAKING NOTE of the recommendations contained in the Declaration of Santiago and the Declaration of San Salvador on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures and in the Consensus of Miami: Declaration by the Experts on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures;
EXPRESSING SATISFACTION with the results of the Fourth Meeting of the Forum on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures held on November 15 and 16, 2010, in Lima, Peru; and
BEARING IN MIND the Conclusions of the Chair of the Fourth Meeting of the Forum on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures, contained in document CSH/Foro-IV/doc.13/10 rev. 1, and the Rapporteur’s Report, contained in document CSH/FORO-IV/doc.15/10 rev. 1,
RESOLVES:


  1. To continue to encourage and implement confidence- and security-building measures (CSBMs) in keeping with the provisions of the Declarations of San Salvador and Santiago on CSBMs, the Consensus of Miami, and the Declaration on Security in the Americas.




  1. To call upon all member states to furnish by July 15 of each year information to the General Secretariat on the implementation of CSBMs, utilizing the “Consolidated List of Confidence- and Security-Building Measures,” in accordance with OAS resolutions (document CP/CSH-1043/08 rev. 1), and using the “Format for Reporting on the Application of Confidence- and Security-Building Measures” (document CSH/Foro-IV/doc.7/10).




  1. To reaffirm the goal of participation by all member states, by 2010, in the United Nations (UN) Register of Conventional Arms and the UN Standardized International Reporting of Military Expenditures; and to renew its request that member states provide said information to the Secretary General of the Organization of American States by July 15 of each year.




  1. To urge member states to share bilateral and subregional experiences relating to CSBMs at seminars, workshops, and other hemispheric fora in order to encourage the dissemination of best practices, avoid duplication, and help standardize, where appropriate, reporting on CSBMs.




  1. To request the Committee on Hemispheric Security (CSH) to establish criteria and guidelines for the selection of experts on confidence- and security-building measures, including a description of the experts’ profile.




  1. To request the CSH to continue promoting increased transparency, trust, dialogue, and cooperation to address threats, concerns, and other challenges to hemispheric security.




  1. To request the OAS General Secretariat to promote and enhance access to the OAS websites and those of its entities devoted to confidence- and security-building measures, in particular those concerned with the principal international instruments and reporting by member states in this area, and publication of the defense white papers compiled by the Inter-American Defense Board.




  1. To instruct the Permanent Council to convene the Fifth Meeting of the Forum on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures for the last quarter of 2012, to review and evaluate existing CSBMs and to discuss, consider, and propose new CSBMs.




  1. To request the General Secretariat to update the Roster of Experts on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures every year, on the basis of the information supplied by the member states by July 1 each year, and to distribute the new roster to member states by July 30 of each year.




  1. To request the Secretary General to forward this resolution to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, the Secretary General of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), the Association of South-East Asian Nations Regional Forum (ARF), and other pertinent regional organizations.




  1. To request the Permanent Council and the General Secretariat to report to the General Assembly at its forty-second regular session on the implementation of this resolution. Execution of the activities envisaged in this resolution will be subject to the availability of financial resources in the program-budget of the Organization and other resources.

AG/RES. 2626 (XLI-O/11)




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