Oklahoma State Department of Education




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Initiative #2: Conduct effective high quality

professional development activities.
Oklahoma State Department of Education

Title II, Part A Plan

High Quality Professional Development
Performance Goal 3: By 2005-2006, all students will be taught by highly qualified teachers.
Performance Indicator 3.2: The percentage of teachers receiving high-quality professional development (as the term, “professional development,” is defined in section 9101(34).)
Performance Target: The target percentages of teachers receiving high-quality professional development will be 40% in 2003-2004; 75% in 2004-2005; and 100% in 2005-2006. Revised Performance Target is 90% in 2005-2006 and 100% in 2006-2007 for all teachers, including special education teachers.
Oklahoma High Quality Professional Development will:


  • Provide teachers, principals, and administrators the knowledge and skills to provide students with the opportunity to learn the state academic content standards, Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS).

  • Improve and increase teachers’ knowledge of the academic subjects they teach.

  • Advance teacher understanding of effective instructional strategies that are based on scientifically based research.

  • Increase teachers’ knowledge of how to modify the curriculum to meet the needs of individual learners.

  • Develop teacher leaders that will take the role of sharing knowledge and effective practices with teachers.


Requirement 3: The revised plan must include information on the technical assistance, programs, and services that the SEA will offer to assist LEAs to successfully completing their HQT plans (Attachment H), particularly where large groups of teachers are not highly qualified and the resources the LEAs will use to meet their HQT goals.
3.1 Does the plan include a description of the technical assistance the SEA will provide to assist LEAs in successfully carrying out their HQT plans?
REVISED INFORMATION
Oklahoma has consistently made ongoing and comprehensive efforts to assure that all districts have a clear understanding of the highly qualified teacher requirements and that districts understand how to support all teachers in core academic subjects to meet the highly qualified requirements. Oklahoma provides

targeted district-based technical assistance including on-site visits by Regional Accreditation Officers and School Improvement Division monitoring teams, as well as, e-mail and phone assistance to address highly qualified teacher issues and inquiries. Ongoing technical assistance to districts in successfully carrying out their highly qualified teacher plans is provided by OSDE teams. The OSDE divisions work as a team to provide this technical assistance. These OSDE divisions include: The Office of Grants Planning, the Office of Grants Management, and the Curriculum Office of the School Improvement Division, the Special Education Division, the Professional Standards and Certification Division and the Accreditation Division team to provide technical assistance.
The Office of Grants Planning will review all highly qualified teacher plans in a timely manner by OSDE staff and feedback to districts will occur prior to second semester, so that the districts can implement strategies outlined in their plan at the beginning of second semester.
Targeted technical assistance will occur for high-poverty, high-minority low-performing schools including the following areas:


  • Assist districts with the process to determine a teacher’s highly qualified status and how to utilize the Oklahoma Credentialing System Highly Qualified component to streamline the process;




  • Provide guidance for NCLB highly qualified requirements (sent to all districts and provided on OSDE Web site);




  • Provide assistance to districts in research-based strategies to recruit and retain highly qualified teachers;




  • Provide assistance to resolve specific highly qualified teacher issues including appropriate use of HOUSSE;




  • Identify appropriate strategies to help teachers become highly qualified;




  • Provide districts with information about state and regional professional development options to assist teachers in becoming highly qualified.


The technical assistance provided to districts will focus on the 7.13% of classes taught by non-highly qualified teachers. See Section 2.3 for timeline and technical assistance strategies. This will include assisting special education teachers that need content professional development; technical assistance to complete HOUSSE; support and professional development to assist teachers in passing subject tests.


  • OSDE sent letters to superintendents about new standards related to using HOUSSE for veteran special education teachers and strategies in July, 2006 (Attachment A).




  • OSDE provided professional development from Dr. Marilyn Friend, Co-Teaching: Principles, Practices, and Pragmatics to 2,000 special educators on September 6th and 7th, 2006.




  • OSDE plans to purchase Dr. Friend’s DVD to distribute to all districts. This DVD provides the interactive presentation related to effective research-based strategies for co-teaching. This will be purchased with Special Education funds and Title II, Part A funds before second semester of the 2006-2007 year.




  • OSDE has scheduled Dr. Friend to return next September, 2007 to continue and sustain the professional development for co-teaching and collaboration of special education teachers and core content teachers.




  • The Regional Accreditation Officers will verify highly qualified status as reported by districts during their onsite visits.




  • The new Oklahoma Web-based Educator Credentialing System (OECS) will verify teacher quality data.


A contract issued in June 2006, for the 2006-07 development of an Oklahoma Web-based Educator Credentialing System (OECS), will provide essential data on teachers (areas of certification, subject test results, degree, major, and National Board Certification), in a relational database than can be easily linked with other teachers systems that provide key information affecting equality: systems such as School Personnel Records, (location and type of school), Teacher Class Schedules (subject and number of students taught) and Accreditation (demographics of student population). Oklahoma’s improved capacity to accurately assess the highly qualified status of teachers in each school will provide a solid foundation for the future identification, analyses and plan for correction, of the distribution inequity of quality teachers between high-poverty/high-minority schools vs. low-poverty/low-minority schools.
Oklahoma has developed and implemented an online grant consolidated application used by all districts. Within the district consolidated application, the district must address Performance Indicator 3.1, the percentage of classes being taught by highly qualified teachers and must provide specific targets and strategies to and programs to carry out their highly qualified teacher plans.
Oklahoma State Department of Education directors and program specialists use the following initiatives to provide districts with technical assistance as follows:
3.1.1 Professional Development


  • Conduct annual videoconferences to explain highly qualified requirements and provide information about resources for ensuring all core content teachers meet the highly qualified requirements.



  • Conduct annual highly qualified professional development and provide information about resources for teachers to meet the highly qualified requirement including but not limited to: Teacher – Teacher Initiative and state teacher testing information for core content areas.




  • Baseline data, targets and actual percentage of teachers who received “high-quality professional development” is listed below as reported in the Oklahoma Accreditation report.



Baseline Data and Targets

Target Percentage of Teachers Receiving High-Quality Professional Development

Actual Percentage of Teachers Receiving High-Quality Professional Development

2002-2003 Baseline

Data not available




2003-2004 Target

40

98.6

2004-2005 Target

75

98.4

2005-2006 Target

100

98.5


Baseline data on the number of teachers completing high quality professional development is compiled and reported annually.
3.1.2 Technology


  • Collaborate with Data Services to ensure accurate and complete highly qualified data at the district and school levels is collected.




  • Maintain current highly qualified information and updated documents that provide increased understanding of highly qualified teacher requirements on the OSDE Web site – NCLB page.




  • The Oklahoma Special Education Division in collaboration with PASSport II, has developed video vignettes available during 2006-2007 school year, illustrating accommodations and modifications being provided in classrooms and collaboration between regular education and special education teachers. Theses are available to download from OSDE Web site.


3.1.3 Monitoring
Teams of program specialists will monitor in 2006-2007 schools that do not have 100% of core content classes taught by highly qualified teachers as reported in 2005-06. Monitoring will occur in the following ways:


  • Onsite monitoring for all districts that have 21% or more classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified will occur. In addition, the two largest districts in Oklahoma with 44,000+ students in each will be monitored. These districts have high poverty and high minority student populations. Additional districts will be monitored as part of Oklahoma’s five year cycle to monitor its 540 districts.




  • District and individual teacher plans are required to be submitted by November 17, 2006 to provide:




    1. specific activities that will be completed by the teacher to reach highly qualified status by the most efficient option;

    2. specific actions to be taken by the District to facilitate the process;

    3. specific financial assistance and/or other support that will be provided by the District.


Priorities for schools are set using the following scale and will be

used for Title II monitoring.
Priority 1 includes 5 districts where percent of teachers who are not HQ is 21% or higher.

Priority 2 includes 22 districts where percent of teachers who are not HQ is greater than or equal to 16% and less than 21%

Priority 3 includes 80 districts where percent of teachers who are not HQ is greater than or equal to 10% and less than 16%
3.1.4 Continual Technical Assistance


  • Professional Standards and Certification Office; Special Education Office; Accreditation Office; Data Services Office and Office of Standards and Curriculum (includes Title II and Title I) consistently respond to inquiries from teachers and districts in a timely manner.




  • Respond to administrators and teachers via telephone, e-mail, and in-person with information specific to their needs for becoming highly qualified.




  • Provide information related to exam information and preparation for exams administered by Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation.




  • Provide USDE guidance and information to district federal program administrators and district superintendents and principals.




  • Provide highly qualified and certification updates regularly to district administrators.


3.2 Does the plan indicate that the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP will be given high priority?
REVISED INFORMATION

OSDE has analyzed the data on highly qualified teachers as well as data from schools and districts identified in need of improvement. All districts that have not reached 100 percent goal of all core academic classes taught by highly qualified teachers and that have schools listed in years two, three, four, five and six of AYP will be given priority for targeted assistance and professional development to meet the needs of schools. As determined from data analysis, meeting the needs of teachers of special education classes is a high-need, high-priority focus for professional development and technical assistance.
Consolidated State Application
The Oklahoma priority is that all students be taught by highly qualified teachers. At the beginning of the Consolidated State Application, all districts provide an assurance that the district will target Title II, Part A funds to schools that have the lowest population of highly qualified teachers or are identified for school improvement under 1116(b)(1)(A) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).
Title II, Part A

Through the Title II, Part A Consolidated State Application, districts provide a justification for class-size reduction choices of schools, grade levels and subjects, particularly in schools that do not make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). The plan must document that high quality professional development is provided to teachers as defined in NCLB. In addition, a priority for districts and sites that do not have 100% of classes taught by highly qualified teachers should be staffing needs. The Office of Grants Planning and Grants Management staff are assigned to districts to ensure the priority for use of funds is to ensure that highly qualified teachers are teaching the core content areas.
State Legislation

Senate Bill 1485 (70 O.S. § 6-194) Professional Development Requirements

Effective July 1, 2006, state legislation provides that each professional development committee, in developing program recommendations shall annually utilize a data-driven approach to analyze student data and determine district and school professional development needs. The professional development programs adopted shall be directed toward development of competencies and instructional strategies in the core curriculum areas for the following goals:

  1. Increasing the academic performance index scores for the district and each school site;

  2. Closing the achievement gaps among student groups;

  3. Increasing student achievement as demonstrated on state-mandated tests and the ACT;

  4. Increasing high school graduation rates; and

  5. Decreasing college remediation rates.


Each district shall, at the end of each school year, submit a report to the Oklahoma State Department of Education on the:

  1. District level professional development needs;

  2. Activities completed;

  3. Expenditures, and;

  4. Results achieved for each school year by each goal listed above.


School Support Teams – On-Site Visits to School Improvement Schools

Oklahoma’s School Support Teams provide significant support and technical assistance, including high quality professional development for identified school improvement schools including the 7.13% that are not highly qualified teacher in the areas of special education and middle school language arts and mathematics. In June, 2006, Dr. Joe Johnson and Dr. Melvina Phillips provided professional development for School Support Team members that will be coaching school improvement schools during the 2006-2007 school-year.

Dr. Robert Marzano Seminars for School Improvement Schools

Schools identified for school improvement will participate in three two-day seminar sessions in November, 2006 and February and March, 2007 with Dr. Marzano and his team. Each school improvement site team will complete What Works in Schools Surveys which will be analyzed by Dr. Marzano and returned to the schools to determine professional development needs of staff. The follow-up seminars will be focused on individual school needs and provide strategies for next steps for these schools not making AYP.
Nine Essential Elements Resource Guide

The Oklahoma Nine Essential Element resource guide is a research-based document to assist schools in completing a comprehensive needs assessment. This resource guide also provides suggested strategies for each performance indicator. The Nine Essential Elements include the following:

Academic Performance: Curriculum; Classroom Evaluation/Assessment;

Instruction

Learning Environment: School Culture; Student Family, Community

Support; Professional Growth and Development

Efficiency: Leadership; Organizational Structure and Resources;

Comprehensive and Effective Planning
This document has been mailed to every district superintendent and principal as well as presented at the State Superintendent’s Leadership Conference. It is also available on the OSDE Web site. The Nine Essential Elements focus on one goal: Improved Student Achievement. Continuous technical assistance and training is available to all districts and this resource guide is used as the framework for school support team coaching and assistance of low-performing schools. This fall, 2006, Dr. Robert Marzano plans to align the Oklahoma document with What Works in Schools research for use with Oklahoma’s School Improvement Schools.
3.3 Does the plan include a description of programs and services the SEA will provide to assist teachers and LEAs in successfully meeting HQT goals?
REVISED INFORMATION
Technical assistance will be provided by OSDE to districts as they write their District highly qualified teacher plans for having 100% of their teachers become highly qualified. This assistance will be provided by the Office of Grants Planning team with input from the Professional Standards and Certification Team prior to second semester of 2006-2007. The district and teacher plans are due November 17, 2006. Once the plans are written, technical assistance will be provided to districts as they implement their plans through on-site visits, videoconferences, and with the assistance of our School Support Coordinators at the 10 videoconference sites across the state. Priority for technical assistance will be for those districts with high numbers or percents of teachers who are not highly qualified.
The Oklahoma State Department of Education provides professional development and technical assistance to teachers to ensure that the 100% highly qualified requirements are met through a variety of programs and services. In order to provide special education teachers assistance in meeting highly-qualified teacher goals, the OSDE plans to continue to provide professional development so that core content teachers meet highly qualified requirements by demonstrating core content knowledge; recruiting highly-qualified teachers; retaining highly qualified teachers.
Based on Oklahoma data, the priority for OSDE is to provide special education teachers and teachers of middle school mathematics and language arts targeted professional development to ensure they meet the highly qualified requirements.

The OSDE is here to work with districts so that the remaining 7.13% of classes taught by non-highly qualified teachers have highly qualified teachers as quickly as possible.
3.4 Does the plan specifically address the needs of any subgroups of teachers identified in Requirement 1?
REVISED INFORMATION
The data indicates that special education teachers and middle school language arts and mathematics teachers are the subgroups of teachers identified in Requirement 1 and identified for professional development.


Special Education Teachers
Special education teachers are a subgroup that has been identified for technical assistance and professional development to ensure that districts and sites have 100% of classes taught by highly qualified teachers.
Videoconferences

Oklahoma Special Education Services provides professional development through the videoconference center including but not limited to: differentiated instruction; collaborative teaching; including students with significant cognitive disabilities in the general education curriculum; accommodations and modifications in the general education curriculum; and inclusion.
September 7-8, 2006 Special Education Personnel Development Opportunity

Featured speaker, Dr. Marilyn Friend, Chairperson and Professor of Education in the Department of Specialized Education Services at the University of North Carolina shared with 2,000 participants effective strategies for special education teachers to co-teach and collaboratively teach to provide instruction to students. She teaches coursework on inclusive practices and collaboration among service providers. She has consulted with school professionals nationally and internationally. Her particular areas of interest include skills for collaboration, co-teaching and inclusive school practices.

September 21-22, 2006 State Superintendent’s Conference for Special Education Teachers and Directors

This conference provided opportunities for personnel development regarding highly qualified teachers in the area of special education. Sessions included strategies for effective collaborative teaching.
State Personnel Development Grant

The SIG is in a no-cost extension that will end December 31, 2006. Recently, SIG staff submitted a proposal to the USDE, Office of Special Education Programs, for the State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG). As of Friday, September 29, 2006, Oklahoma was awarded the SPDG for implementation over a five year period. A major focus of the SPDG will be assisting secondary special education teachers in becoming highly qualified in a core content subject area. The SPDG will also attempt to recruit highly qualified candidates interested in becoming certified in special education. The pool of candidates will be drawn from existing highly qualified regular education teachers and, specifically, those that are alternatively certified. Tuition reimbursement for college classes, review sessions for certification exams, and reimbursement for passing certification exams will be provided to these successful candidates. A stipend will be provided to those candidates who teach a special education class one additional year after receiving special education or core area certification.
First Year Special Education Teacher Academy

Another focus of the SPDG is to continue to help provide support to first-year teachers. The Special Education Services section will be initiating a First-Year Teacher Academy where first-year teachers are provided training and support through their first year. The SPDG will implement activities to continue providing support during the second and third years of teaching, since attrition is greatest within the first three years of teaching. These activities will be an extension, or continuation, of the FACETS and ASSETS programs.
Special Education Video Vignettes

The Oklahoma Special Education Division in collaboration with PASSport II (an online lesson planner), has developed video vignettes available during 2006-2007 school year, illustrating accommodations and modifications being provided in classrooms and collaboration between regular education and special education teachers.
Middle Level Mathematics
Mathematics has been identified as an area for professional development of teachers, particularly in the middle level grades. The Oklahoma Mathematics Improvement Program supports teachers in increasing content knowledge and becoming more highly qualified and highly effective teachers.
Oklahoma Mathematics Improvement Program is for teachers to become highly qualified based on professional development and teacher testing.
The Oklahoma Mathematics Improvement Program focuses state funding on increasing the content knowledge of teachers of mathematics in grades 6-8. Through three tracks of professional development opportunities (mathematics academies, higher education courses, and smaller learning community lesson studies), the program offers instruction in mathematics content as well as pedagogy. Upon completion of the professional development program, teachers will be able to complete the testing requirement that will consider them highly qualified for middle school mathematics through Algebra II.
Oklahoma Mathematics Laboratory Program (Oklahoma state funding)

This is a program for teachers and students to improve middle school student mathematics achievement.
The Oklahoma Mathematics Laboratory Program provides state funding to offer a scientifically research-based mathematics laboratory program, I CAN LEARN, to ten middle schools/junior highs each year beginning 2005-2006. Qualifying requirements include:


  • Ten public schools with low student achievement in mathematics at the middle school level.




  • Each school shall have at least fifty percent of its students performing below satisfactory on the eighth grade mathematics criterion referenced test of the Oklahoma School Testing Program in at least one of the two preceding years.




  • There shall be a limit of one school per district each year.




  • There shall be representation from urban, suburban, and rural districts provided that such schools meet all other criteria.




  • There shall be representation from each quadrant of the state provided that such schools meet all other criteria.


The laboratory focuses on using technology to provide mathematics instruction to students attending schools who have not been successful in mathematics on statewide testing. Through the use of the system, teachers are provided professional development opportunities both in content and pedagogy. By completing the courses available with the program, teachers are exposed to new content or reminded of previously learned mathematics content from fundamentals through Algebra II. Studies in best practices and focus groups related to the use of the program increase pedagogical skills.
For the 2005-2006 school-year, student results for the participating schools was an average increase of 16% for the ten participating schools on the eighth grade criterion-referenced mathematics test. An important note is that part of the selection criteria for participating schools was that these schools have at least 50% of their students scoring below satisfactory on the state mathematics assessment.
3.5 Does the plan include a description of how the State will use its available funds (e.g. Title I, Part A; Title II, Part A, including the portion that goes to the State agency for higher education; other Federal and State funds, (as appropriate) to address the needs of teachers who are not highly qualified?
REVISED INFORMATION
All Oklahoma districts use at least a portion of their Title II, Part A funding to target schools that have the highest number of teachers that do not meet the highly qualified requirements in addition to those schools in need of improvement. Districts can also use Title I, Part A, Title II, Part D, Title III, Title V and IDEA funds for focused professional development.
Oklahoma has identified classes not taught by highly qualified teachers in the areas of special education and middle school mathematics and language arts. In order to provide targeted professional development for these teachers, OSDE has identified the following programs and funding sources to address the needs of teachers who are not highly qualified.
Oklahoma Reading Academies (Title I, Part B, Subpart 1 funding)

The Oklahoma Reading Academy is committed to helping teachers achieve success through effective professional development. The Academy content is independent of any specific reading program.
The Academy offers professional development program combining online learning with face-to-face study group interaction and classroom based practice activities that foster student achievement.
A teacher can receive college credit for the Oklahoma Reading Academy and the state encourages districts to use their Title II, Part A funds to support teachers in obtaining content knowledge through this high quality instruction.
Mathematics and Science Partnerships (Title II, Part B funding)

The Mathematics and Science Partnerships (MSP) competitive grant program provides high-need schools, that is, those that serve no fewer than 10,000 children from families with incomes below the poverty line or a school district in which 40% of the children live in poverty, with professional development. The professional development is a partnership with institution(s) of higher education and business. The professional development is sustained, intensive, classroom focused, and aligned with the state mathematics and science standards and curricula. For the 2006-2007 school year, priority will be given to high-poverty, high-minority, low-performing schools. The funds are used to:


  1. Establish and operate mathematics and/or science summer workshops or institutes conducted for a period of at least two weeks during the summer.

  2. Provide follow-up training during the academic year that is conducted in the classroom for a period of four days

  3. Enhance the ability of the teachers to understand and use the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS), Oklahoma’s academic content standards, for mathematics and science.

  4. Train teachers to use curricula supported by scientific research, aligned with PASS, object-centered, experiment-oriented, and based on concepts, content and process.


State Personnel Development Grant

The SIG is in a no-cost extension that will end December 31, 2006. Recently, SIG staff submitted a proposal to the USDE, Office of Special Education Programs, for the State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG). As of Friday, September 29, 2006, Oklahoma was awarded the SPDG for implementation over a five year period. A major focus of the SPDG will be assisting secondary special education teachers in becoming highly qualified in a core content subject area. The SPDG will also attempt to recruit highly qualified candidates interested in becoming certified in special education. The pool of candidates will be drawn from existing highly qualified regular education teachers and, specifically, those that are alternatively certified. Tuition reimbursement for college classes, review sessions for certification exams, and reimbursement for passing certification exams will be provided to these successful candidates. A stipend will be provided to those candidates who teach a special education class one additional year after receiving special education or core area certification.
3.6 Does the plan for the use of available funds indicate that priority will be given to the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP?
REVISED INFORMATION

School improvement schools and schools not making AYP are a high priority for professional development and monitoring.

Several initiatives currently address the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP. Oklahoma provides the following:


  • School Improvement schools receive extra funds and technical assistance through the videoconference network to demonstrate strategies that assist teachers.




  • State and federal funds provide for professional development and services to teachers to ensure that special education teachers and middle school mathematics and language arts core content teachers are highly qualified.




  • School Support Teams provide technical assistance to SI schools for years 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.




  • Oklahoma provides focused professional development. For example, Dr. Joe Johnson has provided professional development aligned to the Nine Essential Elements for Oklahoma’s School Support Teams that coach sites identified for school improvement for two consecutive years.




  • Using Title II, Part A funds, Dr. Bob Marzano will provide three sessions during the 2006-2007 school-year, using What Works Survey in the first session as a focus for a needs assessment and two follow-up sessions to provide feedback and continuous support for implementing What Works strategies.




  • Best practices videoconferences continue to be presented by Title I Distinguished Schools and Title I Academic Achievement Award schools that have closed the achievement gaps as targeted professional development for low-performing schools with high-minority and high-poverty populations.




  • Federal Title II, Part A, technical assistance funds are used for contracts for retired educators who have been successful in high-minority, high-poverty schools. to be Team Leaders of School Support Teams.




  • Title II, Part A funds the Master Teacher program research-based materials, and for stipends to Master Teachers who provide training at the site, district and regional level including study groups focused on targeted content areas. Priority is given to low-performing schools when Master Teachers are selected.




  • Title II, Part A funds Curriculum Walkthroughs professional development for instructional leaders and priority is given to school improvement sites.




  • Dr. Marilyn Friend’s presentation of practices for effective co-teaching is available on DVD and will be purchased using Title II, Part A and Special Education funds so that all districts can benefit from the research-based strategies of effective co-teaching (regular education teachers and special education teachers).




  • Title II, Part A funding provides for School Support Coordinators at each videoconference site to facilitate presentations. The OSDE uses the videoconference center to provide technical assistance and professional development for teachers and to assist districts and schools regionally with writing and implementing school improvement plans, corrective action plans and restructuring plans and securing resources.


Requirement 4: The revised plan must describe how the SEA will work with LEAs that fail to reach the 100 percent HQT goal by the end of the 2006-07 school year.


    1. Does the plan indicate how the SEA will monitor LEA compliance with the LEAs HQT plans described in Requirement 2 and hold LEAs accountability for fulfilling their plans?

Oklahoma State Department of Education will provide technical assistance and professional development opportunities for all districts and focus particularly on those districts that do not reach the 100 percent highly qualified teacher goal. The OSDE will use the data that identifies those districts that have less than 100% of their teachers highly qualified and require them to complete and submit a plan by November 17, 2006 to the OSDE. To assist districts with the writing of the plan and the implementation of the plan, the OSDE will have videoconferences, and onsite technical assistance. In addition, the Title I and Title II staff will do team monitoring (Attachment J). All schools in school improvement status will receive visits from the School Support Teams to assist in strategies for increasing teacher content knowledge.


Information will be available on the OSDE Web site including the Title I letter to districts outlining the Highly qualified plan requirements; the powerpoints from the State Superintendent’s Leadership Conference related to highly qualified requirements; the State Equity Action Plan; the data for highly qualified on state report cards; the HOUSSE requirements; Professional Development Toolkit and Curriculum conferences and resources.


    1. Does the plan show how technical assistance from the SEA to help LEAs meet the 100 percent HQT goal will be targeted toward LEAs and schools that are not making AYP?

Data collected on classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified was aligned with the data on districts and sites that did not make AYP for the 2005-2006 school year. Analysis of this data will determine the monitoring schedule and technical assistance provided by the OSDE for the fall of 2006. Priority will be given to districts and sites that did not make AYP and that have the greatest percent of classes taught by non-highly-qualified teachers. In the Office of Grants Planning, Program Specialists are assigned to districts to provide technical assistance to ensure that all core content classes are taught by highly qualified teachers. Further consequences will be discussed as districts enter year two and three of failing to meet both goals of 100% of classes being taught by highly qualified teachers and not making AYP.




    1. Does the plan describe how the SEA will monitor whether LEAs attain 100 percent HQT in each LEA and school:

  • In the percentage of highly qualified teachers at each LEA and school; and

  • In the percentage of teachers who are receiving high-quality professional development to enable such teachers to become highly qualified and successful classroom teachers?


REVISED INFORMATION
OSDE collects highly qualified data; monitors district and teacher plans; analyzes all information to ensure districts are placing high quality teachers in the classrooms.
The data collection disaggregates the data to include the percentage of highly qualified teachers at each district and site. In addition, data will be collected for the percentage of teachers who are receiving high quality professional development that will enable identified teachers to become highly qualified through the professional development programs available in the state. Monitoring will occur through review of district Consolidated State Applications; Regional Accreditation Officers on-site review of teacher credentials and class assignments; on-site and desk-monitoring by Office of Grants Planning and verification through the new Oklahoma Educator Credentialing System.
Oklahoma’s certificate renewal system requires that all teachers receive high quality professional development that supports teachers’ professional growth. The professional development is required to be aligned to Oklahoma’s state academic content standards, the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) and provide for student learning.
Oklahoma’s PASSport II provides teachers a Web resource with Oklahoma’s PASS standards as it core. It provides teachers with a Web database that has lessons and strategies directly aligned to PASS standards. There is a lesson planning template for teachers to create standards-based interactive, Web-based lessons.
PASSport II allows teachers to create high quality lessons and units directly aligned to Oklahoma’s state standards; to store and share lessons and/or units with students, teachers and parents; to provide a professional development resource that assists other teachers in identifying and creating a high quality standards-based lesson.



    1. Consistent with ESEA 2141, does the plan include technical assistance or corrective actions that the SEA will apply if LEAs fail to meet HQT and AYP goals

The Office of Grants Management and Office of Grants Planning will continue to provide technical assistance to districts and schools that do not meet HQ goals and AYP goals. Programs and support are described in Requirement 3 responses. Oklahoma’s school support teams provide coaching and technical assistance to school improvement sites in years 2, 3, 4, and 5. These teams include superintendents, principals, and other district personnel; higher education representatives and SDE staff and are led by retired educators. The Oklahoma Nine Essential Elements Resource Guide is a research-based tool that identifies the essential elements; the performance indicators; strategies for success and resources to implement a continuous school improvement plan. (Attachment K ) Each site receives three visits from the team from October through March of the school year.


Oklahoma is adding a new data system to interface with our Educator Credentialing system that will be operational January 5, 2007. The 2006-2007 data collection will be available at the beginning of second semester and be compared to the 2005-2006 data collection to identify districts and sites that have not made sufficient progress toward meeting the highly qualified goal. These districts will be a priority for monitoring to determine the implementation status of plans submitted to the OSDE November 17, 2006. In addition, districts will attach a copy of the letter of notification sent to parents in cases where a non-highly-qualified teacher is teaching a core academic content area.

Initiative #3: Recruit and hire highly qualified teachers,

including those licensed or certified through alternative

routes and retain highly qualified teachers.
Oklahoma State Department of Education

Title II, Part A Plan

Highly Qualified Teachers
Performance Goal 3: By 2005-2006, all students will be taught by highly qualified teachers.
Performance Indicator 3.1: Performance Indicator: The percentage of classes being taught by “highly qualified” teachers (as the term is defined in section 9101 (23) of the ESEA), in the aggregate and in “high-poverty” schools (as the term is defined in section 1111 (h)(1)(C)(viii) of the ESEA).
Baseline Data: The percentage of classes being taught by “highly qualified” (64%) teachers (as the term is defined in section 9101(23) of the ESEA), in the aggregate and in “high poverty” (57%) schools (as the term is defined in section 1111(h)(1)(C)(viii) of the ESEA).
Performance Target: The target percentages of classes being taught by “highly qualified” teachers will be 72% in 2003-2004, 86% in 2004-2005, and 100% in 2005-2006. The target percentages of classes being taught by “highly qualified” teachers in “high-poverty” schools will be 65% in 2003-2004, 75% in 2004-2005, and 100% in 2005-2006. Revised performance target for the classes being taught by “highly qualified” teachers in “high poverty” schools, including special education teachers, is 88% in 2005-2006 and 100% in 2006-2007.
Requirement 5: The revised plan must explain how and when the SEA will complete the HOUSSE process for teachers not new to the profession who were hired prior to the end of the 2005-2006 school year, and how the SEA will discontinue the use of HOUSSE procedures for teachers hired after the end of the 2005-2006 school year.
5.1 Does the plan describe how and when the SEA will complete the HOUSSE process for all teachers not new to the profession who were hired before the end of the 2005-2006 school year?
92.85 percent of Oklahoma teachers are highly qualified. Many of Oklahoma teachers have tested in core subject areas since Oklahoma has had teacher testing since 1982. As the data reflects, 7.13% of classes are taught by non-highly-qualified teachers and the majority of those are classes of special education students. OSDE recognizes that the area of focus is providing assistance to our special education teachers.
With that in mind, a general education teacher wanting to use HOUSSE after June, 2007 to achieve highly qualified status will be required to send past employment documentation to OSDE along with the HOUSSE rubric to verify they are a veteran teacher in the specific assignment area of the request. The exception to this will be for teachers who can document they had an approved plan of study from their building or district administrator and have been working toward the highly qualified designation and submitted documentation to OSDE.
Oklahoma Department of Education sent a letter and plan template to all District Superintendents in August, 2006 requiring districts to provide the funding support as appropriate for professional development; college coursework; test preparation; and/or test fees to act in good faith to ensure teachers become highly qualified as soon as possible. Teachers also are required to develop a plan of study to meet the highly qualified requirements.
The HOUSSE rubric for special education content teachers was not approved by the United States Department of Education in March, 2006. Therefore, OSDE will need to do a new data collection during the 2006-2007 school year to determine highly qualified status of special education teachers providing direct instruction. The OSDE will give special education teachers providing direct instruction an opportunity where appropriate to achieve highly qualified status in any additional content areas for which they are not currently teaching.
5.2 Does the plan describe how the State will discontinue the use of HOUSSES after the end of the 2005-2006 school year, except in the following situations:

  • Multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools who, if HQ in one subject at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within three years of the date of hire; or

  • Multi-subject special education teachers who are new to the profession, if HQ in language arts, mathematics, or science at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within two years of the date of hire.

Most Oklahoma teachers have met the highly qualified requirements. Oklahoma has had teacher testing in place since 1982 and therefore HOUSSE has limited use.
Currently, only 7.13% of Oklahoma teachers do not meet the highly qualified requirements and the use of HOUSSE will be the exception rather than the rule after 2006-2007 school year. Approximately fifty percent of the 7.13% classes not taught by highly qualified teachers are classes taught by special education teachers. Special provisions have been made by the state to ensure that special education teachers are a high priority in meeting highly qualified requirements.
The Title I letter to districts (Attachment H) describes the requirements for highly qualified status. A plan template was sent as an attachment to the Title I letter. The plan template requires the district to describe the actions to be taken to ensure all teachers meet the requirements by June 30, 2007.
Multi-subject special education teachers

Multi-subject special education teachers who are new to the profession, if highly qualified in language arts, mathematics, or science at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within two years of the date of hire.
Multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools

Multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools who, if highly qualified in one subject at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within three years of the date of hire. The HOUSSE for multi-subject secondary teachers in rural areas is not used extensively in Oklahoma. The HOUSSE will be available, however, on a case by case basis for veteran teachers in this situation.
Information related to certification and highly qualified requirements were presented July 6th and 7th, 2006 at the State Superintendent’s Leadership Conference (Attachments B and C). In addition, several videoconferences are scheduled to assist school districts with plans to be submitted by November 1, 2006, to describe how all teachers will meet the highly qualified requirements by June 30, 2007.
Oklahoma State Department of Education personnel will monitor districts that have greater than 20% of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers.
Requirement 6: The revised plan must include a copy of the State’s written ‘equity plan’ for ensuring that poor or minority children are not taught by inexperienced, unqualified, or out-of-field teachers at higher rates than are other children.
GOAL: Ensure that poor and minority children are not taught by inexperienced, unqualified, or out-of-field teachers at higher rates than are other children.

The chart on the next page shows the data that has been analyzed to determine the focus of technical assistance and professional development for non-highly-qualified teachers in high-poverty and high-minority schools. We continue to review this data to ensure appropriate assistance to our districts and sites.



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6.1 Does the revised plan include a written equity plan?
Oklahoma will focus on recruiting, retaining and training teachers, particularly in high-poverty, high-minority schools, to ensure that poor and minority children are not taught by inexperienced, unqualified, or out-of-field teachers at higher rates than are other children. Oklahoma will provide all districts information about recommended strategies to increase the number of highly qualified teachers, redistributing existing teachers, improving teachers content knowledge and skills and improving working conditions.
Recommended strategies to increase the number of highly qualified teachers include:

Strategies to increase the number of highly qualified teachers:



  • Consider teachers that have alternative certification including Troops to Teachers

  • Teacher preparation programs to prepare teachers specifically to work in high minority, high poverty schools

  • Provide information to teacher candidates about scholarships, loans, loan forgiveness programs to recruit and prepare teachers specifically for high-poverty, high-minority, low-performing and hard-to-staff schools.

Strategies to redistribute existing teachers:



  • Financial incentives including the use of Title II, Part A funds

  • Non-monetary incentives

  • Increase the number of National Board Certified teachers in high-poverty, high-minority and/or low-performing schools

  • Hire retired teachers to provide experienced teachers in hard-to-staff schools

Strategies to improve teacher content knowledge and skills



  • Provide instructional facilitators targeted to low-performing sites within a district

  • Provide district induction program in addition the Oklahoma resident teacher program

  • Use master teachers available in all regions of the state to provide content support and study groups

  • Provide professional development targeted toward content classes not taught by highly qualified teachers

Strategies to improve working conditions



  • Reallocate resources to high-needs schools

  • Improve safety and discipline in high-needs schools

  • Develop policies and programs to attract highly qualified teachers and principals

  • Provide professional development resources

The Oklahoma equity plan provides for monitoring progress and ensuring that 100% of Oklahoma teachers providing direct instruction in core content areas meet the highly qualified requirements.

1. Through data collection and analysis, Oklahoma will continuously monitor that Oklahoma’s poor and minority students are not being taught at higher rates than other students by inexperienced, unqualified, and out-of-field teachers.


  • Collect data for the percentage of core academic subjects taught by teachers who meet the highly-qualified teacher requirements in Oklahoma’s districts and schools with the highest concentration of poverty and minority children.

  • Collect data for the percentage of core academic subjects taught by teachers who meet the highly-qualified teacher requirements in Oklahoma’s schools that have not met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

  • Collect data for the percentage of teachers with three or more years of teaching experience in high-need schools (30% or more of the population qualify for free/reduced lunch)

  • Publicly Report Progress: State Report Card, District Report Card, School Report Card (See Attachment P and Q)

2. Provide resources and technical assistance to districts and sites to increase the percentage of core academic subjects in Oklahoma taught by teachers who meet the highly qualified requirements to 100%.




  • Measure and report the percentage of core academic subjects taught by teachers who meet the highly qualified requirements in Oklahoma’s districts and sites.

  • Publicly Report Progress: State Report Card, District Report Card, School Report Card (See Attachment P and Q)

Equity Plan Components include:




  1. Data and Reporting Systems

  2. Teacher Preparation

  3. Out-of-Field Teaching

  4. Recruitment and Retention of Experienced Teachers

  5. Professional Development

  6. Specialized Knowledge and Skills

  7. Working Conditions

  8. Policy Coherence


A. Data and Reporting Systems
How is the state planning to develop the teacher data and reporting systems needed to identify and correct inequities in the distribution of quality teachers in high-poverty/high-minority schools vs. low-poverty/low-minority schools?
The first step in providing assistance to high-poverty/high-minority schools vs. low-poverty/low minority schools is to identify those areas of need. Oklahoma continues to update its data systems and is in the process of creating a new Oklahoma Web-based Educator Credentialing System which will link to a Highly Qualified Teacher reporting system for 2006-2007 available January, 2007.
A.1 Oklahoma Web-based Educator Credentialing System (OECS)

A contract issued in June 2006, for the 2006-07 development of an Oklahoma Web-based Educator Credentialing System (OECS), will provide essential data on teachers (areas of certification, subject test results, degree, major, and National Board Certification), in a relational database than can be easily linked with other teachers systems that provide key information affecting equality: systems such as School Personnel Records, (location and type of school), Teacher Class Schedules (subject and number of students taught) and Accreditation (demographics of student population). Oklahoma’s improved capacity to accurately assess the highly qualified status of teachers in each school will provide a solid foundation for the future identification, analyses and plan for correction, of the distribution inequity of quality teachers between high-poverty/high-minority schools vs. low-poverty/low-minority schools


A.2 Teacher Shortage Report

Oklahoma State Department of Education (OSDE) provides information about teacher shortage areas in annual reports for the State Board of Education


A.3 School Report Cards

School report cards include professional qualifications of teachers and percent of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers.


School Report Cards for the State and Districts are provided on the Oklahoma State Department of Education Web site that includes Professional Qualifications of Teachers (Bachelors; Masters; Post-Masters or Doctorate) and Percent of Classes Taught by Teachers Considered Highly Qualified According to Federal Law in high poverty schools and low poverty schools. (Attachment H and I for 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 State Report Card of Professional Qualifications of Teachers).
Data to districts for sites that include the Professional Qualifications of Teachers and Percent of Classes Taught by Teachers Considered Highly Qualified in high poverty schools and low poverty schools is available through the Oklahoma State Department of Education Office of Accountability and Assessment upon request.
A.4 District Professional Development Report

Each district shall annually submit a report to the State Department of Education on the district level professional development needs, activities completed, expenditures, and results achieved for each school year by each goal.


A.5 Oklahoma Accreditation Reporting Site

Oklahoma Accreditation Reporting Site requires data submission of highly qualified teacher status disaggregated by high poverty and low poverty schools.

District Data and Site Data reports are available and will be verified by District and Site Administrators. In addition, Title I and Title II desk and on-site monitoring checks highly qualified data entry. Title I communicates by letter to each district superintendent and principal the requirements for all core academic content classes to be taught by a highly qualified teacher and provides a template for preparing a plan to ensure all teachers meet the highly qualified requirements (Attachment C). Title I also provides a sample letter for principals to send to parents if a class is not taught by a highly qualified teacher (Attachment D). Regional Accreditation Officers (RAOs) visit schools annually and monitor teacher class assignments for all teachers. RAOs particularly check for new personnel and reassigned personnel to determine if they meet the highly qualified teacher requirements. During the summer of 2006, letters to district superintendents, special education directors and principals were sent describing collaborative teaching, co-teaching and requirements for direct instruction in core academic subject areas by special education teachers. In addition, two sessions related to instruction by special education teachers and requirements for highly qualified status for all teachers were presented at the State Superintendent’s Leadership Conference for approximately 3,000 superintendents, principals, special education directors, counselors July 6th and 7th (Attachment E and F).
A.6 OSDE Web site Reporting

The Oklahoma State Department of Education (OSDE) Web site links to state and federal initiatives; federal program guidance; curriculum opportunities and conferences; professional development toolkit; and state report cards.

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