Oklahoma State Department of Education




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OECS To Add Highly Qualified Teacher System Component – January 5, 2007

Based on the analysis of the self-reported data by school districts, Oklahoma recognizes that we need a more reliable data reporting solution. By January 5, 2007, the contractor for the OECS is scheduled to develop a new Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) System Component that will initially be a stand alone system, but will be fully integrated with the OECS once it is in production. The new highly qualified teacher system will be able to display an educator’s highly qualified credentials for core subject areas, Oklahoma certificate areas and classes an educator can teach. This system will be able to automatically highly qualify teachers where existing electronic data allows. There are currently two areas where it will be possible to electronically highly qualify teachers, that is, subject area tests that have been passed and National Board Certification in a content area. A third area, degree majors, will be added as part of the new HQT system. In addition, the system will provide the capability to map the highly qualified credential to multiple classes. For example, if the teacher has a certificate, including testing in Advanced Mathematics, the teacher would automatically be highly qualified to teach Calculus, Trigonometry, Statistics, etc. Appropriate mappings will be determined by the Professional Standards and Certification Division.


OECS/Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) - Improved Principal Review Process

The new HQT system will support Oklahoma’s position that once a teacher is highly qualified in an area, he/she remains highly qualified, thereby eliminating the need to review and accept all HQT data from the prior year. Returning principals will be required to process the subset of teachers that are new or reassigned and those that the system has not yet recognized as highly qualified in an assigned subject area. Principals new to a school site will also have reduced review responsibilities, because of the large numbers of teachers automatically highly qualified without the use of HOUSSE. In addition, individual teachers will have the opportunity to enter the data. The teacher’s principal will still approve or deny the entry.


OECS/HQT – Increased Reliability of the Data

The combination of features mentioned will collectively increase the reliability of the data because the less data entry that is required the fewer errors will be introduced. Additionally, the contract indicates that the vendor will ensure that any entry that is required will not be free form entered. All data will be validated for accuracy before being saved to the database. Certain data will be pre-populated into the system and therefore, questions will not be necessary. For example, it will not be necessary to ask what area the teacher has certification because the certification system database will be part of the OECS.


Once the system is in production, it will be clear how educators have documented that they are highly qualified. If they use HOUSSE, there will be a step-by-step entry of all the HOUSSE data. For example, if they choose to include college courses completed, the system will request the college and course description. The college will be chosen from a list.
OECS – Empowering Principals With Planning Tools

By building a HQT database by teacher and HQ credential areas, the system will provide new tools to the site principals. There will be a site search utility that allows principals to locate educators and determine what classes they are considered highly qualified to teach. The screen will show the core subject area, the HQ credential area and the list of classes that apply to that HQ credential area. This tool will assist principals as they are considering new hires for employment. Included on the screen will be the criteria used to determine highly qualified status; that is, the screen will display the content test(s), HOUSSE, major, etc., depending on how the highly qualified status was achieved.


Oklahoma Credential

Oklahoma is considering a way to provide an official document that can be printed and distributed to Oklahoma teachers stating how the teacher met the highly qualified requirement core subject areas, certificate areas and classes. The majority of Oklahoma teachers have tested in core subject areas due to teacher testing since 1982 and therefore, meet the highly qualified requirement of demonstrating content knowledge in the core content areas, in addition to having a bachelor’s degree and Oklahoma teaching certificate.


Information to districts for special education teachers


  • July, 2006 letter from Assistant State Superintendent for Special Education and Assistant State Superintendent for Professional Standards and Certification explaining the single subject HOUSSE for special education teachers and information about co-teaching strategies and professional development (Attachment A).


Information to districts about appropriate co-teaching strategies


  • July, 2006 letter sent to superintendents and special education directors

  • July, 2006 State Superintendent’s Leadership Conference presentations (Attachments B and C

  • Assistant State Superintendent for Special Education met with all Special Education directors August 4, 2006

  • Special Education Frequently Asked Questions letter sent 9-14-06 and provided to Superintendent’s Advisory on 9-14-06 (Attachments D and E)

  • Dr. Marilyn Friend presentation, Co-Teaching: Principles, Practices, and Pragmatics, for two days for 2,000 regular education and special education teachers and administrators on September 6th and 7th, 2006

  • State Superintendent’s Special Education Conference with sessions specific to co-teaching strategies 9-21-06 and 9-22-06


1.2 Does the analysis focus on the staffing needs of schools that are not making AYP? Do these schools have high percentages of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified?
REVISED INFORMATION
The state percentage of classes not taught by HQ teachers is 7.13%. The percentage of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers in schools that did not make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is 12.67%, a difference of 5.54%. Further disaggregation of data indicates that schools that are high poverty and not making AYP have 10.18% of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers which compares to 6.52% of all classes in high poverty schools not taught by highly qualified teachers. This will be an area to address.

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For schools not making AYP 12.67% of the classes are not taught by highly qualified teachers. Further disaggregation indicates that most of the 12.67% are special education classes taught by teachers (12%) that do not meet the highly qualified requirements. This 12% includes veteran teachers who have not had the opportunity to use the revised special education HOUSSE as required by USDE and also includes special education teachers who do not provide direct instruction in core academic classes. Assisting the special education teachers with meeting the highly qualified requirements is a high priority for Oklahoma.
1.3 Does the analysis identify particular groups of teachers to which the State’s plan must pay particular attention, such as special education teachers, mathematics or science teachers, or multi-subject teachers in rural schools?
The analysis of particular groups of teachers indicates that OSDE should provide technical assistance and professional development targeted to special education teachers who did not pass a subject-knowledge test or have not demonstrated subject-matter competency through HOUSSE. The number of classes taught by special education teachers currently reported as not highly qualified is almost half of the total 7.13% of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers. However, with our new data collection system, we predict that there are some special education teachers who are not providing direct instruction but are co-teaching or collaboratively teaching and should not be in the count of non-highly qualified teachers.
In addition, middle school mathematics and language arts teachers are a priority. However, the number of classes for middle school mathematics and language arts not taught by highly qualified teachers is less than 1%.
The table on page 9 verifies that special education teachers and middle school language arts and mathematics teachers are the non-highly qualified teachers that are priority for technical assistance and professional development.
Each of the teachers not highly qualified must submit a plan of how to become highly qualified by November 1, 2006. Middle school language arts teachers not highly qualified will also be targeted for professional development. Teachers from school improvement schools, schools not making AYP, and schools with greater than 10% of classes taught by non-highly-qualified teachers will be given registration priority. Many of these teachers have elementary certification and not secondary certification. Based on past data, we know that adolescent literacy is an area of need. Ongoing systematic professional development includes having Dr. Melvina Phillips, author of Developing a Culture of Literacy, provided professional development for school support teams last June, 2006 and will present October 4th to secondary teams. Through threaded discussion with study groups established with school improvement sites follow-up will occur with SDE Curriculum Directors facilitating the process.
Due to requirements of Oklahoma law that teachers must be certified in each content area whether rural, suburban or urban, Oklahoma does not have a large percentage of rural schools with multi-subject teachers that are not highly qualified. In addition, Oklahoma’s recruitment for shortage areas includes the Alternative Certification Program that provides highly qualified teachers in the core content areas including mathematics and science.
1.4 Does the analysis identify districts and schools around the State where significant numbers of teachers do not meet HQ standards?

REVISED INFORMATION

Districts
The analysis identifies that out of Oklahoma’s 540 districts, 107 districts had non-highly qualified (HQ) class occurrence higher than 10 percent. Districts with significant numbers of non-highly qualified classes include those that have an occurrence higher than 20%. Priorities for schools are identified by the following:
Priority 1 includes 5 districts where percent of teachers who are not HQ is

21% or higher.

Priority 2 includes 22 districts where percent of teachers who are not HQ is

greater than or equal to 16% and less than 21%

Priority 3 includes 80 districts where percent of teachers who are not HQ is

greater than or equal to 10% and less than 16%


Revised Table: September 29, 2006

Districts where percentage of classes taught by teachers that ARE NOT Highly Qualified is < 90%

Totals by Priority




Priority 1

Priority 2

Priority 3

Total




>= 21%

>= 16% and < 21%

> 10% and < 16%




Number of Districts

5

22

80

107


The table below provides number of districts, by percent of classes taught by highly qualified teachers for 2005-2006 and 2004-2005.

There are 183 Districts that have met the Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) of 100% by 2005-06 school year. There are 357 Districts that have not met 100% AMO of 2005-06 school year and 107 of those districts have less than 90% of their teachers meeting the highly qualified requirement.


Revised Table: September 29, 2006

OKLAHOMA NUMBER OF DISTRICTS, by percent of CLASSES TAUGHT by Highly Qualified Teachers

Percentages

Number of Districts 2005-2006

Number of Districts 2004-2005

(Revised 7/5/2006 to Include Special Education)

100%

183

154

>= 90% and < 100%

250

247

less than 90%

107

139

TOTAL DISTRICTS

540

540


Attachment F identifies the 2005-2006 districts with less than 90% of classes taught by highly qualified teachers. Oklahoma data shows that a very high percentage of classes are taught by highly qualified teachers. We have 183 districts that have 100%; 250 that have 99-90% of classes taught by highly qualified teachers and 107 districts that have less than 90% classes taught by highly qualified.
Schools
The analysis identifies that the schools with the most significant number of classes taught by teachers who do not meet the highly qualified requirements are located within the above listed districts and/or are schools identified for school improvement under Title I.
Approximately 5% (82 out of 1783 schools) of Oklahoma’s schools meet these criteria for the most significant number of non-highly-qualified classes. The identified schools with a designation for priority for technical assistance and monitoring are provided in the following table.
Schools with Significant Numbers of Non-Highly-Qualified Classes
Schools within districts identified with significant number of classes taught by non-highly-qualified teachers are identified. Oklahoma’s two largest urban school districts with approximately 40,000+ students each have multiple school sites that are a priority. These districts are high-poverty and high-minority.
Priorities for schools are set using the following scale and will be used

to determine Title II onsite or desk monitoring.
Priority 1 includes sites where the percent of teachers who are not highly qualified is 21% or higher.

Priority 2 includes sites where the percent of teachers who are not highly qualified is greater than or equal to 16% and less than 21%

Priority 3 includes sites where the percent of teachers who are not highly qualified is greater than or equal to 10% and less than 16%
Priority 1 = 82 sites out of 1,783 sites

Of these 82 sites, 5 failed to make AYP for 2005-2006; of these sites, 5 are identified in school improvement status

Priority 2 = 110 sites out of 1,783 sites

Of these 110 sites, 7 failed to make AYP for 2005-2006; of these sites, 8 are identified in school improvement status

Priority 3 = 251 sites out of 1,783 sites

Of these 251 sites, 8 failed to make AYP for 2005-2006; of these sites, 6 are identified in school improvement status


New Table: September 29, 2006

Schools with Significant Numbers of Non-HQ Classes

 

 

(Priority based on the percent of classes taught by teachers that ARE NOT Highly Qualified)

 

 

Priority 1

Priority 2

Priority 3

Schools

Total

>= 21%

>= 16% and < 21%

> 10% and <16%

Total Number of Schools

1,783

 

 

 

Number of schools where percent of classes taught by teachers that ARE NOT HQ

443*

82

110

251

Of the 443 Priority schools, number that failed to make AYP (preliminary data 2005-2006)

20

5

7

8

Of the 443 Priority schools, number that are identified in school improvement status (preliminary data 2005-2006)

19

5

8

6

*NOTE: The 443 total sites are found in 219 different districts.


1.5 Does the analysis identify particular courses that are often taught by non-highly qualified teachers?
The Table on page 9 identifies that most significant percentages of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified are in secondary special education teachers (almost half of the 7.13% are classes taught by special education teachers). The percentage for all other classes taught by non-highly–qualified teachers IS LESS THAN 1%. The next greatest number of classes not taught by non-highly-qualified teachers is 83 classes out of 8,381 middle school language arts classes and 42 classes out of 5,660 middle school mathematics classes.
Requirement 2: The revised plan must provide information on HQT status in each LEA and the steps the SEA will take to ensure that each LEA has plans in place to assist teachers who are not highly qualified to attain HQT status as quickly as possible.
2.1 Does the plan identify LEAs that have not met annual measurable objectives (AMO) for HQT?
REVISED INFORMATION
OSDE identifies districts that have not met annual measurable objectives (AMO) for highly qualified teachers through the Oklahoma Consolidated Federal Reporting. Oklahoma’s Consolidated State Plan submitted in September 2003 to USDE identified target goals for percentage of highly qualified teachers (See table below). All districts in the Oklahoma met the annual measurable objectives for the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 school years. For the 2005-2006 school year, the annual measurable objective for all districts was consistent with the State’s goal to have 100 percent of core academic classes taught by highly qualified teachers. Out of the 540 school districts in Oklahoma, 183 met the 100% annual measurable objective. Of the districts that did not meet the 100% AMO, 107 were less than a 90% AMO, 250 districts were at 90% - 99% of classes taught by highly qualified teachers.
Baseline Data and Performance Targets for Goal 3, Performance Indicator 3.1: The percentage of classes being taught by “highly qualified” teachers (as the term is defined in section 9101(23) of the ESEA), in the aggregate and in “high-poverty” schools (as the term is defined in section 1111(h)(1)(C)(viii) of the ESEA).





Percentage of Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

State Aggregate

Target

Percentage of Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

High-Poverty Schools

2002-2003 Baseline*

*64

*57

2003-2004 Target

72

65

2004-2005 Target

86

75

2005-2006 Target

**90

**90

2006-2007 Target

**100

**100


* This number includes only teachers who have completed subject testing (which began in 1982) and does not include the number of teachers that will qualify under the Oklahoma High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE) provision currently in draft status.

** These are revised targets to include all teachers including special education teachers
2.2 Does the plan include specific steps that will be taken by LEAS that have not met annual measurable objectives?
REVISED INFORMATION
Each district is required to present a plan and timeframe to accomplish the goal of having 100 percent of core academic classes taught by highly qualified teachers in its Consolidated State Application. The plan requires districts to identify the percent of core classes taught, percent of teachers receiving high quality professional development; the programs, strategies, activities to achieve objectives and to indicate the Title Program Funding Source(s) for each program or activity (Attachment G). This data is required annually. Districts must identify methods available to teachers to become highly qualified and must provide opportunities that will provide for teachers who have not met highly qualified requirements. District Title II, Part A applications are reviewed by OSDE personnel in Office of Grants Management and Office of Planning and Monitoring to ensure that those districts that are not at 100% highly qualified for core content academic classes use available resources, including Title II Part A allocations to ensure that teachers for core content academic classes who have not met requirements become highly qualified as quickly as possible.
Districts have identified the following as strategies that support teachers becoming highly qualified with an emphasis on special education teachers providing direct instruction in core content areas.

Strategy 1: Reimbursing special education teachers and middle school teachers in language arts and mathematics for courses needed for certification or demonstration of content knowledge mastery.

Strategy 2: Reimbursing teachers for tests in content areas

Strategy 3: Providing study sessions for teacher content exam preparation.

Strategy 4: Providing support and stipends for teachers pursuing National Board Certification. (Currently Oklahoma has 1289 NBCT)

Strategy 5: Districts reevaluate how teacher assignments are made in order to ensure that teachers are assigned to classes for which they are highly qualified.
Because Oklahoma only has 7.13% of classes taught by non-highly-qualified teachers and the majority of that percentage of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers are core content classes for special education students, special education division is funding technical assistance and professional development in addition to targeted Title II, Part A funds.


    1. Does the plan delineate specific steps the SEA will take to ensure that all LEAs have plans in place to assist all non-HQ teachers to become HQ as quickly as possible?


REVISED INFORMATION
The OSDE will ensure that all districts have a plan in place to assist all non-highly-qualified teachers become highly qualified. Oklahoma State Department of Education will monitor districts for the individual plans for non-highly qualified teachers to become highly qualified as quickly as possible.
District Plans
In August, 2006 all districts were notified that they would be required to submit a plan to the OSDE by November 1, 2006. The OSDE requires and will monitor the district plan for providing funding support, technical assistance and professional development for targeted groups of teachers that need assistance in meeting highly qualified requirements.
Districts that do not have all teachers highly qualified or “on track” to be highly qualified before the beginning of the 2006-2007 school year are required to do the following:


  1. Develop a plan by November 17, 2006 for the district that describes actions that will be taken and uses of federal and/or state funds and resources to assist teachers in meeting the highly qualified teacher requirement.




  1. Develop a plan by November 17, 2006, for each teacher who has not yet met the NCLB highly qualified requirements. This plan must include:

a. specific activities that will be completed by the teacher to reach highly qualified status by the most efficient means;

b. specific actions to be taken by the district to facilitate the process; and

c. specific financial assistance and or other support that will be provided by the district.
Attachment H is a letter to districts outlines the specific requirements for a plan to assist all non-highly-qualified teachers to become highly qualified and templates for District Plan and Individual Teacher Plan(s). A template for the district and individual teacher plans (Attachment I) was sent to districts as well as a sample letter to notify parents if a class was taught by a non-highly-qualified teacher.
All plans will be reviewed in a timely manner by OSDE staff and feedback to districts will occur prior to second semester, so that the districts can implement strategies outlined in their plan at the beginning of second semester.
Consolidated Application for Federal Programs
Through the Consolidated Application approval process of the OSDE, highly qualified teacher data is examined. For districts that have not yet met the 100% highly qualified goal, Office of Grants Management and Office of Grants Planning which includes Title I, II, V and VI consultants, verify evidence that plans provide strategies to assist teachers in becoming highly qualified using Title II, Part A funds.
Consolidated Application Approval Process


  1. Title II, Part A applications, budgets and budget justifications are submitted online by September 29, 2006.

  2. Office of Grants Management and Office of Grants Planning Consultants determine whether districts have met the 100% AMO goal or that the budget submitted provides for support of non-highly-qualified teachers becoming highly qualified.

  3. The consultants determine if the Title II, Part A applications and budgets support the highly-qualified teacher district and individual plans, particularly special education teachers and middle school language arts and mathematics teachers.


District Monitoring of Highly Qualified Plans
In monitoring districts, priority is given to districts that have a significant number of schools that have not met their 100% AMO. While on-site, individual teacher plans to become highly qualified are monitored to determine implementation progress, particularly special education teachers and middle school language arts and mathematics teachers. Monitoring will focus on the 7.13% of classes taught by non-highly qualified teachers which includes classes taught by special education teachers and middle school language arts and mathematics teachers.

Monitoring occurs through the Office of Grants Planning and through the Accreditation Office which employs 13 Regional Accreditation Officers who review teacher credentials and teacher assignments at every Oklahoma school site.
The Oklahoma monitoring instrument for Title II, Part A requires documentation to ensure that federal funds are used to ensure that all districts have plans in place to assist all non-highly-qualified teachers to become highly qualified by as quickly as possible. Some examples from the Consolidated Federal Program monitoring instrument (Attachment J) include:


  • Has the LEA targeted funds to schools that have the lowest proportion of highly qualified teachers; are identified for school improvement? Section 2122(b)(3)




  • Are program funds used to develop and implement initiatives to assist in recruiting highly qualified teachers, and hiring highly qualified teachers, who will be assigned teaching positions within their fields? Section 2123(a)(2)(C)




  • Has the LEA developed and implemented initiatives to promote retention of highly qualified teachers and principals, particularly within schools with a high percentage of low-achieving students? Section 2123 (a)(2)(A)(i)


Monitoring will determine the progress district has made related to plans submitted for districts and teachers to meet highly qualified requirements.
Timeline for Technical Assistance to Districts and Teachers to

Meet HQ Requirements
July, 2006 – Initiated focus on 2006-2007


  • Letters to district superintendents, special education directors and principals were sent describing collaborative teaching, co-teaching and requirements for direct instruction in core academic subject areas by special education teachers.




  • In addition, two sessions related to instruction by special education teachers and requirements for highly qualified status for all teachers were presented at the State Superintendent’s Leadership Conference for approximately 3,000 superintendents, principals, special education directors, counselors July 6th and 7th (Attachments B and C).


August, 2006


  • Letter was sent to each district superintendent and principal identifying the requirements for all core academic content classes to be taught by a highly qualified teacher.

An attachment to the letter includes the plan that is required for all that do not have 100% of their teachers identified as highly qualified. A plan for the district and a plan for each individual teacher is to be completed and submitted to the OSDE for review by November 17, 2006.
September, 2006 – March, 2007



  • Review of Title II, Part A plans occurs to determine use of funds to be focused on strategies and activities to ensure all teachers are highly qualified




  • Frequently asked questions for special education teachers sent to Superintendents and Special Education directors September 14, 2006 and is available on the OSDE Web site.



  • On-site monitoring of Oklahoma’s two urban districts (high poverty, high minority) to review district Title II plans and to ensure that all teachers meet the highly qualified requirement by the end of 2006-2007 school year will occur in October, 2006. Attached is a table that provides Adequate Yearly Progress status, school improvement status and percent of highly qualified teachers for these two urban districts which serve approximately 44,400 students each.

  • Priority monitoring of additional districts will occur.

  • Videoconferences are planned for October, 2006 for all districts to provide technical assistance in preparing plans that include research-based strategies and initiatives in order to support teachers in becoming highly qualified

  • Regional Accreditation Officers visit schools and monitor teacher class assignments for all teachers. RAOs particularly check for new personnel and reassigned personnel to determine if they meet the highly qualified teacher requirements.

  • Professional development for special education teachers, teachers in middle school language arts and mathematics teachers are a focus.

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