Oklahoma State Department of Education




старонка2/7
Дата канвертавання24.04.2016
Памер474.84 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Initiative #1: Oklahoma Activities to Publicly Report Information

Related to Highly Qualified Teachers
Oklahoma publicly reports progress of meeting annual measurable objectives (AMO) by reporting the percentage of classes taught by highly qualified teachers in each district and by reporting the professional qualifications of core content teachers for each district on the State Report Card site.
Baseline Data and Performance Targets for Goal 3, Performance Indicator 3.1: The percentage of classes being taught by “highly qualified” teachers (as the term is defined in section 9101(23) of the ESEA), in the aggregate and in “high-poverty” schools (as the term is defined in section 1111(h)(1)(C)(viii) of the ESEA).
The table below provides the 2002-2003 baseline data for the percentage of classes taught by highly qualified teachers and the targets from 2003-2004 through 2006-2007 and disaggregated for high poverty schools. The 100% target was extended to 2006-2007 school year.





Percentage of Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

State Aggregate Target

Percentage of Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

High-Poverty Schools

2002-2003 Baseline*

*64

*57

2003-2004 Target

72

65

2004-2005 Target

86

75

2005-2006 Target

**90

**90

2006-2007 Target

**100

**100

* This number includes only teachers who have completed subject testing (which began in 1982) and does not include the number of teachers that will qualify under the Oklahoma High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE) provision currently in draft status.

** These are revised targets to include all teachers including special education teachers.
The table below reports the baseline data and actual percentage of classes taught by highly qualified teachers in the aggregate and in high poverty schools from 2002-2003 through 2005-2006.


Baseline Data and Progress

Percentage of Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

State Aggregate

Percentage of Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

High-Poverty Schools

2002-2003 Baseline*

64

57

2003-2004 Actual Performance

 *98

*97.4

2004-2005 Actual Performance

**91.64%

**89.30%

2005-2006 Actual Performance

**92.81%

**91.28%


* All teachers except special education teachers

** All teachers including special education teachers


Requirement 1: The revised plan must provide a detailed analysis of the core academic subject classes in the State that are currently not being taught by highly qualified teachers. The analysis must, in particular, address schools that are not making adequate yearly progress and whether or not these schools have more acute needs than do other schools in attracting highly qualified teachers. The analysis must also identify the districts and schools around the State where significant numbers of teachers do not meet HQT standards, and examine whether or not there are particular hard-to-staff courses frequently taught by non-highly qualified teachers.
1.1 Does the revised plan include an analysis of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified? Is the analysis based on accurate classroom level data?
The table on page 5 indicates that for 2005-2006, Oklahoma has 7.13% of classes taught by non-highly-qualified teachers. The lowest percentage of classes in core academic subjects taught by highly qualified teachers is in high-poverty secondary schools at 88.10%. There is a 4.43% difference between the percentage of classes taught by highly qualified teachers in secondary classes in high poverty schools (88.10%) and low-poverty schools (92.53%) based on 2005-2006 data collection.
On the chart on page 8, Oklahoma has 7.13% of classes taught by non-highly-qualified teachers. In high poverty schools, the number of classes not taught by non-highly qualified teachers is 9, 432 (646 in general education classes and 8, 786 in special education classes). The teachers for these classes will be a priority for technical assistance and professional development.


Revised data: September 29, 2006

Number and Percentage of Classes, with breakdowns for General Education and Special Education

NOTE: In this document, 'classes' refers to 'core academic content classes'

School Type

ALL classes

Classes taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

Percentage of ALL classes taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

Classes taught by teachers that ARE NOT Highly Qualified

Percentage of ALL classes taught by teachers that ARE NOT Highly Qualified

 

Number

Number

Percentage

Number

Percentage

All Schools in State

132,298

122,844

92.85%

9,432

7.13%

Breakdown of All Classes for Elementary and Secondary Level Classes:

General Education

114,068

113,400

85.72%

646

0.49%

High-Poverty Schools

20,552

20,435

15.45%

112

0.08%

Low-Poverty Schools

43,030

42,791

32.34%

228

0.17%

Special Education

18,230

9,444

7.14%

8,786

6.64%

High-Poverty Schools

4,191

2,157

1.63%

2,034

1.54%

Low-Poverty Schools

6,241

2,895

2.19%

3,346

2.53%

Prepared by Karen Coe-Ross, 9/29/2006

(HQT_CSPR_Part1_1_5_0506_Sept06_Word.doc)


Oklahoma Accreditation Reporting Site

For the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 school years, the Oklahoma State Department of Education had a state-level data system to collect, verify, and determine the number of classes taught by highly qualified teachers at the time of state accreditation reporting. The system merged information from data sources within the OSDE including teacher testing; teacher class assignments; and teacher certification. The data system extracted the core content subject classes that require a highly qualified teacher. In addition to establishing district and school percentages of highly qualified teachers, the data was disaggregated by elementary and secondary level (including content area), poverty level, Adequate Yearly Progress determination, and school improvement status. Principals attest to the accuracy of the highly qualified teacher information and the Superintendent provides an assurance of the data submission accuracy with the certification of the online data.


Regional Accreditation Officers (RAO) Monitor Data

Oklahoma field-based Regional Accreditation Officers, employed by the OSDE, make onsite visits to every district and site to verify teacher credentials and class assignments. Verification of all district and site data is reviewed throughout the year by the 13 full-time RAOs. The RAOs monitor local schools to determine if they meet state standards and to conduct regular accreditation reviews for each district and school site statewide. Theses reviews focus on physical facilities, properly certified and assigned teachers, curriculum, attendance, budgets, class size and other legal and regulatory policies. Each RAO serves approximately 8 out of 77 counties. The RAOs have frequent training for updates related to state and federal legislation. The RAOs participate on School Support Teams to assist school sites that have not made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that are in Years 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 of School Improvement status.


2005-06 Data Entry Including Special Education Teachers

The number of classes taught by highly qualified teachers in core academic subjects was collected by State Department of Education Data Division when the Accreditation Report was entered. Principals attested to the highly qualified teacher information provided, and District Superintendents certified the information as accurate as part of online data collection. Data collected included Special Education information and HOUSSE. Oklahoma State Department of Education – Special Education Services (OSDE-SES) provided technical assistance over the telephone and through contact submissions. OSDE-SES developed and disseminated a memorandum on service delivery options (co-teaching, collaborative teaching). Videoconferences were scheduled to provide technical assistance to school districts related to submission of information for highly qualified teacher requirements and high quality professional development in March and April, 2006. Ongoing technical assistance was provided through e-mail and phone contact as well as through on-site monitoring.






Classes Taught by Teachers that ARE NOT Highly Qualified

Assignment Area

Number of Classes (Total)

Number of Classes (Charter)

Number of Classes (Elementary)

Number of Classes (Middle/Junior High)

Number of Classes (High School)

Number of Classes in High-Poverty Schools

Number of Classes in Low-Poverty Schools

(From 2004-2005 file) Number of SITES that have NOT made Adequate Yearly Progress

(From 2004-2005 file) Number of SITES that are in School Improvement

Elementary Education (Self-Contained Grades, e.g. "First Grade")

117

3

114







31

13



4

Elementary and Secondary Education:




























Fine Arts (Art)

18






1

17




4

1

1

Fine Arts (Music)

54

11



15

28

5

35

1

1

Language Arts

124

2

16

83

23

22

59

3

2

Languages

56

4

8

15

29

4

26

2

2

Mathematics

88

2

11

42

33

30

16

3

3

Reading

7




7







2







1

Science

77

1

7

38

31

9

35



1

Social Studies

105

8

24

40

33

9

40



1

Special Education

8,786

33

2,758

2,731

3,264

2,034

3,346

39

77

Total

9,432

64

2,945

2,965

3,458

2,146

3,574

39

82

























This is an UNDUPLICATED site count (a site may be included in more than one "area", but this is the actual number of sites)

This is an UNDUPLICATED site count (a site may be included in more than one "area", but this is the actual number of sites)



Special Education Revised Data Collection

Forty-eight percent of Special Education teachers are included in the 7.1% of classes not taught by a highly qualified teacher. In 2005-2006, data was collected for the first time to determine if core content classes for special education students were taught by highly qualified teachers. The data collected used a multi-subject HOUSSE for special education teachers. The USDE monitoring of Oklahoma in March, 2006 determined that Oklahoma’s multi-subject HOUSSE for special education teachers was not acceptable. Therefore, the fall data collection 2005 was not usable. The OSDE then took teacher testing data and certification data to determine which teachers had dual certification in special education and elementary education and/or early childhood education that matched their teaching assignment. This data analysis indicated that approximately 50% of special education teachers met the highly qualified requirement using the dual certification data. OSDE recognized that in addition to this 50%, future data collection would exclude special education teachers not providing direct instruction and this would increase the number of classes taught by highly qualified teachers. In addition, the future data collection would include special education teachers that use the revised HOUSSE approved by USDE in 6-22-06 response. This would also increase the number of classes taught by highly qualified teachers.


Next Steps for More Accurate Data Collection of Highly Qualified Teachers
Revision of Accreditation Application System to Eliminate Special Education as a Subject

The Teacher Assignments component of the Accreditation Application builds the source database for identifying core content classes and the teachers who teach them. The major flaw in that database, that prevented the OSDE from doing adequate analysis on the special education teachers, was that “Special Education” had been reported as a subject, regardless of the content of the class. To remedy that problem, the Teacher Assignments component of the Accreditation Application has been revised to prohibit reporting of Special Education as a subject, and to more clearly collect the subject matter taught by teachers providing direct content instruction. Separate forms for Special Education and Alternative Education teachers will supplement that information. The teacher assignments for core subject areas will serve as the assignment source for the new Highly Qualified Teacher System.


Oklahoma Web-based Educator Credentialing System (OECS)

A contract issued in June 2006, for the 2006-07 development of an Oklahoma Web-based Educator Credentialing System (OECS), will provide essential data on teachers (areas of certification, subject test results, degree, major, and National Board Certification), in a relational database than can be easily linked with other teacher systems that provide key information affecting equality: systems such as School Personnel Records, (location and type of school), Accreditation demographics of student population and Teacher Assignments (subject and number of students taught) and Student Assessment System (Adequate Yearly Progress and School Improvement status). Oklahoma’s improved capacity to accurately assess the highly qualified status of teachers in each school will provide a solid foundation for the future identification, analyses and plan for correction, of the distribution inequity of quality teachers between high-poverty and high-minority schools vs. low-poverty and low-minority schools.

1   2   3   4   5   6   7


База данных защищена авторским правом ©shkola.of.by 2016
звярнуцца да адміністрацыі

    Галоўная старонка