Hungarian Armor of cmbb




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Hungarian Armor of CMBB
Version 1.0

Copyright 2006 by Michael Dows.

This manual is presently distributed only by www.ww2steel.com , please donate!
All models and game materials shown are copyright Battlefront.com, Inc.

Reprint and other re-use without permission prohibited. All rights reserved.

Combat Mission: Barbarossa to Berlin © 2002 Battlefront.com, Inc.

This manual covers Hungarian Armor used on the East Front from June, 1941 to April 4, 1945.


Toldi I 2

Toldi IIA 3

Toldi III 4

Turan I 5

Turan I (late) 6

Turan II 7

Turan II (late) 8

Zrinyi II 9

Zrinyi II (late) 10

Nimrod 11

H-39 Hotchkiss 12

Panzer 38(t) G 13

Marder II 14

Panzer IIIM 15

Sturmgeschütz III G (early mid) 16

Panzer IV F 17

Panzer IV F2 18

Panzer IV H 19

Hetzer (JgPz 38t) 20

Panther (Panzer V A early) 21

Tiger (Pz VI E) 22

Csaba 23


Ansaldo CV-35 24

Truck 25


Note: main gun ammo loadouts will vary by date and vehicle

Ammo performance varies by date, sometimes very considerably!

The Hungarians suffered a massive defeat which forced an almost complete withdrawl in April of 1943. Many vehicles actually have two service periods.

German vehicles are slightly more expensive due to a regular command lag time of 7 seconds instead of the Hungarian 10 seconds for independent vehicles with radios.


Toldi I: (39 points)

Main Gun RPM: 9

Dates of Use: Begin – Nov’41 Jul’42 – Mar’43

Notes: Very similar to the early PzII (pre appliqué armor). Compared to the PzIIC; the Toldi I is faster and carries tons of ammo, but has less armor. The PzIIC has a higher rate of fire, and fires “bursts”. The Toldi I fires individual rounds at a 6.2 second interval. As with the PzII, it requires many penetrations of its solid AP shot to eliminate an enemy vehicle. It does acceptably versus early Soviet light armor. The tiny HE round is irrelevant against enemy guns and infantry. The radio gives the vehicle a good advantage and a fast 10 second (independant) command lag time. The vehicle is based off of the Swedish L-60B and named for a fictitious Hungarian knight. 80 Toldi I were produced. A total of 202 Toldi were produced.

Toldi IIA: (49 – 50 points, changes in the 1943 gap, perhaps due to a large AP ammo improvement)

Main Gun RPM: 7

Dates of Use: Jun’42 – Feb’43 Mar’44 – Mar’45

Notes: The Toldi IIA has been uparmored similarly to a PzIIC. Overall the 40mm AP is inferior to the Soviet 45mm gun with 1942+ ammo, and superior to German 37mm. The HE round is equivalent to the German 37mm, but sucks compared to the 14 blast of the Soviet 45mm. These tanks do not appear to have ever been built in this fashion. Rather, these are refits the Toldi II (not in game, 110 produced, thicker armor but still 20mm gun) of which 80 were remanufactured with the improved gun. These vehicles are capable only of engaging early war Soviet light armor. Up to December of 1942 it can hunt BT and T-26 tanks successfully. After the gap it can hunt the T-60 and T-70. Armored cars are always fair game. The still tiny HE blast remains practically useless against enemy guns and infantry. Picture above displays “before the ’43 gap” ammo. ‘44+ ammo is significantly better.

Toldi III: (55 points)

Main Gun RPM: 8

Dates of Use: Apr’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: Carries more main gun ammo and improved armor. Didn’t see east front service until April of 1944, which makes this tank so far past obsolete it’s not even funny. Compared to its tactical equivalent (the T-70) it is slightly inferior in firepower and armored protection… and the T-70 is the lightest vehicle still classed as a tank in the Soviet arsenal it this time. This is an acceptable light tank, but nothing more. Only 12 were produced, though CMBB rarity does not seem to reflect this accurately.


Turan I: (72 points)

Main Gun RPM: 10

Dates of Use: Apr’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: This vehicle began as the Czechoslovakian Lt-35. The differences are the 40mm (instead of 47mm) gun and uparmoring from 25mm to 50mm on the front. When that vehicle was ordered by the Cz army in 1935 it was a modern, highly capable tank. By its first combat use by the Hungarians in the spring of 1944 in western Ukraine… it was totally obsolete. This chassis is the heaviest ‘kind of’ Hungarian tank fielded (they only used foreign chassis, they had none of their own), and by the time it was fielded, it sucked. It had a similar service span to the Soviet IS-2, or the German King Tiger. It had been pulled (and largely eliminated) from German service in December of 1941 due to its growing combat inadequacies. It served in Romanian (direct competitor of Hungary over land) service until January of 1943 as the R-2. Though sources differ as usual it appears that the Hungarians produced 230 of this model in 1941-‘42, totaling 369 Turan.

Turan I (late) : (73 points)

Main Gun RPM: 10

Dates of Use: Jun’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: Don’t let the cool looking skirts fool you. This tank did not see service until June of 1944… same as the King Tiger. It is capable of engaging only light tanks, and is not particularly effective even at that. Too bad, since the LT-35 it was designed from was such a nice tank, even if somewhat unreliable.

Turan II : (80 points)

Main Gun RPM: 7

Dates of Use: Apr’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: Very similar to the previous Turan I, with the exception of the awkwardly mounted 75mm L/25. This vehicle is tactically similar to a PzIVF, except that the Hungarians did not get it into the field until mid ’44, whereas the PzIVF went in with Barbarossa, and was incapable of dealing with heavier Soviet armor even then. This 75mm gun is very similar in performance to its German equivalent, but carries no shaped charge round, which is required to tackle any 1944 medium to heavy armor. Despite their best attempts, this vehicle by its service life is still only capable of engaging light armor or infantry. While carrying a gun sufficient to take on enemy AT guns, the armor is just too thin to attempt it. 139 Turan II were produced before Hungary was removed from the war. This chassis is the basis for the Zrinyi assault gun.

Turan II (late) : (81 points)

Main Gun RPM: 7

Dates of Use: Jun’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: A Turan II with skirts added.

Zrinyi II: (119 points)

Main Gun RPM: 4

Dates of Use: Apr’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: This vehicle I consider to be a quality design, even for its late war service. The 75mm armor is acceptable and on par with German and Soviet equipment of similar role. The gun is Hungarian made, but is very close in performance to the German 10.5cm L/28, or at least the hollow charge ammo is. This hollow charge ammo is capable of eliminating any vehicle based on the T-34 chassis or an ISU, but the T-44 and IS tanks will prove challenging. Most impressive is that these vehicles carry a rough average of 35% of its ammo in HEAT! Firing a round every 14.9 seconds (faster than many Soviet ‘heavies’) gives it a good advantage. Though slow and inaccurate, the power of this round often completely annihilates its target. Unfortunately, only 60 of this vehicle were produced. The late war armor crew uniform is shown here. The Zrinyi I was armed with a 75mm L/43, but never passed prototype stage. It is named after Nikolaus Graf Zrinyi, a Hungarian who fought the Turks in 1566.

Zrinyi II (late) : (119 points)

Main Gun RPM: 4

Dates of Use: Jun’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: Same as above, with skirts.

Nimrod: (55 – 56 points, due to ammo changes before and after service gap)

Main Gun RPM: 13

Dates of Use: Jul’42 – Mar’43 Apr’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: Ammo shown above is ‘pre-gap’. Post-gap AP ammo is solid shot with better penetration, but less post penetrative effect, and presumably less effect versus aircraft. It was originally intended as a dual role AT/AA platform, but it was soon realized that it sucked as an AT weapon. Regardless, it is efficient at killing light armor, but due to its own thin armor it is just as efficient at getting killed. The open top makes it easy prey for enemy aircraft, which tests indicate that it is not particularly effective at eliminating or driving off. It fires three rounds in a burst (only taking 1 round off of the total), every 4.3 seconds. The turret and gun are quite cool looking. 135 were built. It is based off of the Swedish L-62 tank chassis.

H-39 Hotchkiss: (38 points)

Main Gun RPM: 7

Dates of Use: Mar’42 – Sep’42

Notes: This Hungarian tank is slightly cheaper than the German version which costs 40 points. It was worthless on the east front in German service, and the Germans apparently sold the Hungarians an unknown (to me) number of these tanks. I was unable to find much information at this time on this tank while in Hungarian service.

Panzer 38(t) G: (61 points)

Main Gun RPM: 10

Dates of Use: Jul’42 – Mar’43

Notes: Identical to the German vehicle which costs 69 points. Only known difference is command lag. 102 vehicles were transferred to the Hungarians from the Germans, but I do not know if they were sold, traded, or donated.

Marder II: (68 points)

Main Gun RPM: 5

Dates of Use: Jan & Feb ‘43

Notes: The German vehicle costs 71 – 72 points. I was unable to find information at this time on the Hungarian use of this vehicle, but they must have been few in number. Like everything else, they appear to have been annihilated in early spring of 1943.


Panzer IIIM: (110 points)

Main Gun RPM: 9

Dates of Use: Sep’42 – Mar’43

Notes: 114 Points in German service. Only 10 appear to have been transferred, eliminated in spring ’43.

Sturmgeschütz III G (early mid) : (103 points)

Main Gun RPM: 6

Dates of Use: May’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: 114 Points in German service. Only 40 appear to have been transferred.


Panzer IV F: (104 points)

Main Gun RPM: 6

Dates of Use: Jul’42 – Mar’43

Notes: 109 Points in German service. Only a total of 32 F & F2 appear to have been transferred, eliminated in spring ’43.

Panzer IV F2: (122 points)

Main Gun RPM: 6

Dates of Use: Aug’42 – Mar’43

Notes: 127 Points in German service. Only a total of 32 F & F2 appear to have been transferred, eliminated in spring ’43.

Panzer IV H: (129 points)

Main Gun RPM: 6

Dates of Use: May’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: 134 Points in German service. 62 appear to have been transferred.

Hetzer (JgPz 38t) : (95 points)

Main Gun RPM: 5

Dates of Use: Oct’44 – Apr’45 (End)

Notes: 100 appear to have been transferred to Hungary (some sources say 75).


Panther (Panzer V A early): (220 points)

Main Gun RPM: 7

Dates of Use: Sep’44 – Feb’45

Notes: 238 – 241 points in German service. Only 5 appear to have been transferred to Hungary. CMBB’s rarity system is certainly not reflecting this.

Tiger (Pz VI E): (195 points)

Main Gun RPM: 5

Dates of Use: Jun’44 – Sep’44

Notes: 203 points in German service. Only 3 appear to have been transferred to Hungary. CMBB’s rarity system is certainly not accurately reflecting this one either.

Csaba: (36 points)

Main Gun RPM: 12

Dates of Use: Begin - Apr’45 (End)

Notes: Interestingly, Csaba is in legend the name of a son of Attila the Hun, and pronounced CHAW-baw. In the legend he is going to ride down with his warriors from the Milky way and save his people (some of which supposedly became Hungarians) from problems. Obviously, I doubt he would ride down in this armored car though. This vehicle is fairly large, nearly the size of the German 8 wheeled armored cars. The 2cm gun is single shot, but can be loaded and fired quickly in the 2 man turret. Not exactly sure of crew arrangement, as there is a driver, a rear facing driver, and two men in the turret, but it is only indicated 3 crewmen here, which checks in research. Interestingly, the engine is a 90hp Ford 3.6L, but it was build in Köln, Germany.

Ansaldo CV-35: (40 points)

Main Gun RPM: n/a

Dates of Use: Begin – Nov’41

Notes: This vehicle is clearly… tiny. It carries a staggering amount of MG ammo, though, for its twin MGs. 104 of these CV-35s were purchased from Italy. The Italian CV-33 in the game uses the same graphic, and the only data difference is that it carries a single MG and 152 ‘ammo’.

Truck: (25 points)

Main Gun RPM: n/a

Dates of Use: Begin - Apr’45 (End)



Notes: A normal German truck with two ‘Garians sitting in it.




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