Genomic data of the following 7 birds have been previously released in GigaDB




Дата канвертавання19.04.2016
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Supplementary Materials for

Genomic Data of the Avian Phylogenomics Project

Guojie Zhang, Bo Li, Cai Li, M Thomas P. Gilbert, Erich D. Jarvis, The Avian Genome Consortium, Jun Wang



Genomic data of the following 7 birds have been previously released in GigaDB:

Pekin duck - http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/101001

Peregrine falcon - http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/101006

Emperor penguin - http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/100005

Adelie penguin - http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/100006

Pigeon - http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/100007

Medium ground finch - http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/100040

Budgerigar - http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/100059


Basic description of genomic data of other birds:

Genomic data of the Little Egret (Egretta garzetta).

The Little Egret (Egretta garzetta (Linnaeus, 1766)) is a small white heron. An adult's average size is 55–65 cm long with an 88–106 cm wingspan, and weighs 350–550 grams. Little egret's are mostly silent birds, but make various croaking and bubbling calls at their breeding colonies and produce a harsh alarm call when disturbed. 


These data have been produced as part of project on deciphering the genomics of near extinction events, with the egret as a control species for the Ibis. DNA from a male in the Southern Qinling Mountains, Yangxian County Reserve, China. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 74X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.2 Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 24 kb and 3.1Mb respectively. We identified 16,585 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 18.6 kb.

Genomic data of the Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon).

The Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon (Temminck, 1855)) is the only member of the genus Nipponia and also known as the Japanese Crested Ibis (Toki). Originally widespread across China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Russia, the species by 1988 had disappeared from nearly all these places, except two surviving breeding pairs in Southern Qinling mountains of Yangxian County, China. 


DNA was from a female that descended from one of these pairs, belonging to a population now rescued from near extinction. We sequenced the 1.6 Gb genome to a depth of approximately 105X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences totaled 1.17 Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 22kb and 5.4Mb respectively. We identified 16,756 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 19.4 kb.

Genomic data of the Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna).

The Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna (Lesson, 1829)) is a medium-sized hummingbird native to the west coast of North America and is the only North American hummingbird species with a red crown. It belongs to one of the rare groups of vocal learning birds. The bird was named after Anna Massena, Duchess of Rivoli. 


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from from a female, which was caught in Portland, Oregan, USA by Claudio Mello and Pete Lovell. We sequenced the 1 Gb genome to a depth of approximately 110X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.1Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 23 kb and 4Mb respectively. We identified 16,000 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 18.5kb.
Genomic data of the Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)

The Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica (Linnaeus, 1758)) is a bird belonging to the swift family Apodidae. Like their namesake, swifts are among the fastest flying birds. The Chimney swift is often described as a sociable species, seldom seen alone and. 


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered tissue sample (B-21727) from the Louisiana State University Museum, of a female caught in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 103X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.1Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 27 kb and 3.8Mb respectively. We identified 15,373 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 19.8kb.
Genomic data of the Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus).

The Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus vociferus (Linnaeus, 1758)) is a medium-sized plover (a wading bird belonging to the subfamily Charadriinae), and often uses a "broken wing act" to distract predators from their nests. 


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered tissue sample (B-66055) from the Louisiana State University Museum, of a female, subspecies peruvianus, caught in Loreto, Peru. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 100X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.2 Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 32 kb and 3.6Mb respectively. We identified 16,860 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 19.1kb.
Genomic data of the American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos).

The American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos brachyrhynchos (Brehm, 1822)) is a large passerine bird and part of the Corvidae family. It is commonly found throughout North America, and despite being common and widespread, they are highly susceptible to West Nile Virus. 


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a female in the Asheboro, North Carolina Zoo, USA, with blood samples provided by Halley Buckanoff of the zoo. We sequenced the 1.26Gb genome to a depth of approximately 80X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.1Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 24kb and 6.9Mb respectively. We identified 16,562 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 17.9kb.
Genomic data of the Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus canorus).

The Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus canorus (Linnaeus, 1758)), also known as the European Cuckoo, is a widespread summer migrant to Europe and Asia. It is a brood parasite, meaning it lays eggs in other birds' nests; particularly in Dunnock's, Meadow Pipit's, and Eurasian Reed Warbler's nests. 


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male collected in Denmark; voucher 137750 in the Natural History Museum of Denmark. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 100X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.15Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 31kb and 3Mb respectively. We identified 15,889 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 20kb.
Genomic data of the Golden-collared Manakin (Manacus vitellinus).

The Golden-collared Manakin (Manacus vitellinus (Gould, 1843)) belongs to the Pipridae family of suboscine passseriform birds. It is commonly found in Colombia, Costa Rica and Panama. 


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male obtained in Gamboa, Panama, with the sample obtained by Barney Schlinger of UCLA. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 110X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.12Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 34kb and 2.5Mb respectively. We identified 15,285 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 18.8kb.
Genomic data of the Hoazin (Opisthocomus hoazin).

The Hoazin (Opisthocomus hoazin (Statius Müller, 1776)) is a pheasant-sized tropical bird found in swamps, forest and mangroves of the Amazon and Orinoco Delta in South America. It is known by other names, such as the Hoactzin, Stinkbird or Canje Pheasant and is notable for having chicks that possess claws on two of their wings.


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a female obtained in Lagunas, Venezuela, with the sample obtained by Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello of the University of Puerto Rico. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 100X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.14Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 24kb and 2.9Mb respectively. We identified 15,702 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 20kb.

Genomic data of the Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens).

The Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens (Linnaeus, 1766)) is the smallest of its kind in North America. It uses a number of vocalizations, including a short 'pik' call and produces a slow drumming sound while it pecks into trees compared with other North American woodpeckers.


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered tissue sample (B-21955) from the Louisiana State University Museum, of a female caught in Marcum Mountain, Cowell County, Montana, USA. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 105X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.17Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 20kb and 2Mb respectively. We identified 15,576 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 20kb.

Genomic data of the Ostrich (Struthio camelus australis).

The Southern Ostrich (Struthio camelus australis (J.H. Gurney, 1868)) is a sub-species of The Common Ostrich (Struthio camelus) and found in southern Africa, south of the Zambezi and Cunene rivers. It is a flightless bird native to Africa and the only living member of the genus, Struthio. The Ostrich is farmed throughout the world for its meat, feathers and leather. 


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a female at the San Diego Zoo in California by Oliver Ryder, of an animal originally from Botswana, Africa (ISIS ID: 202443). We sequenced the 2.16Gb genome to a depth of approximately 85X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.23Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 29kb and 3.5Mbrespectively. We identified 16,178 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 19.5kb.

Genomic data of the White-throated Tinamou (Tinamus guttatus).

The White-throated Tinamou (Tinamus guttatus (Pelzeln, 1863)) is a native bird to the Amazon rain forest in Brazil, southern Venezuela, eastern Peru, northern Bolivia, southeastern Colombia and northeastern Ecuador. It belongs to the Tinamidae family, and eats fruit off the ground or low-lying bushes, as well as flower buds, invertebrates, seeds and leaves. 


These data have been produced as part of the G10K and Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered tissue sample (B-42614) from the Louisiana State University Museum, of a female caught in Loreto, Peru.in the Loreto Department, Peru. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 100X with short reads from a series of libraries with various insert sizes (170bp, 500bp, 800bp, 2kb, 5kb, 10kb and 20kb). 
The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.05Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 24kb and 242kb respectively. We identified 15,788 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 14.7kb.

Genomic data of the Rifleman (Acanthisitta chloris).

The Rifleman (Acanthisitta chloris (Sparrman, 1787)) is an endemic bird to New Zealand and is also known as New Zealand wrens, or Tītipounamu in Maori. It belongs to the Acanthisittidae family, and is one of two surviving species. The Rifleman is named after a colonial New Zealand regiment because its plumage is similar to the military uniform of a rifleman.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from an animal found dead after in earthquake in Kaikoura, South Island, New Zealand, with tissue provided by Mike Bunce and Paul Scofield. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 29X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.05 Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 18kb and 64kb respectively. We identified 14,596 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.5kb.

Genomic data of the Bar-tailed trogon (Apaloderma vittatum).

The Bar-tailed trogon (Apaloderma vittatum (Shelley, 1882)) belongs to the Trogonidae family of birds and lives in forests at a preferred altitude of around 1600 metres, and who's vocalisations are described "a yelping crescendo". It is found in several African countries - Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, and Kenya, to name a few. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered tissue sample (Cat# 140150) from the Natural History Museum of Denmark, of a male collected in the Udzungwa mountains of Tanzania. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 28X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.08Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 19kb and 56kb respectively. We identified 13,615 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.5kb.

Genomic data of the Grey Crowned Crane (Balearica regulorum gibbericeps).

The Grey Crowned Crane (Balearica regulorum gibbericeps (Reichenow, 1892)) belongs to the Gruidae family of birds and can be found in the dry African savannah south of the Sahara, as well as in the wetter areas and grassy flatlands near lakes and rivers in Uganda and Kenya. The Crowned crane performs an interesting display when breeding that involves dancing, bowing, and jumping, as well as a booming call that involves inflation of a red gular sac on its throat. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male at the Copenhagen Zoo (originally born Givskud Zoo) in Denmark, of an animal tended to by Mads Bertelsen. We sequenced the 1.45Gb genome to a depth of approximately 33X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.14Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 18kb and 51kb respectively. We identified 14,173 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.8kb.

Genomic data of the Javan Rhinoceros Hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros silvestris).

The Javan Rhinoceros Hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros silvestris (Vieillot, 1816)) is a sub species of the Rhinoceros Hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros), one of the world's largest hornbills that has lived in captivity for over 90 years. It is found it lowland and tropical and sub-tropical mountain rainforests in Borneo, Sumatra, Java, the Malay Peninsula, Singapore and southern Thailand. It is also the state bird of the Malaysian state Sarawak. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male who had lived at the Copenhagen Zoo (originally born wild) in Denmark, of an animal tended to by Mads Bertelsen. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 35X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.08Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 14kb and 51kb respectively. We identified 13,873 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.5kb.

Genomic data of the Chuck-will's-widow (Antrostomus carolinensis).

The Chuck-will's-widow (Antrostomus carolinensis (J.F. Gmelin, 1789)) is a nocturnal bird and part of the Caprimulgidae family. It's name is derived from a continuous repetitive song often heard at night, and is often confused with Whippoorwills due to their similar calls and unusual names.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered tissue sample (B-3403) from the Louisiana State University Museum, of a male caught in East Jetty Woods, Cameron Parish, Louisiana, USA. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 30X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.15Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 17kb and 45kb respectively. We identified 14,676 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 12kb.

Genomic data of the Red-legged Seriema (Cariama cristata).

The Red-legged Seriema (Cariama cristata (Linnaeus, 1766)) is a predatory terrestial bird in the Cariamidae family. It is also known as the Crested Cariama. It is found in the grasslands of Brazil, south of the Amazon to Uruguay and northern Argentina. The Red-legged Seriema has a song described to sound like a cross between a bark of a young dog and a clucking of turkeys. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male (left leg band # 295951) who had lived at the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark (originally born in Noorder Dierenpark [Emmen Zoo] Holland), of an animal tended to by Mads Bertelsen. We sequenced the 1.5Gb genome to a depth of approximately 24X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.15Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 17kb and 54kb respectively. We identified 14,216 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.7kb.

Genomic data of the Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura).

The Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura aura (Linnaeus, 1758)), also known as the Turkey Buzzard in North America, is the most widespread vulture species. It lives in a range of open and semi-open areas, such as shrublands, sub-tropical forests and pastures. The Turkey Vulture is a scavanger, feeding exclusively on carrion - it flies low using its keen eye and sense of smell to detect the gases produced during the decay of dead animals. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected collected from a female in the Carolina Raptor Center, in Huntersville, North Carolina, USA (originally wild caught in North Carolina), with blood samples provided by Dave Scott of the Center. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 25X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.17Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 12kb and 35kb respectively. We identified 13,534 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 10.8kb.

Genomic data of the Macqueen's Bustard (Chlamydotis macqueenii).

The Macqueen's Bustard (Chlamydotis macqueenii (J.E. Gray, 1832)) is a large bird that breeds in southwest Asia in deserts and similarly arid sandy areas. It has recently split as a separate species from the Houbara Bustard of the Canary Islands and Africa, and one difference is that the MacQueen's Bustard has a tendancy to wander compared with the Houbara.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA collected from a male in the Dubai Falcon Hospital (originally wild caught), with blood samples provided by Tom Bailey of the Hospital. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 27X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.09Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 18kb and 45kb respectively. We identified 13,582 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 12.9kb.

Genomic data of the Speckled Mousebird (Colius striatus).

The Speckled Mousebird (Colius striatus (Gmelin, 1789)) is the largest species of mousebird and named because of its overall mousey-brown colour. The bird can be found from Cameroon to Eritrea and Ethiopia, and southern South Africa. Described as a noisy creature, it is not however, known for its voice, and is a rather social bird often observed feeding in groups. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male at the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, of an animal tended to by Mads Bertelsen, now vouchered (138165) at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 27X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.08Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 18kb and 45kb respectively. We identified 13,538 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 12.4kb.

Genomic data of the Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias helias).

The Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias helias (Pallas, 1781)) is the sole member of the family Eurypygidae and is found in Central to South America from Mexico, Peru to Brazil. It has similar morphological features to the Kagu of New Caledonia and is a non-migrant bird that is normally found on the ground scratching for insects. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a female from the Odense Zoo in Denmark, of an animal obtained by Mads Bertelsen. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 33X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.1Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 16kb and 46kb respectively. We identified 13,974 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 12.3kb.

Genomic data of the Northern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis glacialis).

The Northern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis glacialis (Linnaeus, 1761)), also known as Fulmar or Arctic Fulmar, is a highly abundant sea bird and commonly found in north Pacific and north Atlantic subarctic regions. It is a member of the Procellariidae family, which include petrels and shearwaters, and like other petrels, the Northern Fulmar's walking ability is limited but is a very a strong flier. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered sample (137838) of Natural History Museum of Denmark from a male caught in Denmark. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 33X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.14Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 17kb and 46kb respectively. We identified 14,306 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 12.8kb.

Genomic data of the Red-throated Loon (Gavia stellata).

The Red-throated Loon (Gavia stellata (Pontoppidan, 1763)), also known as the Red-throated Diver, is a migratory aquatic bird that breeds mainly in the Arctic regions and spends winters in the northern coastal waters. The Red-throated loon has a large global population, making it the most widely distributed member of the Gaviidae (Loon or Diver) family.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered sample (137940) of Natural History Museum of Denmark from a male caught in Denmark. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 33X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.15Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 16kb and 45kb respectively. We identified 13,454 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.2kb.

Genomic data of the White tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla groenlandicus).

The White tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla groenlandicus (C.L. Brehm, 1831)) is one of the largest birds of prey belonging to the Accipitridae family and is considered a close cousin of the Bald Eagle. The White-tailed eagle is a large bird with a wingspan that measures 1.78–2.45 m, and is an apex predator, meaning it is a predator with no predators of its own. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered sample (137926) of Natural History Museum of Denmark from a male caught in Greenland. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 26X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.14Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 20kb and 56kb respectively. We identified 13,831 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 14.2kb.

Genomic data of the Cuckoo Roller (Leptosomus discolor).

The Cuckoo Roller (Leptosomus discolor discolor (Hermann, 1783)) is the sole bird of the order Leptosomiformes within the superorder Coraciimorphae - that includes kingfishers, rollers and bee-eaters. It is a medium-large bird that inhabits forests and woodlands in Madagascar and the Comoro Islands. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a female at Weltvogelpark, in Walsrode, Germany, of a male tended to by Andreas Frei of the Zoo. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 32X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.15Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 19kb and 61kb respectively. We identified 14,831 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.9kb.

Genomic data of the Northern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicus).

The Northern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicus nubicus (J.F. Gmelin, 1788)) is part of the bee-eater family, Meropidae, and is also known as the Nubian bee-eater. It is a brightly-coloured bird and feeds primarily on bees and other flying insects, such as grasshoppers and locusts. 


These data have been produced as part of the avian phylogenomisc project. DNA from a female from the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, of an animal tended by Mads Bertelsen; now vouchered (137942) in the Natural History Museum of Denmark. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 37X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.06Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 20kb and 47kb respectively. We identified 13,467 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13kb.

Genomic data of the Brown Mesite (Mesitornis unicolor).

The Brown Mesite (Mesitornis unicolor (Des Murs, 1845)) is a ground-dwelling bird native to Madagascar, and is one of three species of the Mesitornithidae family. It is a medium-sized terrestial bird that inhabits humid forests and prefers lower elevations - making it a vunerable population.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered sample (345610) of the Chicago Field Museum (via David Williard) in Chicago from a female caught in Fivondronana de Tolagnaro, Toliara, Madagascar. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 29X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.1Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 18kb and 46kb respectively. We identified 15,371 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 11.4kb.

Genomic data of the Kea (Nestor notabilis).

The Kea (Nestor notabilis (Gould, 1856)) is known as the cheeky parrot of New Zealand and is a large bird belonging to the superfamily Strigopoidea. It inhabits the alpine regions of the South Island of New Zealand and is known for its intelligence and curiosity - they can solve logical puzzles and can push and pull things in order to get food. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male at the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, of an animal tended by Mads Bertelsen, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 16kb and 37kb respectively. We identified 14,074 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 14.4kb.

Genomic data of the Dalmatian Pelican (Pelecanus crispus).

The Dalmatian Pelican (Pelecanus crispus (Bruch, 1832)) is a large bird, measuring from 160 -183 cm in length, 9–15 kg in weight and 290–351 cm in wingspan. This species breeds from southern Europe to India and China and is found in lakes, rivers, deltas and estuaries. Unlike with the Great White Pelican, The Dalmatian Pelican is not tied to lowland areas and will move and nest in suitable wetlands at a variety of elevations. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male at the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, of an animal tended by Mads Bertelsen, now vouchered (105271) at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 34X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.17Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 18kb and 43kb respectively. We identified 14,813 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 11.9kb.

Genomic data of the White-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon lepturus ascensionis).

The White-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon lepturus ascensionis (Mathews, 1915)) is the smallest of three closely related seabirds in the order Phaethontiformes and can be found in the tropical Atlantic, western Pacific and Indian Oceans. For a small bird, this species can travel far across oceans when not breeding. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA from collected from a vouchered tissue sample (135885) from the Natural History Museum of Denmark, of a female caught on Ascension Island, South Atlantic. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 39X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.16Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 18kb and 47kb respectively. We identified 14,970 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 12.7kb.

Genomic data of the Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis).

The Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis (Blumenbach, 1798)) is a widespread member of the cormorant family and is known by several different names around the world - the Great Black Comorant across the Northern Hemisphere, Black Shag in New Zealand, the Black Cormorant in Australia and the Large Cormorant in India. It is a large black bird that can be distinguished from the Common Shag by its larger size, heavier build and thicker bill. They are mostly silent birds but can produce various guttural noises in their breeding colonies.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered tissue sample (137943) at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, of a male caught in Gedser, Denmark. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 24X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.15Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 15kb and 48kb respectively. We identified 13,479 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.5kb.

Genomic data of the American Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber ruber).

The Caribbean Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber ruber (Linnaeus, 1758)) is a sub-species of, and commonly referred to as the American Flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber). The Caribbean Flamingo is found generally throughout the Caribbean and is a non-migratory bird (those that do migrate only move between summer and winter breeding grounds). It is a largely social bird that breeds in huge colonies, and is a homeothermic endotherm - an animal that keeps a consistent temperature that is regulated within its body.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male (leg band GWX) who had lived at the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, of an animal tended to by Mads Bertelsen. We sequenced the 1.24Gb genome to a depth of approximately 33X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.14Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 16kb and 37kb respectively. We identified 14,024 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 11.7kb.

Genomic data of the Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus cristatus).

The Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus cristatus (Linnaeus, 1758)) is known for its elaborate mating display and is the largest member of the Grebe family in the Old World. In the 19th century, the species was almost hunted to extinction in the UK for its head plumes, which were used to decorate hats and other female attire.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a vouchered tissue sample (137837) at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, of a male caught in Denmark. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 30X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.15Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 13kb and 30kb respectively. We identified 13,913 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 10.4kb.

Genomic data of the Yellow-throated Sandgrouse (Pterocles gutturalis).

The Yellow-throated Sandgrouse (Pterocles gutturalis saturatior (E. Hartert, 1900)) is a member of the Pteroclididae family (ground dwelling birds restricted to treeless, open country) and can be found in many countries in southern and eastern Africa.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male at the Sharjah Breeding Center in the United Arab Emirates tended by An Pas, of a wild caught animal in Tanzania. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 25X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.07Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 17kb and 49kb respectively. We identified 13,867 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 12.8kb.

Genomic data of the Angola Turaco (Tauraco erythrolophus).

The Red-crested Turaco (Tauraco erythrolophus (Vieillot, 1819)) is a group of African near-passerines endemic to western Angola. It's call has been described to be somewhat like a jungle monkey.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project. DNA was collected from a male (leg band LDF577) who lived at the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, of an animal tended to by Mads Bertelsen. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 30X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.17Gb, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 18kb and 55kb respectively. We identified 15,435 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.2kb.

Genomic data of the Barn Owl (Tyto alba).

The Barn Owl (Tyto alba guttata (C.L. Brehm, 1831)) is the most widespread bird of its kind found almost anywhere in the world except in polar and desert regions, and is also referred to as the Common Barn Owl. Contrary to other owls, the Barn Owl does not hoot but produces an ear-shattering scream-like sound. 


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project . DNA was collected from a female breed in the laboratory of Eric Knudsen at Stanford, USA (tissue sample provided by Alex Goddard). We sequenced the 1.6Gb genome to a depth of approximately 27XThe assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.14G, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 13K and 51K respectively. We identified 13613 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 13.8kb.
Genomic data of the Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Linnaeus, 1766)) is a bird of prey found in North America.


These data have been produced as part of the Avian Phylogenomics Project . DNA was collected from a male breed from NC Raptor Center, Huntersville NC, USA and the seqencing was conducted at WUSTL. We sequenced the genome to a depth of approximately 88X. The assembled scaffolds of high quality sequences total 1.26G, with the contig and scaffold N50 values of 10K and 670K respectively. We identified 16526 protein-coding genes with a mean length of 19kb.


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