Flora and Fauna Assessment 38-42 Mainsail Drive, St Leonards Prepared for: Barwon Water Table of Contents



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Flora and Fauna Assessment
38-42 Mainsail Drive, St Leonards
Prepared for:

Barwon Water

Table of Contents


Document Information 2

Document Control 2

Summary 4

1Introduction 5

1.1Project Background 5

1.2Objectives 5

1.3Site Description 5



Figure 1 – Site Location 6

2Methodology 7

1.4Species Information 7

1.5Desktop Assessment 7

1.6Field Assessment 7

1.7Biodiversity Assessment Guidelines 8

1.8Limitations 8



3Results 10

1.9Ecological Vegetation Classes 10

1.10Vegetation Condition 10

1.11Flora 10

1.12Threatened Flora Species 10

1.13Fauna 11

1.14Threatened Fauna Species 11

1.15Significant Ecological Communities 11



Figure 2 – Ecological Values within the Site 11

4Environmental Legislation and Policy Implications 12

1.16Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 12

1.17Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 12

1.18Planning and Environment Act 1987 13

1.19Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 14

5Conclusion 15

6Plates 16

7References 17

9Appendices 19

Appendix 1 – Likelihood of Occurrence 19

Appendix 2 – Flora Survey Results 20

Appendix 3 – Threatened Flora Records 22

Figure 3 – Threatened Flora Records 23

Appendix 4 – Fauna Species Results 24

Appendix 5 – Threatened Fauna Records 25

Figure 4 – Threatened Fauna Records 27




Document Information

Flora and Fauna Assessment

38-42 Mainsail Drive, St Leonards
Report prepared by Okologie Consulting for Barwon Water
Okologie Consulting

24 Swamp Gum Drive

Torquay, Victoria, 3228
ABN: 61 702 853 196

www.okologie.com.au


Document Control





Version

Review

Approval

Date

M223_Mainsail_Drive_Assessment_Report_18032015_V1

Luke Hynes



18/03/2015


© Okologie Consulting

This document was prepared for the sole use of the party identified on the cover sheet and may only be used for the purposes for which it was commissioned in accordance with the Terms of the Engagement. This document is subject to copyright and no section or element of this document may be removed, reproduced, electronically stored or transmitted in any form without the prior written permission of Okologie Consulting.


Disclaimer

Okologie Consulting has taken all necessary steps to ensure that an accurate document has been prepared in accordance with relevant legislation and current industry best practice. Okologie Consulting accepts no liability for any damages or loss incurred as a result of reliance placed upon the report content or for any purpose other than that for which it was intended.


Summary

Okologie Consulting was engaged by Barwon Water to undertake a flora and fauna assessment for the property at 38-42 Mainsail Drive, St Leonards, Victoria.


The site is proposed for residential subdivision and the assessment was required to ascertain the presence/absence of ecological values and inform legislative and planning requirements for future development of the site.
The site was highly modified and comprised planted native vegetation around the boundary, interspersed with exotic vegetation in cleared areas and surrounding site infrastructure. Remnant native vegetation was limited to a scattered cover (<5%) of shrubs and grasses under planted vegetation.
Forty one flora species and 20 fauna species were recorded during the field assessment, with the majority of these species common to the local area. No listed threatened flora or fauna species were recorded, and none are considered likely to occur due to the absence of suitable habitat within the site.
No matters of National Environmental Significance (i.e. species habitats and ecological communities) are likely to be impacted by future development of the site; therefore, a referral under the Environment Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 is not required.
A permit application is required for the removal, destruction or lopping of native vegetation (i.e. scattered native shrubs and grasses) under Clause 52.17 of the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme. However, an assessment under the Permitted clearing of native vegetation – Biodiversity assessment guidelines is not required, as the site does not support any remnant patches or scattered indigenous trees. A planning permit is not required to remove planted native or exotic trees on the site (if required for removal).

1Introduction




    1. Project Background

Okologie Consulting was engaged by Barwon Water to undertake a flora and fauna assessment for the property at 38-42 Mainsail Drive, St Leonards, Victoria.


The site is currently used as a water storage facility and is proposed for a planning scheme amendment for rezoning to General Residential Zone 2, and a planning permit application to enable a 2-3 lot residential subdivision. The flora and fauna assessment was required to ascertain the presence/absence of ecological values, and inform legislative and planning requirements for future development of the site.

    1. Objectives

The objectives of the assessment were to:




  • Identify and assess terrestrial ecological values (i.e. vegetation communities, flora and fauna species and associated habitats) within the site.

  • Ensure ecological values are identified in the early planning phase.

  • Identify environmental legislation and policy requirements.



    1. Site Description

The site is located at 38-42 Mainsail Drive, St Leonards. It covers approximately 0.28 hectares and is bounded by Pearl Bay Passage to the north, Mainsail Drive to the east, Harbour Way to the south and private property to the west (Figure 1). The site topography was relatively flat, with a residential development in the immediate surrounds.


The Biodiversity Interactive Map shows the site occurs within the Otway Plain bioregion, the City of Greater Geelong municipality and the Corangamite Catchment Management Authority boundary. The Native Vegetation Location Risk mapping shows the site occurs within Location A (DELWP 2015).
The site consists of two parcels (Lot Res2 PS526864), with the larger parcel zoned Public Utility Zone 1 (PUZ1), and the smaller parcel zone General Residential Zone – Schedule 2 under the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme. It is not subject to any environmental overlays (DTPLI 2015).

Figure 1 – Site Location



2Methodology




    1. Species Information

Scientific and common names of flora species follow the Australian Plant Census (Australian National Botanic Gardens 2012). The names of terrestrial vertebrate fauna follow the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas (VBA) (DELWP 2015b). Vegetation community names follow the Ecological Vegetation Class (EVC) bioregion benchmarks (DELWP 2015a).


Native flora and fauna species referred to as ‘threatened’ refers to:


  • Conservation status in Australia: listed as critically endangered, endangered or vulnerable under the Environment Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

  • Conservation status in Victoria: listed as critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable or rare on Victoria’s rare or threatened flora and fauna advisory lists (DSE 2005; 2013).

  • Listed as Threatened under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG Act).



    1. Desktop Assessment

The desktop assessment included review of relevant databases and other resources, including:




  • Biodiversity Interactive Map for modelled biodiversity data (DELWP 2015a).

  • The VBA for threatened flora and fauna species records (DELWP 2015b).

  • The Protected Matters Search Tool (PMST) for information relating to matters of National Environmental Significance (NES) (listed species and communities) under the EPBC Act (DOE 2015).

  • Planning Schemes Online for planning information (DTPLI 2015).

  • Relevant environmental legislation, policies and strategies.

  • Previous reports for the site.



    1. Field Assessment

The field assessment was undertaken on 11 March 2015. The weather was warm and clear, with a temperature of 25°C (BOM 2015). The assessment involved traversing the entire site and surrounding areas on foot to identify ecological values. A list of all observed flora and fauna species, and associated habitats were documented during the assessment. The extent of native vegetation was mapped onto an aerial photograph and with a hand held GPS (accuracy ± five metres), with coordinates recorded to GDA 94 (WGS 84). EVCs were determined by reference to the relevant bioregion pre-1750 and extant EVC mapping and benchmarks descriptions (DELWP 2015a), and review of remnant vegetation in the local area. Native vegetation in the area was classified and mapped according to the definitions of the Permitted clearing of native vegetation – Biodiversity assessment guidelines (the Guidelines) (DEPI 2013a).



    1. Biodiversity Assessment Guidelines

The Guidelines (DEPI 2013a) outline how impacts on biodiversity should be considered when assessing a permit application to remove, lop or destroy native vegetation under Clause 52.17.


The objective for permitted clearing of native vegetation is that it results in no net loss, or a neutral impact on Victoria’s biodiversity. This is achieved in part by either avoiding or minimising native vegetation removal, so that all or some of the removal of native vegetation does not occur. When native vegetation removal is permitted, an offset must be secured which achieves a no net loss outcome for biodiversity. To achieve this the offset makes a contribution to Victoria’s biodiversity that is equivalent to the contribution made by the native vegetation that was removed (DEPI 2013a).

Under the Guidelines native vegetation is classified as a remnant patch or scattered tree.


A remnant patch of native vegetation (measure in hectares) is either:

  • An area of native vegetation1, with or without trees, where at least 25 per cent of the total perennial understorey plant cover is native plants.

  • An area with three or more indigenous canopy trees where the tree canopy cover is at least 20 per cent.

Scattered tree



  • An indigenous canopy tree2 that does not form part of a remnant patch (DEPI 2013).

There are three risk-based pathways for assessing an application to remove native vegetation: low, medium and high. The risk-based pathway is determined by considering the extent and location risk of the vegetation to be removed (DEPI 2013a).



    1. Limitations

The preferred survey period for undertaking flora assessments in Victoria is spring, which maximises the likelihood of detecting all flora species within a site. While autumn is still considered adequate for a general flora and fauna survey, the limitations of seasonal influence on the presence/absence of flora species (particularly annuals) must be considered. The short duration of the assessment limited the opportunity to observe migratory, transitory or uncommon fauna species.


The information outlined in this report relies on the accuracy of ecological database information, GIS layers and spatial imagery available at the time of the assessment. To minimise potential errors, the most current available data was obtained from relevant sources.
The DEPI bioregion and EVC mapping are subject to inherently broad environmental and ecological parameters used in the mapping process. Where the observed EVC was not reflective of what would be expected from EVC mapping and classification, it was attributed to the most appropriate EVC based on combination of its floristic, life form and ecological characteristics, and particular environmental conditions.

3Results




    1. Ecological Vegetation Classes

The Biodiversity Interactive Map modelling for the Otway Plain bioregion indicates that pre-1750 EVC mapping for the site and immediate surrounds would have predominantly comprised of Plains Grassy Woodland (EVC 55). Extant (2005) EVC mapping shows no mapped vegetation within the site (DELWP 2015a).


No remnant patches or scattered indigenous trees were recorded on the site. Scattered native vegetation (i.e. grasses, shrubs) was attributed to remnants of Plains Grassy Woodland.


    1. Vegetation Condition

The site was highly modified and comprised planted native vegetation around the boundary, interspersed with exotic vegetation in cleared areas and surrounding site infrastructure. Remnant native vegetation was limited to a scattered cover (<5%) of shrubs and grasses under planted vegetation. These areas have been mapped as Predominantly Introduced Vegetation (Figure 2).

Areas of planted native trees and shrubs (Plates 1 & 2) included Bushy Yate Eucalyptus lehmanii, Lemon Scented-gum E. citriodora, Bellarine Yellow-gum, E. leucoxylon subsp. bellarinensis, Giant Honey-myrtle Melalueca armillaris, Moonah M. lanceolata and Coastal Wattle Acacia longifolia subsp. sophorae. The understorey comprised scattered (<5% cover) indigenous shrubs and grasses such as Seaberry Saltbush Chenopodium candolleanum, Black-anther Flax-lily Dianella admixta, Wattle Mat-rush Lomandra filiformis and Bristly Wallaby-grass Rytidospermum setaceum. Exotic species included Flax-leaf Broom Genista linifolia, Myrtle-leaf Milkwort Polygala myrtifolia, Cocksfoot Dactylis glomerata and Kikuyu Pennisetum clandestinum.
The ground layer in the centre of the site was dominated by exotic grasses and herbs including Brown-top Bent Agrostis capillaris, Buffalo Grass Stenotaphrum secundatum, Parramatta grass Sporobolus africanus, Buck’s Horn Plantian Plantago coronopus and Cat’s Ear Hypochoeris radicata.

    1. Flora

Forty one flora species (comprising 7 indigenous, 26 exotic and eight planted native species) were recorded during the field assessment (Appendix 2). No listed threatened flora species were recorded within the site during the field assessment.



    1. Threatened Flora Species

The VBA (DELWP 2015b) contains records of three listed threatened flora species in the local area (within five kilometres of the site) including Coast Wirilda Acacia uncifolia, Marsh Saltbush Atriplex paludosa subsp. paludosa and Prickly Arrowgrass Triglochin mucronata (Appendix 3). The PMST (DOE 2015) identified three EPBC Act listed flora species or species habitats as likely to occur within the local area. No listed threatened flora species are considered likely to occur due to the absence of suitable of habitat.



    1. Fauna

Twenty fauna species were recorded during the field assessment, comprising 15 native and five exotic species (all birds) (Appendix 4). No listed threatened fauna species were recorded within the site during the assessment.


Areas of planted vegetation are of low to moderate value for fauna. Planted overstorey trees provides suitable perching, roosting and foraging habitat for species typically associated with modified habitats, including Willie Wagtail Rhipidura leucophrys, Welcome Swallow Petrochelidon neoxena, New Holland Honeyeater Phylidonyris novaehollandiae, Eastern Spinebill Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris and Australian Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen.

    1. Threatened Fauna Species

The VBA (DELWP 2015b) contains records of 33 listed threatened fauna species in the local area (Appendix 5). The PMST (DOE 2015) identified 26 EPBC Act listed fauna species (terrestrial) or species habitats as likely to occur within the local area. However, no listed threatened fauna species are considered likely to occur due to the absence of suitable habitat.



    1. Significant Ecological Communities

Review of the PMST (DOE 2015) identified that four nationally listed ecological communities may occur within the local area. These communities include:




  • Grassy Eucalypt Woodland of the Victorian Volcanic Plain (Critically Endangered).

  • Natural Temperate Grassland of the Victorian Volcanic Plain (Critically Endangered).

  • White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland (Critically Endangered).

No listed threatened ecological communities were identified within the site or surrounding area.


Figure 2 – Ecological Values within the Site



4Environmental Legislation and Policy Implications




    1. Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

The EPBC Act provides a process for assessment of proposed actions that may have a significant impact on a matter of NES, which includes listed threatened species and ecological communities.


The EPBC Act affects any group or individual (including companies) whose actions are assessed for environmental impacts under the EPBC Act. An action is broadly defined under the Act, and includes ‘a project, a development, an undertaking, an activity or a series of activities, or an alteration of any of these things’ (Commonwealth of Australia 2009).
An action will require approval from the Commonwealth Environment Minister if the action has, will have, or is likely to have, a significant impact on a matter of national environmental significance.
Implications for the Proposed Development
No EPBC Act listed threatened flora or fauna species were recorded within the site during the field survey, and none are considered likely to occur as no suitable habitat is present. Native vegetation within the site does not meet the criteria or threshold requirements for any EPBC Act listed ecological communities.
A referral to the Commonwealth Environment Minister is not required, as no matters of NES are likely to be impacted by the proposed development.

    1. Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988

The FFG Act is the main Victorian legislation for the conservation of threatened species and communities and for the management of potentially threatening processes.


The FFG Act contains a list of threatened flora and fauna species and vegetation communities in accordance with Section 10 of the Act. In addition, ‘Protected Flora’ are species identified for protection under the Act, and includes species from three sources:


  • Flora declared to be protected under section 46 of the FFG Act.

  • Flora (species, subspecies or varieties) listed as threatened under section 10 the FFG Act.

  • Flora belonging to communities listed as threatened under section 10 the FFG Act.

A permit is required from DSE to 'take' (kill, injure, disturb or collect) listed flora species, flora species that are members of listed communities or protected flora from public land. This includes any of the Asteraceae (Daisies), all orchids, ferns (excluding Bracken) and Acacia species (excluding Acacia dealbata, Acacia decurrens, Acacia implexa, Acacia melanoxylon and Acacia paradoxa).


Implications for the Proposed Development
No listed threatened or protected flora species were recorded during the field survey. An FFG Act permit is generally not required for removal of protected flora species on private land.

    1. Planning and Environment Act 1987

The purpose of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 is to establish a framework for planning the use, development and protection of land in Victoria. Native vegetation clearance is managed under the Act and through municipal planning schemes.


Under Clause 52.17 Native Vegetation, a permit is required to remove, destroy or lop native vegetation, including dead vegetation (on a site of more than 0.4 hectares) but this does not apply if the application is exempt under the schedule to Clause 52.17.
Planning schemes may contain other provisions in relation to the removal of native vegetation. For example several environment and land management overlays include requirements to obtain a planning permit to remove, destroy or lop any vegetation that are separate to the permit requirements in Clause 52.17.
The impact on Victoria’s biodiversity associated with removal of native vegetation requires consideration under the Guidelines, when applying for a permit under Clause 52.17. An application is classified under the low, medium or high risk-based pathway as defined in the Guidelines (DEPI 2013a). Each risk pathway has specific application requirements and decision guidelines that must be considered (DEPI 2013a).
Clause 66.02-2 requires that the following applications to remove native vegetation, triggered under Clause 52.17, be referred to DEPI for assessment:


  • Applications in the low risk-based pathway where the native vegetation to be remove is 0.5 hectares or more;

  • All applications in the moderate risk-based pathway;

  • All applications in the high risk-based pathway;

  • Applications where a property vegetation plan applies to the site; and,

  • Applications on Crown land that is occupied or managed by the responsible authority (DEPI 2013a).


Implications for the Proposed Development
Clause 52.17 – Native Vegetation
The site contains scattered native shrubs and grasses (<5% cover). A permit application is required for the removal, destruction or lopping of native vegetation under Clause 52.17 of the Greater Geelong planning scheme (DTPLI 2015). An assessment under the Guidelines is not required, as the site does not support any remnant patches or scattered indigenous trees.
A planning permit is not required to remove planted native or exotic trees on the site (if required for removal).

    1. Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994

The Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (CaLP Act) is the main legislation covering noxious weed and pest animal management in Victoria. Under this Act species of plants and animals can be declared as noxious weeds and pest animals.


Under the CaLP Act all landowners have legal obligations regarding the management of declared noxious weeds and pest animals on their land. In relation to his or her land a landowner must take all reasonable steps to:


  • Eradicate regionally prohibited weeds.

  • Prevent the growth and spread of regionally controlled weeds.

  • Prevent the spread of regionally controlled weeds and established pest animals on a roadside that adjoins the landowner's land (DPI 2010).


Implications for the Proposed Development
The site contains two regionally controlled weed species (Flax-leaf Broom and Gorse) (Appendix 2). To meet land management requirements under the CaLP Act, land managers are required to take all reasonable steps to prevent the growth and spread of regionally controlled weeds (DPI 2010).

5Conclusion

The site was highly modified and comprised planted native vegetation around the boundary, interspersed with exotic vegetation in cleared areas and surrounding site infrastructure. Remnant native vegetation was limited to a scattered cover (<5%) of shrubs and grasses under planted vegetation.


No listed threatened flora or fauna species were recorded during the field assessment, and none are considered likely to occur due to the modified condition of habitat.
No matters of National Environmental Significance (i.e. species habitats and ecological communities) are likely to be impacted by future development of the site; therefore, an EPBC Act referral is not required.
A permit application is required for the removal, destruction or lopping of native vegetation (i.e. scattered native shrubs and grasses) under Clause 52.17 of the Greater Geelong Planning Scheme. However, an assessment under the Guidelines is not required, as the site does not support any remnant patches or scattered indigenous trees. A planning permit is not required to remove planted native or exotic trees on the site (if required for removal).

6Plates



Plate 1: Planted vegetation along the southern boundary


Plate 2: Planted vegetation along the northern boundary


7References

Australian National Botanic Gardens 2012. Australian Plant Census.

http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html
Commonwealth of Australia 2009. Matters of National Environmental Significance Significant impact guidelines: Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Commonwealth of Australia.
DEPI 2013a. Permitted clearing of native vegetation: Biodiversity Assessment Guidelines. Department of Environment and Primary Industries: http://www.depi.vic.gov.au
DEPI 2013b. Permitted clearing of native vegetation - Defining and classifying native vegetation Fact sheet. Department of Environment and Primary Industries: http://www.depi.vic.gov.au
DELWP 2015a. Biodiversity Interactive Map. Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning: http://www.depi.vic.gov.au
DELWP 2015b. Victorian Biodiversity Atlas. Sourced from: VBA_FLORA25; VBA_FLORA100; VBA_FAUNA25 and VBA_FAUNA100. Department of Environment and Primary Industries: https://vba.dse.vic.gov.au
DOE 2014. Protected Matters Search Tool: Department of Environment http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/pmst/
DPI 2010. Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994. Department of Primary Industries: http://www.dpi.vic.gov.au
DTPLI 2015. Planning Schemes Online: http://planningschemes.dpcd.vic.gov.au Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure.


8

9Appendices

Appendix 1 – Likelihood of Occurrence

One or more of the following criteria was used to establish the likelihood of occurrence for threatened flora and fauna species within the subject site:


High likelihood:

  • Previously recorded in the site.

  • Likely to visit the site during seasonal movements.

  • Frequently recorded within the local area.

  • Known or likely to maintain resident populations in the local area.

  • Presence of preferred habitat within the site.

Moderate likelihood:



  • May regularly move through or visit the site as a seasonal visitor.

  • Previous records within the local area.

  • Some characteristics of a species preferred habitat is present although in a modified condition.

  • Unlikely to maintain a population within the site.

Low Likelihood:



  • Species likely to occur as a rare or opportunistic visitor.

  • Few previous records within the local area.

  • Habitat within the site is highly modified and does represent the species preferred habitat.

Unlikely:



  • No suitable habitat present on the site or in the surrounding area.

  • No species records in the local area.

  • Beyond the species natural distribution or considered locally extinct.



Appendix 2 – Flora Survey Results

Table 1: Flora species recorded during the field assessment



Scientific Name

Common Name

Acacia longifolia subsp. sophorae

Coast Wattle#

Agrostis capillaris

Brown-top Bent*

Anthoxanthum odoratum

Sweet Vernal-grass*

Arctotheca calendula

Cape weed*

Aster subulatus

Aster-weed*

Briza minor

Lesser Quaking-grass*

Bromus catharticus

Prairie Grass*

Bromus hordeaceus subsp. hordeaceus

Soft Brome*

Callistemon spp.

Bottlebrush#

Chenopodium candolleanum

Seaberry Saltbush

Cynodon dactylon var. dactylon

Couch*

Dactylis glomerata

Cocksfoot*

Dianella admixta

Black-anther Flax-lily

Ehrharta erecta var. erecta

Panic Veldt-grass*

Ehrharta longiflora

Annual Veldt-grass*

Eucalyptus lehmannii

Bushy Yate#

Eucalyptus leucoxylon subsp. bellarinensis

Bellarine Yellow-gum#

Eucalyptus citriodora

Lemon Scented Gum#

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus#

Galenia pubescens var. pubescens

Galenia*

Genista linifolia

Flax-leaf Broom**

Holcus lanatus

Yorkshire Fog*

Hypochaeris radicata

Flatweed*

Lagurus ovatus

Hare's-tail Grass*

Leptospermum laevigatum

Coast Tea-tree

Leucopogon parviflorus

Coastal Beard-heath

Lolium perenne

Perennial Rye-grass*

Lomandra filiformis

Wattle Mat-rush

Melaleuca armillaris

Giant Honey-myrtle#

Melaleuca lanceolata subsp. lanceolata

Moonah#

Paspalum dilatatum

Caterpillar Grass*

Plantago coronopus

Buck's-horn Plantain*

Plantago lanceolata

Ribwort*

Pennisetum clandestinum

Kikuyu*

Polygala myrtifolia

Myrtle-leaf Milkwort*

Rytidosperma setaceum

Bristly Wallaby-grass

Rytidosperma racemosum var. racemosum

Slender Wallaby-grass

Sporobolus africanus

Parramatta Grass*

Taraxacum officinale spp. agg.

Garden Dandelion*

Ulex europaeus

Gorse**

Vulpia bromoides

Squirrel-tail Fescue*

Notes: *Exotic species; **Listed noxious weed; #Planted species


Appendix 3 – Threatened Flora Records

Table 2. Threatened flora records



Scientific Name

Common Name

Records#

EPBC

FFG

DEPI

Likely Occurrence

Atriplex paludosa subsp. paludosa

Marsh Saltbush

3

-

-

r

U

Triglochin mucronata

Prickly Arrowgrass

1

-

-

r

U

Acacia uncifolia

Coast Wirilda

6

-

-

r

U

Notes: Threatened species records were sourced from the VBA (DELWP 2015b), within a 5 km radius of the site.


EPBC Act listed species (DOE 2014)

Cr Critically Endangered

En Endangered

V Vulnerable

Mm Migratory Marine

Mt Migratory Terrestrial




FFG Act listed species (DSE 2005; 2013)

L Listed as Threatened




DEPI listed species (DSE 2005; 2013):

cr Critically endangered

e Endangered

v Vulnerable

r Rare


Likelihood of occurrence: H = High likelihood; M = Moderate likelihood; L = Low likelihood; U = Unlikely to occur (Appendix 1).


Figure 3 – Threatened Flora Records




Appendix 4 – Fauna Species Results

Table 3. Recorded fauna species within the site



Scientific Name

Common Name

Origin

Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris

Eastern Spinebill




Alauda arvensis

European Skylark

Introduced

Anthochaera carunculata

Red Wattlebird




Colluricincla harmonica

Grey Shrike-thrush




Corvus coronoides

Australian Raven




Cracticus torquatus

Grey Butcherbird




Eolophus roseicapilla

Galah




Grallina cyanoleuca

Magpie-lark




Gymnorhina tibicen

Australian Magpie




Lichenostomus chrysops

Yellow-faced Honeyeater




Malurus cyaneus

Superb Fairy-wren




Passer domesticus

House Sparrow

Introduced

Petrochelidon neoxena

Welcome Swallow




Phylidonyris novaehollandiae

New Holland Honeyeater




Rhipidura albiscarpa

Grey Fantail




Rhipidura leucophrys

Willie Wagtail




Streptopelia chinensis

Spotted Turtle-Dove

Introduced

Sturnus vulgaris

Common Starling

Introduced

Trichoglossus haematodus

Rainbow Lorikeet




Turdus merula

Common Blackbird

Introduced



Appendix 5 – Threatened Fauna Records

Table 4. Threatened fauna records



Scientific Name

Common Name

Status in Victoria

Records

Likely Occurrence

Lewinia pectoralis pectoralis

Lewin's Rail

v

1

U

Porzana pusilla palustris

Baillon's Crake

v

1

U

Sternula albifrons sinensis

Little Tern

v

6

U

Sternula nereis nereis

Fairy Tern

e

27

U

Arenaria interpres

Ruddy Turnstone

v

31

U

Pluvialis squatarola

Grey Plover

e

10

U

Pluvialis fulva

Pacific Golden Plover

v

15

U

Charadrius mongolus

Lesser Sand Plover

ce

8

U

Charadrius leschenaultii

Greater Sand Plover

ce

1

U

Numenius madagascariensis

Eastern Curlew

v

19

U

Numenius phaeopus

Whimbrel

v

2

U

Tringa glareola

Wood Sandpiper

v

2

U

Tringa brevipes

Grey-tailed Tattler

ce

1

U

Tringa nebularia

Common Greenshank

v

42

U

Tringa stagnatilis

Marsh Sandpiper

v

2

U

Calidris ferruginea

Curlew Sandpiper

e

40

U

Calidris canutus

Red Knot

e

17

U

Calidris tenuirostris

Great Knot

e

7

U

Egretta garzetta nigripes

Little Egret

e

11

U

Ardea intermedia

Intermediate Egret

e

1

U

Ardea modesta

Eastern Great Egret

v

8

U

Anas rhynchotis

Australasian Shoveler

v

5

U

Aythya australis

Hardhead

v

5

U

Oxyura australis

Blue-billed Duck

e

2

U

Biziura lobata

Musk Duck

v

6

U

Accipiter novaehollandiae novaehollandiae

Grey Goshawk

v

1

U

Haliaeetus leucogaster

White-bellied Sea-Eagle

v

1

U

Falco subniger

Black Falcon

v

2

U

Neophema chrysogaster

Orange-bellied Parrot

ce

17

U

Neophema elegans

Elegant Parrot

v

1

U

Calamanthus pyrrhopygius

Chestnut-rumped Heathwren

v

1

U

Chthonicola sagittatus

Speckled Warbler

v

1

U

Limosa limosa

Black-tailed Godwit

v

5

U

Notes: Threatened species records were sourced from the VBA (DELWP 2015b), within a 5 km radius of the site


EPBC Act listed species (DOE 2014)

Cr Critically Endangered

En Endangered

V Vulnerable

Mm Migratory Marine

Mt Migratory Terrestrial




FFG Act listed species (DSE 2005; 2013)

L Listed as Threatened




DEPI listed species (DSE 2005; 2013):

cr Critically endangered

e Endangered

v Vulnerable



r Rare


Likelihood of occurrence: H = High likelihood; M = Moderate likelihood; L = Low likelihood; U = Unlikely to occur (Appendix 1).


Figure 4 – Threatened Fauna Records





1 An area of native vegetation is defined as continuous and unbroken native vegetation. A break in remnant patch will occur where the definition of remnant patch has not been met for a continuous width of at least 10 metres (DEPI 2013a).

2 DEPI also defines a scattered tree as ‘A canopy tree is a mature tree that is greater than three metres in height and is normally found in the upper layer of a vegetation type’ (DEPI 2013b).


Каталог: common -> public -> documents
common -> Зейналов адалет сехраб оглы паразитизм и хищничество представителей типа arthropoda в агробиоценозах основных ягодных культур
common -> Хисамов раиль рауфович потенциал и перспективы использования недревесных ресурсов леса в республике башкортостан
common -> На правах рукописи Морозова Елена Евгеньевна
common -> Title: Chrysanthemum by: Kevin Henkes
common -> A dozen Common and Conspicuous Lichens of the Georgia Piedmont
common -> Internal security fund police isf police
documents -> Geelong Botanic Gardens Pelargonium & Geranium collection
documents -> Western beach precinct
documents -> Reminiscence Guide Produced by the National Wool Museum 2013


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