Creative Commons Attribution Licenses – Page of




Дата канвертавання18.04.2016
Памер28.59 Kb.

Creative Commons Attribution Licenses – Page of

© 2010 Kenneth Leroy Busbee

Version 2 – Dated: January 30, 2010

Licensed by: Kenneth Leroy Busbee under a

Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY 3.0)



http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

This item was developed as a portion of a workshop covering open textbook adoption. This handout is part of the workshop that explains the Creative Commons Attribution Licenses and most of the content on pages 2 and 3 are the original creations of the Creative Commons (see links on page 2).

Directions:


  1. If possible show the “A Shared Culture” video from the Creative Commons web site.

  2. Pass out page 2 of this handout and discuss:

    1. Copyright laws protect a person’s ability to control and profit from their creations.

    2. Some authors want to share but with some conditions – thus a license to use.

    3. Review the 4 conditions.

  3. Pass out page 3 of this handout and discuss the 6 licenses.

  4. Pass out page 4 of this handout and have the workshop participants find all six licenses.

    1. First occurrence in sequence of items as on page 3 is: #9, #1, #38, #37, #2 and #6.

  5. Pass out page 5 and have them figure out what would be the most likely license each author would use. Each of the 6 licenses is used only once. The answers are:

    1. CC-BY-NC

    2. CC-BY-NC-ND

    3. CC-BY

    4. CC-BY-SA

    5. CC-BY-ND

    6. CC-BY-NC-SA

  6. Pass out page 6 and have them figure out which licenses would satisfy an adopter’s requirements. The answers are:

    1. CC-BY-ND and CC-BY-NC-ND

    2. CC-BY, CC-BY-SA, CC-BY-NC and CC-BY-NC-SA

    3. CC-BY and CC-BY-SA

    4. CC-BY

  7. General discussion with questions and answers.

    1. Pass out page 1 and ask them, “What can you do with these materials?”

http://creativecommons.org/

http://creativecommons.org/about/

http://creativecommons.org/videos/

http://creativecommons.org/videos/a-shared-culture Link for “A Shared Culture” video.

http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/ Link for content on pages 2 and 3 of this handout.

Authors retain the copyrights to their creations. Those rights include the profits from commercial use and distribution of their creations and the right to deny other to make modifications to their creations. However, some creators are willing to share some of their rights with others. This is done when they license others to use their creative material within a set of conditions.

The conditions are:



Attribution
by

You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request.





Share Alike
sa

You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.





Non-Commercial
nc

You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for non-commercial purposes only.





No Derivative Works
nd

You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.



By putting various conditions together; there are 6 basic licenses possible:

Attribution cc by


This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered, in terms of what others can do with your works licensed under Attribution.

Attribution Share Alike cc by-sa


This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial reasons, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use.

Attribution No Derivatives cc by-nd


This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

Attribution Non-Commercial cc by-nc


This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike cc by-nc-sa


This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. Others can download and redistribute your work just like the by-nc-nd license, but they can also translate, make remixes, and produce new stories based on your work. All new work based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also be non-commercial in nature.

Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives cc by-nc-nd

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, allowing redistribution. This license is often called the “free advertising” license because it allows others to download your works and share them with others as long as they mention you and link back to you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.



Community College Open Textbook Collaborative – CCOTC – Portion of Computer Science

  1. Cascading Style Sheets (CC-BY-SA)

  2. CGI Programming on the World Wide Web (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  3. Complete Guide to Google Wave (CC-BY-SA)

  4. A Conceptual Guide to NeoOffice 2 for Mac OS X (CC-BY-SA)

  5. Database Development Lifecycle (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  6. A Designer’s Log: Case Studies in Instructional Design (CC-BY-NC-ND)

  7. Digital Darkroom Fundamentals for Mac OS X (CC-BY-SA)

  8. Designing the User Interface (CC- BY-NC-SA)

  9. Distributed Systems (CC-BY)

  10. Electronic Commerce: The Strategic Perspective (CC-BY)

  11. Finding Information in Information Technology and Computing (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  12. Firefox Manual (CC-BY-SA)

  13. Flash Tutorials (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  14. The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  15. Information on the Web (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  16. Interpreting Information Systems in Organizations (CC-BY)

  17. Introducing ICT Systems (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  18. Introduction to Computer Science (CC-BY-SA)

  19. An introduction to Data and Information (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  20. Introduction to Databases and MySQL (CC-BY)

  21. Introduction to Digital Logic with Laboratory Exercises (CC-BY)

  22. Introduction to SCORM (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  23. LaTeX (CC-BY-SA)

  24. Learning 2.0 for Associations (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  25. Linux for IT Managers (CC-BY-SA)

  26. Network Security (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  27. Non-Programmer's Tutorial for Python 2.0 (CC-BY-SA)

  28. Operating Systems for Single-Threaded Computers (CC-BY-SA)

  29. Principles of Object-Oriented Programming  (CC-BY)

  30. Producing Open Source Software (CC-BY-SA)

  31. Programming Fundamentals – A Modular Structured Approach using C++ (CC-BY)

  32. Programming in C (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  33. Programming Languages (CC-BY)

  34. Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation (CC-NC-BY-SA)

  35. Programming Using Java (CC-BY-SA)

  36. Representing and Manipulating Data in Computers (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  37. Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (CC-BY-NC)

  38. Student Tools (CC-BY-ND)

  39. Successful Project Management (CC-BY-SA-NC)

  40. Understanding Open Source and Free Software Licensing (CC-BY-ND)

  41. Using Excel 2002 (CC-BY-NC-ND)

  42. Web Security (CC-BY)

  43. What is a Wiki? (CC-BY-SA)

  44. XML – Managing Data Exchange (CC-BY-SA)

Figure out what would be the most likely license each author would use?

Place a two letter item in a blank space. Some items will not use all four spaces.

I don’t care if other people change my stuff, just give me credit. But I don’t want others making a stinking dime off what I did for ever. Not even off of items modified by them.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

I want control. You may use it and must make others aware of my efforts; but you can’t make money on it and you can’t change it.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

I don’t care how people use stuff I create. I am willing to openly share, but I want everyone to know that I was the author/creator of the original work.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

I am letting others use my material without any restrictions. They must offer the same deal on any modifications they make available to others and give me credit for my efforts.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

I want credit as the creator and don’t want it changed. I don’t care if others try to make money off of it.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

I don’t care if other people change my stuff, just give me credit. But I don’t want others making a stinking dime off what I did for ever. Not even off of items modified by them. Plus they must let other modify their derivative efforts.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

Different adopters will desire to use materials in different ways.

Identify which licenses will satisfy each of the following adopters.

Place a two letter item in a blank space. Some items will not use all four spaces.

I don’t mind if I am restricted from commercial endeavors. I don’t want to have others pressuring me into changing another author’s works.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

I like being able to change the original author’s works to suit my needs. Other restrictions don’t bother me.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

I like being able to change the original author’s works to suit my needs. I don’t want any commercial use restrictions.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____



I want the greatest flexibility in using another author’s materials.

_____ - _____ - _____ - _____


База данных защищена авторским правом ©shkola.of.by 2016
звярнуцца да адміністрацыі

    Галоўная старонка