Avoiding Plagiarism (mla style)




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Avoiding Plagiarism (MLA Style)

Read the following passages and information about each source. Then for each of the following items determine whether the sentence uses the source appropriately. Select A. Plagiarized if the sentence is not acceptable. Select B. OK if the sentence uses and acknowledges the source appropriately. (See The Little Seagull Handbook, R-4g.)





Example

Sociologists began hunting for ongoing, real-life situations in which better data could be found. A 2000 study of dorm mates at Dartmouth College by the economist Bruce Sacerdote found that they appeared to infect each other with good and bad study habits — such that a roommate with a high grade-point average would drag upward the G.P.A. of his lower-scoring roommate, and vice versa.


From Thompson, Clive. “Are Your Friends Making You Fat?” New York Times 10 Sept. 2009, New York ed.: MM28+. Print. The passage appears on page MM28.

Thompson describes a study of college students that found roommates with good study habits and high grades drag up the G.P.A.s of lower-scoring roommates (MM28).



A. Plagiarized

B. OK


[Highlight A to indicate correct response.] This is an example of plagiarism. The sentence correctly cites the source, but it copies some words from the original without enclosing them in quotation marks.

[End example]
Original source

Radio was a new thrill for many Americans in the twenties, but it had extraordinary value for the isolated farm families of the Midwest, for whom solitude loomed as a daily problem. Radio was a source of music and fun, information and weather reports, and it was an easy way to enjoy the pleasure of other people’s company. In-person visiting was a special event that often meant putting on dress clothes and serving cakes and lemonade and gathering politely in the parlor; frequently the press of chores or bad weather made that impossible. But with a radio, women could continue their housework as they listened to a friendly voice; men working in the barn had access to weather reports and farm programs.


From Stern, Jane and Michael Stern. Two for the Road: Our Love Affair with American Food. Boston: Houghton, 2005. Print. The passage appears on page 103.
1. Jane and Michael Stern note that because many midwestern farm families were isolated, radio provided a new thrill and extraordinary value (103).

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is A.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




Original source

Radio was a new thrill for many Americans in the twenties, but it had extraordinary value for the isolated farm families of the Midwest, for whom solitude loomed as a daily problem. Radio was a source of music and fun, information and weather reports, and it was an easy way to enjoy the pleasure of other people’s company. In-person visiting was a special event that often meant putting on dress clothes and serving cakes and lemonade and gathering politely in the parlor; frequently the press of chores or bad weather made that impossible. But with a radio, women could continue their housework as they listened to a friendly voice; men working in the barn had access to weather reports and farm programs.


From Stern, Jane and Michael Stern. Two for the Road: Our Love Affair with American Food. Boston: Houghton, 2005. Print. The passage appears on page 103.
2. In the twenties, radio was a source of music and fun, information and weather reports (Stern and Stern 103).

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is A.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




Original source

Radio was a new thrill for many Americans in the twenties, but it had extraordinary value for the isolated farm families of the Midwest, for whom solitude loomed as a daily problem. Radio was a source of music and fun, information and weather reports, and it was an easy way to enjoy the pleasure of other people’s company. In-person visiting was a special event that often meant putting on dress clothes and serving cakes and lemonade and gathering politely in the parlor; frequently the press of chores or bad weather made that impossible. But with a radio, women could continue their housework as they listened to a friendly voice; men working in the barn had access to weather reports and farm programs.


From Stern, Jane and Michael Stern. Two for the Road: Our Love Affair with American Food. Boston: Houghton, 2005. Print. The passage appears on page 103.
3. According to Stern and Stern, the radio offered busy farm families companionship that was easier than traditional socializing, which could be difficult or time-consuming to organize (103).

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is B.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




Original source

Radio was a new thrill for many Americans in the twenties, but it had extraordinary value for the isolated farm families of the Midwest, for whom solitude loomed as a daily problem. Radio was a source of music and fun, information and weather reports, and it was an easy way to enjoy the pleasure of other people’s company. In-person visiting was a special event that often meant putting on dress clothes and serving cakes and lemonade and gathering politely in the parlor; frequently the press of chores or bad weather made that impossible. But with a radio, women could continue their housework as they listened to a friendly voice; men working in the barn had access to weather reports and farm programs.


From Stern, Jane and Michael Stern. Two for the Road: Our Love Affair with American Food. Boston: Houghton, 2005. Print. The passage appears on page 103.
4. Stern and Stern explain that for farmers a visit with neighbors “meant putting on dress clothes and serving cakes and lemonade and gathering politely in the parlor” (103).

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is B.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




Original source

Radio was a new thrill for many Americans in the twenties, but it had extraordinary value for the isolated farm families of the Midwest, for whom solitude loomed as a daily problem. Radio was a source of music and fun, information and weather reports, and it was an easy way to enjoy the pleasure of other people’s company. In-person visiting was a special event that often meant putting on dress clothes and serving cakes and lemonade and gathering politely in the parlor; frequently the press of chores or bad weather made that impossible. But with a radio, women could continue their housework as they listened to a friendly voice; men working in the barn had access to weather reports and farm programs.


From Stern, Jane and Michael Stern. Two for the Road: Our Love Affair with American Food. Boston: Houghton, 2005. Print. The passage appears on page 103.
5. After the invention of radio, Stern and Stern observe, farm women could do chores with pleasant programs in the background while men could toil in the barn, listening to farm and weather reports.

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is A.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




Original source

For those who can’t afford to be fussy about status or pay, there are of course plenty of jobs in America. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants crowd into the country every year to work in lawn maintenance, on construction crews, or as housecleaners, nannies, and meat packers. Even in the absence of new job creation, high turnover in the low-wage job sector guarantees a steady supply of openings to the swift and desperate. To white-collar job seekers, these are known as “survival jobs”—something to do while waiting for a “real” job to come along.


From Ehrenreich, Barbara. Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream. New York: Owl-Holt, 2005. Print. The passage appears on pages 202-03.
6. For the workers that do not feel obliged to care about salary or prestige, there are many work choices (Ehrenreich 202).

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is A.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




Original source

For those who can’t afford to be fussy about status or pay, there are of course plenty of jobs in America. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants crowd into the country every year to work in lawn maintenance, on construction crews, or as housecleaners, nannies, and meat packers. Even in the absence of new job creation, high turnover in the low-wage job sector guarantees a steady supply of openings to the swift and desperate. To white-collar job seekers, these are known as “survival jobs”—something to do while waiting for a “real” job to come along.


From Ehrenreich, Barbara. Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream. New York: Owl-Holt, 2005. Print. The passage appears on pages 202-03.
7. Ehrenreich cites a consistent pool of low-paying jobs that some white-collar workers disdain and regard as jobs of last resort (202-03).

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is B.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




8. Huge numbers of immigrant workers stream into the United States each year looking for jobs in landscaping or construction, house cleaning or childcare.

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is A.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




Original source

For those who can’t afford to be fussy about status or pay, there are of course plenty of jobs in America. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants crowd into the country every year to work in lawn maintenance, on construction crews, or as housecleaners, nannies, and meat packers. Even in the absence of new job creation, high turnover in the low-wage job sector guarantees a steady supply of openings to the swift and desperate. To white-collar job seekers, these are known as “survival jobs”—something to do while waiting for a “real” job to come along.


From Ehrenreich, Barbara. Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream. New York: Owl-Holt, 2005. Print. The passage appears on pages 202-03.
9. Ehrenreich explains that in the current economy “even in the absence of new job creation, high turnover . . . guarantees a steady supply of openings” for low-paying jobs (202-03).

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is B.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




Original source

For those who can’t afford to be fussy about status or pay, there are of course plenty of jobs in America. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants crowd into the country every year to work in lawn maintenance, on construction crews, or as housecleaners, nannies, and meat packers. Even in the absence of new job creation, high turnover in the low-wage job sector guarantees a steady supply of openings to the swift and desperate. To white-collar job seekers, these are known as “survival jobs”—something to do while waiting for a “real” job to come along.


From Ehrenreich, Barbara. Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream. New York: Owl-Holt, 2005. Print. The passage appears on pages 202-03.
10. According to Ehrenreich, these “survival jobs” are something to do while waiting for a real job to come along.

A. Plagiarized

B. OK

The correct answer is A.



In The Norton Field Guide to Writing, see 47.

In The Little Seagull Handbook, see R-4g.




[Answers/Feedback]

1. A. Correct. This sentence is an example of plagiarism. Although this sentence correctly cites the source, the sentence copies some of the wording from the original.

B. Sorry, that response is incorrect. This sentence is an example of plagiarism. Although this sentence correctly cites the source, the sentence copies wording (including “a new thrill” and “extraordinary value”) from the original.

2. A. Correct. Although the sentence correctly cites the work in parentheses, it is an example of plagiarism. The phrase radio was a source of music and fun, information and weather reports is taken directly from the original and belongs in quotation marks.

B. Sorry, that response is incorrect. Although the sentence correctly cites the work in parentheses, it is an example of plagiarism. The phrase radio was a source of music and fun, information and weather reports is taken directly from the original and belongs in quotation marks.

3. A. Sorry, that response is incorrect. This sentence paraphrases the original passage effectively. It also includes appropriate credit for the source in a signal phrase mentioning the authors and a page reference in parentheses.

B. Correct. This sentence paraphrases the original passage effectively and includes appropriate credit for the source in a signal phrase mentioning the authors and a page reference in parentheses.

4. A. Sorry, that response is incorrect. This sentence is acceptable. The source’s authors are named in the signal phrase and the page number is cited in parentheses. The sentence also encloses the writers’ exact words in quotation marks.

B. Correct. This sentence is acceptable. The source’s authors are named in the signal phrase and the page number is cited in parentheses. The sentence also encloses the writers’ exact words in quotation marks.

5. A. Correct. The sentence is plagiarized. This unacceptable paraphrase borrows the sentence structure from the original passage while only replacing a few words.

B. Sorry, that response is incorrect. The sentence is plagiarized. This unacceptable paraphrase borrows the sentence structure from the original passage while only replacing a few words.

6. A. Correct. The sentence is plagiarized. Although the sentence correctly cites the source in parentheses, it takes the original’s sentence structure while replacing a few words with synonyms.

B. Sorry, that response is incorrect. The sentence is plagiarized. Although the sentence correctly cites the source in parentheses, it takes the original’s sentence structure while replacing a few words with synonyms.

7. A. Sorry, that response is incorrect. This sentence is acceptable, paraphrasing the source without using the original’s structure or wording. It includes a signal phrase identifying the author and ends by citing the pages for the original.

B. Correct. This sentence is acceptable, paraphrasing the source without using the original’s structure or wording. It includes a signal phrase identifying the author and ends by citing the pages for the original.

8. A. Correct. This sentence is an example of plagiarism. It paraphrases the original too closely, using the sentence structure of the original and substituting synonyms for words in the original. The sentence also does not credit the source.

B. Sorry, that response is incorrect. This sentence is an example of plagiarism. It paraphrases the original too closely, using the sentence structure of the original and substituting synonyms for words in the original. The sentence also does not credit the source.

9. A. Sorry, that response is incorrect. This sentence incorporates an acceptable quotation, using ellipses to indicate an omission. The sentence names the author of the source in a signal phrase and includes the pages of the quoted passage in parentheses.

B. Correct. This sentence is acceptable; it incorporates an acceptable quotation, using ellipses to indicate an omission. The sentence names the author of the source in a signal phrase and includes the pages of the quoted passage in parentheses.

10. A. Correct. This sentence is plagiarized. The phrase survival jobs is enclosed in quotation marks, but the sentence lifts the source’s language word-for-word without enclosing it in quotation marks. The sentence cites the author in a signal phrase, but there is no page reference.



B. Sorry, that response is incorrect. This sentence is plagiarized. The phrase survival jobs is enclosed in quotation marks, but the sentence lifts the source’s language word-for-word without enclosing it in quotation marks. The sentence cites the author in a signal phrase, but there is no page reference.


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