Aerospace manufacturing industry




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Profit Outlook

        “Micro Jet” Airplanes


As new trends begin to emerge in the Aerospace Manufacturing Industry many producers are introducing smaller, cheaper planes that are going to give passengers more efficient travel. Business travelers that are dissatisfied with large airports and increased security are what drive this emerging market. There are many new services offered such as air taxi that are offered by aerospace companies. The air taxi services transports travelers from point to point all while avoiding commercial airline hubs. The following Boeing Dreamliner is a perfect example of the smaller, new trend in Aerospace Manufacturing.

The global challenges of protecting the environment along with the defense programs are only going to create an increase in demand of new technology and procedure to innovate new products and create more growth. Aerospace manufacturers that have government contracts are under a lot of pressure to decrease costs and become more efficient in production. Commercial aerospace Manufacturers are also under an immense amount of pressure to increase margins and shareholder profits, in order to do this many companies have had to merge and outsource work into developing countries. Cost reduction is not the only thing that will increase profits. New technology will enable companies to become more efficient and use fewer resources to make their product.

The airline industry is slowly on its way back up, after the huge hit from the terrorist attacks. Some project that air travel is going to increase upwards of five percent a year over the next twenty years. This increase is going to slowly open the doors for more manufacturers in the Aerospace Manufacturing market. This increase in commercial air travel along with the new air taxi, point-to-point air travel, and the need for defense the possibilities are endless in the Aerospace Manufacturing.

CONCLUSION

Airplanes have evolved from a far-fetched concept and novelty into critical aspects of everyday transportation and various military activities. We rely on airplanes for numerous uses that include recreational travel, business purposes, shipment of cargo, and military defense – to simply name a few. As new needs arise, and technologies are developed and incorporated into aerospace manufacturing to address those needs, the industry will continue to grow.


For example, the way in which commercial and military aircraft are designed, developed, and produced continues to undergo significant change in response to the need to cut costs and deliver products faster. Firms producing commercial aircraft have reduced development time drastically through computer-aided design and drafting. This has allowed firms to design and test an entire aircraft (including the individual parts) by computer and send the drawings of these parts electronically to subcontractors who use them to produce the parts. Increasingly, firms have been bringing together teams composed of customers, engineers, and production workers to pool ideas and make decisions concerning the aircraft at every phase of product development. Additionally, the military has changed its design philosophy, using commercially available, off-the-shelf technology when appropriate, rather than developing new customized components.
It is truly amazing to think that in merely 100 years, an industry has come into existence and now is – and will undoubtedly continue to be – a major force in the business world and many constant aspects of everyday life.

Works Cited


“Aerospace Statistics.” Aerospace Industries Association. December 1, 2009.

.

“Airbus.” Airbus. December 1, 2009. .

“Appendix A: Aircraft Information Fixed-Wing Aircraft.” US Department of Transportation: Federal Aviation Administration.

ATC/atcapda.html#atcapda.html.1>.

"Boeing". The Boeing Company. December 1, 2009. .

"Boeing: Long-term market -- Staying current." The Boeing Company. Web. Dec. 2009. .

“Bureau of Labor Statistics.” United States Department of Labor. December 1, 2009. .

“Fortune 500 2009.” CNNmoney.com December 1, 2009. .

“Hoover.com” Hoover’s Inc. December 1, 2009.

companies/index.xhtml?pageid=16184>.

Industry Review and Outlook. Rep. Air Transport Association, 11 Dec. 2009. Web. .

“Lockheed Martin.” Lockheed Martin Corporation. December 1, 2009. .

“Northrop Grumman.” Northrop Grumman Corporation. December 1,2009. .

“Raytheon.” Raytheon Company. December 1, 2009. .

"The Jetmakers - ENTRY INTO THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY." General Atomic Homepage. Web. Dec. 2009. .

“United Technologies.” United Technologies Corporation. December 1, 2009.



.

"Yahoo! Finance." Yahoo!. December 1, 2009. .



Appendix A. Aircraft Information Fixed-Wing Aircraft


TYPE ENGINE ABBREVIATIONS

P

piston

T

turboprop

J

jet

CLIMB AND DESCENT RATES

Climb and descent rates based on average en route climb/descent profiles at median weight between maximum gross takeoff and landing weights.



SRS

SRS means “same runway separation;” categorization criteria is specified in para 3-9-6, Same Runway Separation.



MANUFACTURERS

Listed under the primary manufacturer are other aircraft manufacturers who make versions of some of the aircraft in that group.



AIRCRAFT WEIGHT CLASSES

a. Heavy. Aircraft capable of takeoff weights of more than 255,000 pounds whether or not they are operating at this weight during a particular phase of flight.

b. Large. Aircraft of more than 41,000 pounds, maximum certificated takeoff weight, up to 255,000 pounds.

c. Small. Aircraft of 41,000 pounds or less maximum certificated takeoff weight.

LAND AND HOLD SHORT OPERATIONS (LAHSO) AIRCRAFT GROUP AND DISTANCE MINIMA

FAA Order 7110.118, Land and Hold Short Operations, includes procedures and conditions for conducting land and hold short operations at designated airports. Appendix 1 to Order 7110.118 groups certain aircraft according to available landing distance for LAHSO operations. Aircraft group information for the purposes of Order 7110.118 is incorporated in this Appendix under Performance Information.



NOTE-
* Denotes single-piloted military turbojet aircraft or aircraft to receive the same procedural handling as a single-piloted military turbojet aircraft.

*** Denotes amphibian aircraft.

+ Denotes aircraft weighing between 12,500 lbs. and 41,000 lbs. For Class B Airspace rules, these aircraft are “large, turbine-engine powered aircraft.”

TBL A-1



Land and Hold Short Operations (LAHSO)
Aircraft Group/Distance Minima


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sea Level -999

1,000-

1,999

2000-

2,999

3000-

3,999

4000-

4,999

5000-

5,999

6000-

6,999

7000-

7,000

 

 

Group 1

2500

2550

2600

2650

2700

2750

2800

2850

 

 

Group 2 & Below

3000

3050

3100

3150

3200

3250

3300

3500

 

 

Group 3 & Below

3500

3550

3600

3650

3700

3750

3800

3850

 

 

Group 4 & Below

4000

4050

4100

4150

4200

4250

4300

4350

 

 

Group 5 & Below

4500

4550

4600

4650

4700

4750

4800

4850

 

 

Group 6 & Below

5000

5100

5200

5300

5400

5500

5600

5700

 

 

Group 7 & Below

6000

6100

6200

6300

6400

6500

6600

6700

 

 

Group 8 & Below

7000

7100

7200

7300

7400

7500

7600

7700

 

 

Group 9 & Below

8000

8100

8200

8300

8400

8500

8600

8700

 

 

Group 10

Greater than 8000 feet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TBL A-1 is an air traffic control tool for identifying aircraft, by groups, that are able to land and hold short based on the available landing distance. Air traffic managers shall utilize TBL A-1 for identifying aircraft by groups that are able to land and hold short at their facility in accordance with FAA Order 7110.118, Land and Hold Short Operations.

At locations requesting to utilize LAHSO with aircraft requiring greater than 8,000 feet of available landing distance, air traffic managers shall coordinate with the appropriate Flight Standards' office and Air Traffic Operations, Terminal Safety and Operations Support to obtain a letter of authorization approving LAHSO.



AIRBUS INDUSTRIES (International)

Model

Type
Designator


Description

Performance Information

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

A-300B2/4-1/2/100/200, A-300C4-200

A30B

2J/H

3,500

3,500

III

8

A-300B4 - 600

A306

2J/H

3,500

3,500

III

7

A-310 (CC-150 Polaris)

A310

2J/H

3,500

3,500

III

7

A-318

A318

2J/L

3,500

3,500

III

 

A-319, ACJ

A319

2J/L

3,500

3,500

III

7

A-320

A320

2J/L

3,500

3,500

III

7

A-321

A321

2J/L

3,500

3,500

III

 

A-300ST Super Transporter, Beluga

A3ST

2J/H

 

 

III

 

A-330-200

A332

2J/H

3,500

3,500

III

8

A-330-300

A333

2J/H

 

 

III

8

A-340-200

A342

4J/H

3,500

3,500

III

9

A-340-300

A343

4J/H

 

 

III

9

A-340-500

A345

4J/H

 

 

III

9

A-340-600

A346

4J/H

 

 

III

9

A-380-800

A388

4J/H

 

 

III

10

BEECH AIRCRAFT COMPANY (USA)

(Also CCF, COLEMILL, DINFIA, EXCALIBUR, FUJI, HAMILTON, JETCRAFTERS, RAYTHEON, SWEARINGEN, VOLPAR)

Model

Type
Designator


Description

Performance Information

 

 

Number & Type Engines/Weight Class

Climb Rate (fpm)

Descent Rate (fpm)

SRS Cat.

LAHSO Group

1900 (C-12J)

B190

2T/S+

2,400

2,400

III

7

B300 Super King Air 350

B350

2T/S+

3,000

3,000

III

7

100 King Air (U-21F Ute)

BE10

2T/S

2,250

2,250

II

7

17 Stagger Wing (UC-43 Traveler, YC-43 Traveler)

BE17

1P/S

1,375

1,375

I

2

Twin Beech 18/Super H18

BE18

2P/S

1,400

1,000

II

4

18 (turbine)

B18T

2T/S

2,000

2,000

II

 

19 Musketeer Sport, Sport

BE19

1P/S

680

680

I

1

200, 1300 Super King Air, Commuter (C-12A to F, C-12L/R, UC-12, RC-12, Tp101, Huron)

BE20

2T/S+

2,450

2,500

III

7

23 Musketeer, Sundowner

BE23

1P/S

740

800

I

2

24 Musketeer Super, Sierra

BE24

1P/S

1,000

1,000

I

3

300 Super King Air

BE30

2T/S+

3,000

3,000

III

6

33 Debonair, Bonanza (E-24)

BE33

1P/S

1,000

1,000

I

4

35 Bonanza

BE35

1P/S

1,200

1,200

I

3

36 Bonanza (piston)

BE36

1P/S

1,100

1,100

I

2

36 Bonanza (turbine)

B36T

1/T/S

 

 

I

 

400 Beechjet, Hawker 400 (T-1 Jayhawk, T-400)

BE40

2J/S+

3,300

2,200

III

8

50 Twin Bonanza (U-8D/E/G, RU-8 Seminole)

BE50

2P/S

1,600

1,600

II

4

55 Baron (T-42 Chochise, C-55, E-20

BE55

2P/S

1,700

1,700

II

6

56 Turbo Baron

BE56

2P/S

 

 

II

 

58 Baron

BE58

2P/S

1,730

1,730

II

6

60 Duke

BE60

2P/S

1,600

1,600

II

8

65 Queen Air (U-8F Seminole)

BE65

2P/S

1,300

1,300

II

5

70 Queen Air

BE70

2P/S

 

 

II

 

76 Duchess

BE76

2P/S

1,500

1,500

II

4

77 Skipper

BE77

1P/S

750

750

I

1

80 Queen Air (Zamir)

BE80

2P/S

1,275

1,275

II

 

88 Queen Air

BE88

2P/S

 

 

II

 

95 Travel Air

BE95

2P/S

1,250

1,250

II

5

99 Airliner

BE99

2T/S

1,750

1,750

II

5

90, A90 to E90 King Air (T-44 V-C6)

BE9L

2T/S

2,000

2,000

II

5

F90 King Air

BE9T

2T/S

2,600

2,600

II

7

2000 Starship

STAR

2T/S+

2,650

2,650

III

7

Premier 1, 390

PRM1

2J/S+

3,000

3,000

III

 

T34A/B, E-17 Mentor (45)

T34P

1P/S

1,150

1,150

I

1

T-34C Turbo Mentor

T34T

1T/S

1,100

1,000

I

 

T-6A Texan II

TEX2*

1T/S

 

 

I

 

U-21A/G, EU-21, JU-21, RU-21, Ute (A90-1 to 4)

U21

2T/S

2,000

2,000

II

 

QU-22 (1074/1079)

U22

1P/S

 

 

I

 
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