Was Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck Really the Grandfather of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist? Evaluating the Documentation




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Was Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck

Really the Grandfather of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist?

Evaluating the Documentation

By Rebecca Walch

Since the 1904 publication of Theron Royal Woodward’s book Dodge Genealogy, Descendants of Tristram Dodge, it has been generally accepted that Stephen Dodge the Loyalist was the grandson of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck. However, Woodward’s conclusion was based on incomplete information. Documentation now available suggests that Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck was not the grandfather of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist.

Theron Royal Woodward’s conclusion, that Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck was the grandfather of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist, was based primarily on the theory of Richard Despard Dodge. Dodge’s theory, published in his 1896 book The Dodge Lands at Cow Neck was based on information he found in a 1776. The letter, written by Samuel Dodge Jr. of Poughkeepsie to his second cousin Thomas Dodge Jr. of Cow Neck, was in response to a boundary question.1 In the letter, Samuel Jr. mentioned Uncle Jeremiah and seeing Uncle Jeremiah’s grandson Stephen at Fort Montgomery. Richard Despard Dodge wrote, “The family traditions state that there were four Dodges settled originally at Cow Neck. This Jeremiah Dodge may have been a brother to the first Samuel, and the fourth person referred to in said traditions. His relationship to the others is probably established by the letter of Samuel Dodge Jr.”2 A transcription of Samuel’s letter is on page 25 of Richard Despard Dodge’s book and reads as follows:


New York, June 16, 1776

Loving Cousin,

I rec’d a letter from you before I left home in which you Desired me to Search my father’s Writings in relation to Some Difficulties respecting the line between the two farms --- I have Searched accordingly, and find one or two old deeds or Quit claims from your father, but they respected Some of the upper fields, but I cannot find a word about the line in Question; ‘tis unaccountable to me how the line came to be given Straight; I well remember the turn at the head of the great hollow. I suppose the land was Surveyed to Uncle Tristram, and if the Surveyor was directed to keep the fence in running the line (as doubtless he was) then it’s Strange he did not Draw the Deed Accordingly; for Sure I am the fence was never Strait Since I can remember; the mistake must have happened Either Wilfully or thro inadvertency; I advise the parties Concerned to compare the deed With the Surveyer’s field book; If Williss was the man perhaps he may give some light in the matter and tell how it happen’d --- in the meantime, if I by further Searching can find anything relating to it Shant fail to let you know it; but I don’t expect I Shall, for I guess it was a mistake in Writing the deed you Mention; and if Such it ought to be rectify’d if it can be done by the present possessers giving Quit claims to each other of all lands beyond the fence, or otherwise, as they can agree --- if my father has Sold more land than he ought to have done, and that Designedly (Which I hardly think is the case), then the damage must be made good by his heirs --- I saw and talk’d with your Son at Poughkeepsie yesterday week, he was well and hearty; if you see any of Uncle Jeremiah’s family, please to remember me to them, and tell him I saw his grandson, Stephen, at Fort Montgomery last Wednesday; he was very well and said he had lately heard from home, that they were all well; he is again in Capt. Rosekran’s Company; as for news in town, although there is a great deal of talk, and news and preparations to receive the expected fleet, yet I Suppose I cannot inform you of anything but What you will other ways hear of befor you receive this.

I rest with much respect. Your loving Cousin,

Sam’l Dodge.

Richard Despard Dodge stated, “This letter is important as referring to ‘Uncle Jeremiah’ who must therefore have been a brother of the first Samuel, and probably the owner of the farm deeded in 1730 from Monfort Estate to Jeremiah Dodge; also the father of the Tristram Dodge, mentioned on pages 44, 45 and 59 of the History and the grandfather of Stephen Dodge, who afterwards emigrated to Nova Scotia. A corroboration of this theory is found on page 45, line 17 of the History, where it is stated that Tristram was a descendant of the ‘early settlers of Cow Bay.’”3 It seems Richard Despard Dodge was aware of only one Stephen Dodge and so he concluded that the Stephen he knew of—Stephen the Loyalist—was the grandson being referred to. For that reason he concluded Tristram, the father of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist, was the son of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck.

It is important to note that Richard Despard Dodge did not identify the Uncle Tristram mentioned in Samuel Dodge Jr.’s statement, “I suppose the land was surveyed to Uncle Tristram.” Samuel Jr. did not have an “uncle” named Tristram—at least not an uncle who has been identified. Tristram II was Samuel Jr.’s great uncle and Thomas Jr.’s grandfather. Tristram III was Samuel Jr.’s first cousin once removed and Thomas Jr.’s uncle. More research needs to be done to document the “Uncle Tristram” Samuel Jr. was referring to. On page 15 of his book, Richard Despard Dodge wrote, “It appears from the records that Thomas Dodge purchased the allotment of Samuel Clowes (the Surveyor himself) in 1718, and he then sold part of it to his cousin Samuel, and part to his brother Tristram.” This Tristram was Thomas Jr.’s uncle, Tristram III.

In his 1904 book, Theron Royal Woodward accepted and supported Richard Despard Dodge’s theory that Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck was the grandfather of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist. Woodward stated, “Judge A.W. Savary of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, confirms the above parentage in his excellent History of Annapolis County, and writes me, April 29, 1902, that the line was given him by the late William E. Chute, compiler of the Chute Genealogies. Child and probably others: Tristram d. 1763 (or 1760).”4 However, William E. Chute in his 1894 book, A Genealogy and History of the Chute Family in America, only twice mentions Dodge genealogy relevant to this evaluation: on page 21, “Luther … m., 2nd, Nov. 6, 1851, Emily Dodge (Samuel, Stephen, Tristram, etc.), and d. June 27, 1861.”; and on page 116, “Freeman Chute … married Elizabeth, daughter of Adam and Anna (Karns) Dodge, descendant of Tristram Dodge of Block Island, R. I., 1660, by Rev. A. Chute, Sept.16, 1858 and settled on his father’s old farm in Bayham, Ont.” The Dodge information included by William E. Chute is minimal and his documentation is not listed. Therefore, the information Chute gave to A.W. Savary cannot be substantiated and neither A.W. Savary nor Theron Royal Woodward are dependable sources for the lineage of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist.

Information from the 1774 will of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck was not included by either Richard Despard Dodge or Theron Royal Woodward. The wording of the 1774 will does not include a son named Tristram. Jeremiah’s will was published in the book Abstract of Wills on File in the Surrogates Office, City of New York (Volume IX, Jan 7, 1777-Feb7,1783), page 121. It can be read at the website http://historical.library.cornell.edu/nys/title_A.html:
“In the year of our Lord Christ 1774, the 31 day of March. I, JEREMIAH DODGE, of Cow Neck, in Queens County, do make this my last Will. All debts to be paid by my executors. I leave to my wife Elizabeth my best bed and furniture in my house, and all her wearing apparell, and all effects she had from her brother Robert Sutton’s estate, and one-half of my movable estate upon condition that she stands to the will. I leave to my daughter, Phebe Underhill, ½ of my movable estate, on condition that Samuel Underhill first pays to my estate £5 which he oweth to me. And that £5 to be paid to my grandson, Stephen Sands, when of age. I leave the rest of my movable estate to my daughter, Mary Davenport, to be kept by my executors and paid to her as they think she wants. My farm is to be sold by my executors. My three sons, Jeremiah, William, and Robert, are to pay to their mother £3 each yearly. I leave to my son Jeremiah my wearing apparel and 1/3 of the money from the sale of my farm. And he is to pay the bonds I am bound for him. My son Jeremiah is to have 20 shillings for his heir ship. I leave to my son William 1/3 of the money from the sale of the farm, and he is to pay to the rest of his brothers £2 10s. for value he has received. I leave to my son Robert 1/3. I make my trusty friends, Thomas Dodge, Petrus Onderdonk, and Adam Mott, Jr., executors," Witnesses, Obadiah De Milt, Quaker, Joris Rapalye, William Salt Proved, May 11, 1780.

Jeremiah’s statement “My three sons, Jeremiah, William, and Robert” suggests those were his only sons. Jeremiah also states, “I leave to my son Jeremiah….1/3 of the money from the sale of the farm….I leave to my son William 1/3 of the money from the sale of the farm….I leave to my son Robert 1/3.” The implication is that just three sons existed. The only part of the will that could possibly indicate an unnamed brother is the statement that William “is to pay to the rest of his brothers £2 10s.” However, such wording most likely refers just to the two brothers mentioned. The wording of Jeremiah’s will does not support Richard Despart Dodge’s theory that the Tristram Dodge who married Sarah Hawxhurst was the son of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck.

Further support for the conclusion that Jeremiah had only the three sons named in his will—Jeremiah Jr., William and Robert—comes from a May 5, 1790 agreement relating to Jeremiah’s will. Just three beneficiaries were involved: “[Agreement relating to the estate of Jeremiah Dodge], May 5, 1790. ‘Wee the subscribers, William Dodge, Robert Dodge Sons of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck deceased, and Daniel Dodge, Grandson of the abovesaid deceased, and an executor of his Father Jeremiah Dodge, Son of the abovesaid Deceased … have received the full sum of Eight Pound 1/. Each of us it bring the last part of a legacy in full … Wee do acknowlige our selves fully satisfied contented and paid, by the hands of Petrus Onderdonck and Adam Mott two of the executors …’ ”5

Just as the 1774 will of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck challenges the theory that the Loyalist Stephen Dodge was his grandson, the 1785 nuncupative will of Jeremiah’s son, Jeremiah Jr. of Pawling Precinct, Dutchess County, New York suggests a different identity for the Stephen Dodge seen at Fort Montgomery. The two genealogists, Richard Despard Dodge and Theron Royal Woodward, did not reference this will either. Jeremiah Jr.’s will was published in the book Abstract of Wills on File in the Surrogate’s Office, City of New York (Volume XIII, Sept 3, 1784-June 12, 1786), page 136, and can also be read at the Cornell Library website:6


In the name of God, Amen. I, JEREMIAH DODGE, of Pauldings Precinct, Dutchess County, being weak in Body, do this 27th day of February, 1785, make this my last Will. I desire all my debts should be paid and then I bequeath to my oldest son, Stephen, ten shillings, and I desire that my sons, Daniel and Robert, collect all my debts and settle my other affairs; it is likewise my desire that Elizabeth have twenty shillings and the warming pan, and that after settling all my accounts that they, Daniel and Robert, divide equally what may remain between themselves and Lidia Rebekah Jonathan and David as they think most proper. Witnesses, Caleb Lamb, Joseph Lamb and Elisha Champlin, “and this my will and Testament I desire by the mouth of the above mentioned witnesses should be allowed and in as full force as although I had signed the same before I deceased.” Proved, Dutchess County, March 31, 1785, when Joseph Lamb, of Dutchess County, farmer, appeared, and on the 4th day of April, 1785, likewise appeared Caleb Lamb and Elisha Champlin, of Dutchess County, farmers, and swore that they were present with Jeremiah Dodge in his last sickness, that he did then and there make his last will by word of mouth, that it was written on the 2nd day of March, 1785, after the decease of the said Jeremiah Dodge. Administration granted to Daniel Dodge, New York City, April 18, 1785.

Based on the two wills, Frank J. Doherty, in his 1997 book The Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Volume I, suggested that Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck was not the father of the Tristram Dodge who married Sarah Hawxhurst. He also suggested the Stephen Dodge seen at Fort Montgomery was Stephen the son of Jeremiah Jr. Doherty included the 1774 will of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck on page 339, and then stated “Woodward was evidently unaware of the will recited above which lists other children, but not Tristram. He errs also in stating that Tristram died 1763. His will was written 27 Feb. 1779 and proved 15 Jan. 1785. It appears he has combined this will with that of Tristram Dodge dated 27 Oct. 1760. We conclude that Tristram was probably not a son of Jeremiah.”7 Doherty also included the will of Jeremiah Jr. and then said, “Children: (Order from will. i. Stephen … He is probably the man who served in Captain Rosekrans’ company.”8

Stephen Dodge the Loyalist lived in Charlotte Precinct before the Revolutionary War; his property there was confiscated. Charlotte Precinct, a part of the Great Nine Partners Patent, is now the town of Pleasant Valley.9 Theron Royal Woodward included the following information on page 103 of his book: “The name of Stephen Dodge mentioned in New York in the Revolution (Supplement) among those whose estates were forfeited and confiscated, appears on the original documents as follows: List of farms and house sold by the Commissioners of Sequestration in Dutchess County states that the house and small lot of Stephen Dodge of Charlotte was sold to Gilbert Worden May, 1779, and that in March, 1780, he paid eight pounds.” On page 104 Woodward went on to state, “It seems probable that two of this name served in the Revolutionary War, and which one of them suffered confiscation may not be certain, but all authorities seem to agree that Stephen Dodge, son of Tristram, emigrated Oct., 1783, with wife and five children, to Nova Scotia and settled there pursuant to conditions of treaty of peace.”

According to Frank J. Doherty, Jeremiah Dodge Jr. “was probably born ca. 1725-1735 and came to Beekman as early as 1776 when he served as a path master, which he also did in 1777 and 78.”10 Pawing Precinct, also called Paulding’s Precinct, was separated from Beekman Precinct in 1769.11 Most of Pawling’s records were destroyed in a fire.12 Little is know about the sons Jeremiah Jr. mentioned in his will: Stephen, Daniel, Robert, Jonathan and David. Regarding Jeremiah Jr., Frank J. Doherty did comment, on page 340, “we suspect that he came here because his (presumed) son Daniel married Phebe Wooden, poss. of the local Wooden family. [NYM 113]. This is pure speculation, however, and we have no proof that this is the right Daniel Dodge.” Regarding Daniel Dodge, Doherty commented on page 341, “He possibly m. Phebe Wooden with bond of 14 Jan. 1762. [NYM 113]. A Daniel Dodge was on the tax roll for Half Moon in 1786 and was between William Barton and Cornelius Wilstie. A John Dodge was on this same roll, as were Timothy and Reuben Woodin (from Pawling).

Identifying the Stephen Dodge seen at Fort Montgomery would be the most direct way to determine if Richard Despard Dodge’s theory is correct. However, no muster rolls for Captain James Rosekrans’ company at Fort Montgomery have been found. Samuel Dodge Jr. did provide a useful clue in his statement that Stephen “was again in Capt. Rosekrans Company.” In March of 1776, James Rosekrans wrote a letter to the New York Provincial Congress informing them that he was raising a new company.13 This letter clarifies that James Rosekrans’ did not have a company in 1776 prior to the company he had at Fort Montgomery. Therefore, it can be concluded that the Stephen Dodge seen at Fort Montgomery was the same Stephen Dodge who was in Captain Rosekrans’ 1775 company. The October 17, 1775 muster roll for Captain James Rosekrans’ company is available.14 That muster roll includes the name Stephen Dodge and the notation that he enlisted August 11, 1775. However, no other identifying information is given. About half of the men on the muster roll have been identified; they were all from the Pawling, Beekman, Fishkill area. Although this information is not conclusive, it does create a reasonable doubt that the Stephen Dodge on the October 17, 1775 muster roll was from Charlotte Precinct. (A transcription of the muster roll is at the end of this document.)

The birth and marriage dates of the Tristram Dodge who married Sarah Hawxhurst and the birth and marriages dates of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck also need to be considered in this evaluation. The marriage of Tristram and Sarah is recorded in the marriage registry of St. George’s Church in Hempstead “1727, January 13—Tristrim Dodge and Sarah Hogsost of Oyster bay, marryed at Hempsted”15 Tristram, the father of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist, must have been born by 1706 if he was 21 years old when he married Sarah Hawxhurst. Likewise, Tristram’s father must have been born by 1684 if he was 21-years-old when he got married. Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck died in 1780. If Jeremiah had been born by 1684, he would have been at least 96 years old when he died. Although it is possible Jeremiah lived that long, it is unlikely. It is more likely that he was born between 1690 and 1700. Frank J. Doherty estimated “that Jeremiah Dodge (William, Tristram), was probably born ca. 1700.”16 Jeremiah’s wife Elizabeth Sutton, the daughter of Robert and Hannah Sutton, is listed on the 1698 census of Hempstead with the Sutton family: “Robrd Sutton, hannah sutton, Robrd sutton, Elizabeth sutton, Joseph Sutton, Jeams sutton.”17 Since Robert Sutton did not refer to his daughter Elizabeth as Elizabeth Dodge in his November 26, 1724 will—he mentioned Mary Dodge and other daughters not named—it possible that Elizabeth did not marry until after 1724. Phebe Dodge Underhill was the first child mentioned in Jeremiah’s 1774 will which suggests Phebe was the oldest child of Jeremiah and Elizabeth Sutton Dodge. Phebe birth is estimated to be between 1725 and 1735.18 Her marriage to Samuel Underhill on January 15, 1754 is recorded in the St. George’s Church records.19 The birth and marriage dates of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck and the birth and marriage dates of the Tristram Dodge who married Sarah Hawxhurst seem too close in years for Jeremiah to have been the father of Tristram.

If Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck was not the grandfather of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist, then who was? Robert Miller, in his article Hawxhurst Family publish ed in 1901 in Volume XXXII of The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record stated that Sarah Hawxhurst “m. at St. George’s Church, Hempstead, Jan. 13, 1726, Tristam Dodge of Oyster Bay, L.I., son of Tristam and Dorcas Dodge, b. about 1697; d. 1785.” Regarding this statement, Theron Royal Woodward simply said, “This seems an error.”20 It does appear that Miller confused two Tristram Dodges. Tristram III, the son of Tristram II and Dorcas Dickens Dodge, died in 1760.21 On February 27, 1779, Tristram Dodge, the father of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist, wrote his will. He died in 1785; his will was proved January 15, 1785. The existence of the two separate wills clarifies that Tristram Dodge III and Tristram Dodge, the father of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist, were not the same man.

In conclusion, the 1774 will of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck and the 1785 will of his son Jeremiah Jr. do not support Richard Despard Dodge’s theory that Jeremiah was the grandfather of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist. Although Theron Royal Woodward accepted and supported Richard Despard Dodge’s theory in his 1904 book, Woodward was working from incomplete information. Documentation now available strongly suggests that Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck was not the grandfather of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: 

I have some follow-up info regarding my previous e-mail:

 

1.  Jim Dodge of The Dodge Family Association told me in an e-mail that in the new Tristram Dodge of Block Island genealogy, Tristram Dodge, the father of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist, will NOT be listed as the son of Jeremiah.  So the info I gave in that regard is OK.  However,



 

2.  In the new book, the Tristram who married first Mary Sutton and second Phebe Willetts Mott will be listed as the son of William and Sarah George Dodge.  The Tristram who married Sarah Hawxhurst will be listed as Tristram III, son of Tristram II and Dorcas Dickens Dodge.

 

Robert Dodge, in his 1886 book, listed Tristram III as the Tristram who married Mary Sutton & Phebe Willetts Mott.  There is a lot of confusion over these two men.  Robert B. Miller in his 1901 article, Hawxhurst Family, listed the Tristram who married Sarah Hawxhurst as Tristram III.



 

I had accepted Robert Dodge's info so I am trying to go back through my info and find some documentation that clarifies which was which.

 

It is known that Jeremiah Dodge, now accepted as the son of William and Sarah George Dodge married Elizabeth Sutton, daughter of Robert and Hannah Sutton.  The leaning is that the Tristram who married Mary Sutton, daughter of Robert and Hannah Sutton, would also be the son of William and Sarah George Dodge.


A transcription of the October 17, 1775 muster roll of Captain James Rosekrans company taken at Stillwater, New York. This transcription was provided by Stephen Gilbert, Lewis Dubois’ Company, 3rd New York Regiment, NWTA/BAR:


The italicized notations after the enlistment date refer to information I have found about the men.

  • Signers in Beekman’s Precinct means the name is listed on the Articles of Association for Beekman’s Precinct dated July 1775 (source, American Archives by Peter Force, Series 4 Volume 3, pages 600-601).

  • 1790 census – town means the name is on the 1790 Dutchess County census for in that specific town. Frederickstown is now the town of Kent in Putnam County, New York, south of Dutchess County. http://www.rootsweb.com/~nydutche/1790/1790index.htm.

  • Page number means the name is mentioned on that page in Frank J. Doherty’s book, The Settlers of The Beekman Patent, Volume I.


Muster Roll of Capain James Rosekrans Company & 4th Regiment of New York Troops Commanded by Colonel James Holmes & now in the service of the United Colonies – Still Water October 17, 1775.
Captain James Rosekrans, warrant dated 3rd August 1775.

1st Lieutenant, Thomas Lee, warrant dated 3rd August 1775, page 431

2nd Lieutenant, William B. Alger, warrant dated 3rd August 1775, page 431

Serjeants

Samuel Lewis, appointment 7th August 1775. Signers in Beekman’s Precinct, 1790 census - Pawling

Joseph Wilkie, appointment 8th August 1775

Corporals

James Lee, appointment dated 7th August 1775

John Swartwout, appointment dated 7th August 1775

Lodiwick Shead?, appointment dated 12th August 1775, sick



Drum & Fife

John Schouten, appointment 11th August 1775

Coonradt Sinkler, appointment 10th August 1775, deserted 3rd October 1775
Privates (Name followed by Enlistment Date)

1. Benjamin Baker, 11 August 1775, 1790 census - Beekman

2. Joseph Bump, 9 August 1775, page 452 )

3. Jabez Berry, 9 August 1775, 1790 census - Frederickstown

4. Jacob Briggs, 10 August 1775

5. Zephaniah Brown, 8 August 1775, page 452

6. Caleb Cornell, 7 August 1775, page 450

7. Daniel Canfield, 7 August 1775

8. Alexander Cook, 8 August 1775, 1790 census - Pawling

9. John Collins, 12 August 1775, 1790 census - Beekman

10. John Clements, 31 August 1775

11. John Dutcher, 7 August 1775

12. Stephen Dodge, 11 August 1775

13. James Dimond, 10 August 1775

14. Jeremiah Ferguson, 9 August 1775, page 658

15. Michiel Gunn, 10 August 1775

16. Patrick Gantley, 7 August 1775

17. John Herrington, 8 August 1775

18. David Horton, 9 August 1775, 1790 census - Fishkill

19. Nicholas Haines, 9 August 1775

20. Ezekiel Hubbard, 9 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct

21. Joseph Holloway, 10 August 1775, 1790 census - Pawling

22. Joseph Johnson, 10 August 1775

23. Isaac Johnson, 12 August 1775, page 454

24. David Leonard, 11 August 1775

25. Jeremiah Lovelis, 8 August 1775

26. George Lovelis, 11 August 1775

27. Anoliab Marks, 8 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct

28. Warrin Marray, 12 August 1775

29. William McDowal, 8 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct

30. Richard Mackrill, 7 August 1775

31. Henry Ostrander, 7 August 1775, page 450

32. Joseph Parker, 7 August 1775, 1790 census - Frederickstown

33. Jonathan Pendle, 8 August 1775

34. John Parks, 9 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct (Jonathan Parks)

35. George Pottles, 10 August 1775

36. Jeremiah Rainey, 7 August 1775

37. Peter Robinson, 10 August 1775, 1790 census - Frederickstown

38. Jonathan Rose, 8 August 1775

39. John Richards, 11 August 1775

40. John Sweet, 7 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct & 1790 census - Beekman

41. Peter Snyder, 7 August 1775, 1790 census - Fishkill

42. John Sweet Junior, 7 August 1775 1790 census - Beekman

43. Isaac Smith, 7 August 1775, 3 are listed on the 1790 census - Amenia, Fishkill, Frederickstown

44. William Swartwout, 11 August 1775

45. John Schouten, 3 August 1775

46. Henry Schouten, 10 August 1775

47. Frederick Schut, 10 August 1775, 1790 census - Fishkill

48. Teunis Schut, 10 August 1775

49. George Sweet, 9 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct

50. Benoni Sweet, 7 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct

51. Phillips Shea, 9 August 1775

52. Matthias Sickles, 9 August 1775

53. Philip Sisco, 9 August 1775, page 430

54. Amos Sweet, 10 August 1775, page 455, 1790 census - Beekman

55. Ezekiel Smith, 8 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct

56. James Schut, 9 August 1775

57. Joshua Tucker, 7 August 1775, 1790 census - Fishkill

58. Christopher Wait, 8 August 1775, Signers in Beekman’s Precinct, 1790 census - Beekman (Walt)

59. Henry Welch, 11 August 1775

60. William Woodruff, 11 August 1775

61. Timothy Whaley, 11 August 1775, 1790 census - Pawling (Whalley)

62. Shubel Worden, 12 August 1775

63. Harmanjus Clinks, 10 August 1775





1 Samuel Dodge Jr. (Samuel I, William Tristram I) was born in Cow Neck on March 29, 1730. Thomas Dodge Jr. (Thomas I, Tristram II, Tristram I) was born in Cow Neck on January 17, 1722.

2 Richard Despard Dodge, The Dodge Lands at Cow Neck, An Appendix to Robert Dodge’s History of Tristram Dodge and His Descendants in America, 1896, page 22.

3Richard Despard Dodge, The Dodge Lands At Cow Neck, 1896, Page 26. ‘The History’ referred to is Robert Dodge’s 1886 book Tristram Dodge and His Descendants in America.

4Theron Royal Woodward, Dodge Genealogy, Descendants of Tristram Dodge, (Chicago, Illinois, 1904), page 102. Note: Woodward’s death date for Tristram Dodge is inaccurate.

5 The Website of The Port Washington Public Library, http://www.pwpl.org/collections/special/local-history/1h-05.html, the Dodge Collection. I have a copy of the original document.

6 Note: The will of Tristram Dodge, the father of Stephen Dodge the Loyalist, can also be read in this volume on page 78. Tristram wrote his will on February 27, 1779; it was proved January 25, 1785. Jeremiah Jr. spoke his will on February 27, 1785. He died by March 2, 1785.

7 Frank J. Doherty, The Settlers of the Beekman Patent, page 339. All the information from Doherty’s books in this document came from either Volume I or Volume IV.

8 Frank J. Doherty, The Settlers of the Beekman Patent, page 341.

9 A map of this area is at http://hhr.highlands.com/1829mapputnamdutchess.htm

10 Frank J. Doherty, The Settlers of the Beekman Patent, page 340.

11 History of the Town of Pawling http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ny/county/dutchess/dutch/Hist/pawling1.htm.

12 Frank J. Doherty did find information regarding a William Dodge who received a land bounty after the Revolutionary War, “We the subscribers Members of a class in Capt. Israel Veal’s Company, James Vanderburgh’s Regiment who have procured a Man, to wit, John Anderson to serve in Colonel John Lamb’s Battalion raised under the direction of this State, during the War … We do therefore in Consideration of Five pounds to us in hand paid by William Dodge … Six Hundred Acres …this 20th day of July in the year of our Lord 1782.” Was this William the brother of Jeremiah Jr.? More research is needed to identify this William Dodge. There was another Dodge family in Pawling—the Dodge family from Massachusetts. The two Dodges listed in Pawling on the 1790 Dutchess County census were members of the Massachusetts Dodge family.

13 American Archives by Peter Force, Series 4, Volume 5: “JAMES ROSEKRANS TO NEW-YORK CONGRESS. Fishkill, March 2, 1776. Gentlemen: In compliance to my orders, in making report from time to time of my progress in inlisting men and raising a company to be employed as part of the American Continental Army, I hereby inform the honourable Congress that I last evening met my Lieutenants, Lee and Lawrence, and Ensign Balding, and find that we have inlisted sixty-five men, and I do expect, without any doubt, to be ready to have my full company mustered the week after next. And whereas I further make not the least doubt but that I shall be ready to be called upon sooner than any other Captain in the County by odds; I therefore pray that I may be considered as oldest Captain in the regiment to which I am to belong. I am, gentlemen, your very humble servant, JAMES ROSEKRANS.” Another letter in American Archives documents that Captain Roeskrans was at Fort Montgomery by late March.

14 Reel 70 of the National Archives M246 Series Revolutionary War Muster Rolls, frames 0371-0373. A transcription of the muster roll is at the end of this document.

15 http://longislandgenealogy.com/StGeorge/marriages/M1727.html

16 Frank J. Doherty, The Settlers of the Beekman Patent, page 340.

17 http://www.fortunecity.com/millennium/hiberniur/438/Census4.html

18 From Underhill Genealogy Volume II, page 110 and Volume 5, page 65 according to postings at www.rootsweb.com.

19 About the children of Jeremiah and Elizabeth Sutton Dodge: Phebe Dodge married Samuel Underhill, the son of Thomas and Phebe Davenport Underhill. Mary Dodge married John Davenport, the nephew of Phebe Davenport Underhill. Unknown Dodge married Unknown Sands. (Their son, Stephen Sands, is the reason I am so interested in the 1774 will of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck. I suspect Jeremiah’s grandson, Stephen Sands, was my gggg grandfather, the Loyalist Stephen Sands born about 1761.) Jeremiah Jr.’s will suggests his wife was named Elizabeth. William Dodge married Jamima Meed according to information from The Dodge Family Association. Robert Dodge’s first wife was Sarah Underhill, the daughter of Thomas and Phebe Davenport Underhill.

20 Theron Royal Woodward, Dodge Genealogy, Descendats of Tristram Dodge (Chicago, Illinois, 1904), page 102.

21 He was married to Mary Sutton by 1724. Mary was the daughter of Robert and Hannah Sutton. Robert Sutton refers to his daughter Mary Dodge in his November 26, 1724 will. Hannah Sutton refers to her son-in-law Tristram Dodge in her August 14, 1735 will. Mary would have been the mother of Joseph Dodge, the only child mentioned by Tristram III in his will. Mary was the sister of Elizabeth Sutton, the wife of Jeremiah Dodge of Cow Neck. Tristram III married the widow Phebe Willetts Mott on November 28, 1741. Tristram III and Phebe did not have any children. Phebe had three children from her marriage to Adam Mott. Tristram III wrote his will on October 27, 1760; it was proved on December 27, 1760.


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