The Pied Piper of Hamelin Teacher’s Book  Part I  Teacher’s Guide and Teaching Plan




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The Pied Piper of Hamelin

Teacher’s Book

Part I 


Teacher’s Guide and Teaching Plan

Description

This is a very well-know story for children in the west. In this unit, students are taken through the story. Then they analyse the plot, describe the characters, rewrite and retell the story. The language activities include an exercise on verbs and another exercise where students re-sequence lines spoken by the characters. The highlight is dramatized reading (readers’ theatre), which can also be dramatization of the story.



The Story

The Pied Piper helped the town of Hamelin get rid of rats. The Mayor had promised him a lot of money but didn’t keep his promise. The Piper decided to play a more sinister tune, and led all the children of Hamlin into the mountain, where they disappeared forever.



Learning Targets





(KDb)

To interpret and use information through a sequencing activity

(ED)

To respond to characters and events in a story though oral and written activities and dramatization

(IDa)

To establish and maintain relationships and routines in schools

(IDd)

To participate with others in planning, organizing and carrying out events


Generic Skills and Attitudes

Collaborating and problem solving – through working in groups in preparing for the readers theatre performance.



Objectives

Students are able to:



  1. Retell the story with support

  2. Describe the characters in the story and the relevant events

  3. Identify and discuss the moral of the story

  4. Rewrite the story with support

  5. Dramatize-read the story in groups



Language Focus

Grammar – Use of past tense verbs describing actions.

Text types – Short story, play


Activities and Skills Focused




  • Reading short story, analyzing the plot

  • Listening and speaking – reading aloud (a story with dialogues); dramatized reading.

  • Writing – story map completion (for understanding the story structure)

  • For extended activity, an intra-class drama competition or even an inter-class drama competition can be organized (See details in the unit).



Materials





  • Story text

  • Story map

  • Worksheet for

    • practice on verbs of movement (past tense)

    • sequencing activity

    • retelling the story

    • characterization (preparation for Readers Theatre)

    • re-writing the story

  • Suggestion for organizing an intra-class or inter-class drama competition with guidelines.



Catering for Learner Diversity

In the readers theatre activity, students can be arranged to take up different roles (performing different characters) according to their abilities and interests. More active students can also be appointed as the director, and students with artistic talent can design simple costumes for the characters.



Suggested Number of Lessons


8-10


The Pied Piper of Hamelin
Teaching Steps
PART 1:
Teacher introducing the Story


Objectives:

1) To help students follow the story line

2) To encourage students to predict events in the story





  1. For a higher ability class Teacher may print out the story without pictures in the first lesson, so as to allow students more scope for imagination, and to read to find out the answers. For a weaker class, Teacher may print out the story with the pictures, so as to help students understand the story more easily.

  2. Teacher introduces the story background: Hamlin was a lovely town…. But Hamlin had a problem. Hamlin had rats.

  3. Teacher asks students to predict what happened in the story: How did the people of Hamlin deal with the problem?

  4. Teacher introduces the Pied Piper. Ask students to predict: What did the Piper do in the story? If the pictures are provided for students, they will be able to work out the answers from the pictures. They should be encouraged to find the answers themselves through reading the story.

  5. Teacher reads the fist part of the story to provide the background and to arouse students’ interest.

  6. Students finish reading the whole story at home.



Activity 1: Story map


Objectives:

1) To help students understand the structure of the story.

2) To help students get the gist of the story as they read



.

  1. Teacher guides students to analyze the plot of the story with the help of the story map

  2. Students complete the story map by describing the characters, and giving an outline of each scene in the plot, etc.



Activity 2: Reflecting on the story


Objectives:

1) To enable students to reflect on the story.

2) To give students practice in making evaluative judgements.

3) To stimulate imagination.




  1. Teacher guides students to consider the moral of the story

  2. Teacher guides students to form judgements on different characters in the story and to imagine themselves to be the characters, e.g. Do you like the Pied Piper? What would you do if you were:

  1. the Mayor?

  2. the Pied Piper?

  3. the people of Hamelin?

  4. the children?

  5. Little Jimmy?



PART 2: LANGUAGE WORK


Objectives:

1) To help students focus on some verbs of action (past tense)

2) To help students become more familiar with the story content and the language in the story.




Activity 1:
Students fill in the blanks for a text describing the activities of the rats taken from the story. They can do so individually or in pairs.
Activity 2:
Students re-sequence the dialogues of some characters in the story. They can do so individually or in pairs.

PART 3: RETELLING


Objectives:

To enable students to recall the story and to tell the story with the help of the story frame.


Activity:


  1. Teacher helps students to retell the story with the help of the story frame.

  2. Students can be asked to do the worksheet individually or in pairs.

  3. Please refer to the story frame for answers.



PART 4: READERS THEATRE


Overall Objectives:

  1. To help students develop their pronunciation and intonation

  2. To enable students to understand the characterization and the meaning of the text better through the dramatize-reading

  3. To enable students to enjoy language art activity

  4. To provide students with opportunities to work collaboratively


Step 1: Knowing about the characters



Objective:

To help students understand what expressions to adopt when they read the lines of the characters.




  1. Teacher guides students to describe in a few sentences each of the characters in the story. This step is intended for helping students understand the characters better, and enable them to read the parts with appropriate feelings and expressions.

  2. After this step Teacher can take the students through the other steps at a pace according to the ability of the students, preparing them for the readers theatre performance.


Step 2: Preparing the script


Objectives:

1) To enhance student’s understanding of the story

2) To arouse student’s interest in dramatizing

3) To demonstrate the techniques for dramatization

4) To develop student’s pronunciation and intonation.






  1. Teacher explains the task: the class will make a play from the story, and will dramatize-read the play.

  2. Teacher demonstrates dramatize-reading some lines of some characters in the story, e.g. the people of Hamelin and the Mayor (Scene 3).

  3. Teacher instructs students to mark in their story sheet which lines are to be spoken by which characters and the narrator.

  4. An audio recording of the script done by some students is provided in this resource package. Teacher can download this for students to model on.

  5. A suggested arrangement of roles for groups of 9 students is given in the Teacher’s Book.

  6. Suggested roles for groups of 9 students:




S1

Narrator A

S2

Narrator B

S3

Butcher

People of Hamelin

S4

Farmer

S5

Baker

S6

Mayor

S7

Mayor’s Wife

People of Hamelin

S8

Piper

S9

Hans


Step 3: Demonstration & instruction


  1. Teacher guides students to dramatize-read different parts of the play.

  2. Students will practise in groups, dramatize-reading different scenes.

  3. Teacher asks students to draw symbols (e.g. an angry face or a worried face) at the margin of the text as appropriate to indicate the feelings with which the lines should be read.

  4. Students will practise in groups with Teacher’s help, and then individually in their own time, maybe making use of the audio recording provided in this package.

  5. In the performance, simple costumes can be used, e.g. a big hat for the Mayor, a colourful hat for the Pied Piper. This will make the performance more entertaining, and will provide more opportunities for students to apply their talents.

  6. In addition to playing the characters, each group may organize their responsibilities as follows:

  • Director

  • Characters

  • Costume Designer (simple costumes)

  • Scenery /Property Designer (simple scenery/properties), etc.

  1. Students should be allowed a few days (or maybe over a week) to prepare and rehearse before the performance. Teacher can allow them to do so during the lesson, so that they can get help when necessary.


Step 4: Performance


  1. Groups dramatize-read their scenes in turn before the class.

  2. The final performance can be done in the school hall, although it is just a class activity. This will give more significance to the performance.

  3. The performance can be video recorded, so that students can watch their performance again. This will help them evaluate their performance and note what to improve.



PART 5: RE-WRITING


Objective:

1) To help students develop creativity and imagination.

2) To give students practice in writing.






  1. Teacher can guide students to write from a different point of view by asking them to make one or two sentences about each scene of the story.

  2. Higher ability students can be asked to re-write the story with a different ending, or a different setting, or a different problem.



PART 6: EXTENDED ACTIVITY

INTRA-CLASS READERS THEATRE COMPETITION


  1. A very good follow-up activity is an intra-class readers theatre (or drama) competition, or even an inter-class drama competition.

  2. Teachers can refer to a book on extra-curricular activities: Fun After Hours – Extra-curricular Activities for Secondary Schools (Lee, Lee & Ng, 1997). There is a chapter on how to organize a drama competition, with useful and practical procedures and materials, including a score-sheet for adjudicators. This book is available at the HKIEd Bookstore at around $64 for HKIEd students and $80 for non-students.

  3. Teachers can encourage students to work on their own in groups. According to their ability, students can be asked to do the following:

  • They can look up other stories in the library (or Internet). This can be part of their extensive reading activity.

  • Higher ability students can be asked to adapt stories into drama. This can be a challenging creative writing task.

  • Then students can dramatize-read the story or prepare to perform a drama.

  • As part of the drama activity students can be asked to write a synopsis for the story. This is a useful writing activity.

  • Students can be asked to design a poster for the story. This is a good task for extending students’ artistic ability.


Suggested number of lessons:
The amount of time varies according to the ability of the students, and how much work the teacher assigns for students to complete outside the lessons. Generally speaking Part 1 to Part 5 may take 8 to 10 lessons.

Part II 


Student Book with Answer Key


Key








The Situation: Cue questions: When and where did the story took place?

The story took place a long time ago in a town called Hamelin in the West of Germany.




The Problem:
















Rats, as big as dogs, with pointed teeth and sharp claws were everywhere in Hamelin. In the daytime, they 1. ran across the streets, 2. scrambled over the roofs and 3. played in the gutters; at night, they 4. slept in the kitchens or under people’s beds. Some of them even 5. made nests in men’s hats, 6. hid under women’s skirts, and 7. jumped in and out of children’s school bags and 8. bit the children. Some 9. climbed down chimneys to keep warm near the fireplace. They 10. made holes in the cupboards and 11. ate all the food inside. They 12. ate the bread in the bakery, the meat in the butcher’s shop and the vegetables in the farm.




Key

The rats were a problem for Hamelin. Can you remember what they did? Fill in the blanks with suitable verbs. Remember to use past tense.


Key

Who said these: Do you remember who said these lines? When did they say these? Can you put them in the right order?



Lines

Sequence

Speakers

  1. A thousand gold coins? What a silly idea!



7 – Scene 5

The Mayor

  1. But we have used many methods, and none of them has worked.




2 – Scene 1

People of Hamelin

  1. Please wait for me. Please let me go with you.




9 – Scene 6

Little Jimmy

  1. I can get rid of your rats.



4 – Scene 3

The Pied Piper

  1. Look. The rats have bitten our son’s fingers. See where his fingers are bleeding.

3 – Scene 2

The Mayor’s wife

  1. Get out of town before we beat you.



8 – Scene 5

People of Hamelin

  1. Are you going to bring in some cats?



5 – Scene 3

People of Hamelin

  1. I felt so happy when I heard the sound of the pipe.




10 – Scene 6

Little Jimmy

  1. They make our homes dirty and make us sick.




1 – Scene 6

People of Hamelin

  1. Okay, young man. I will give you a thousand gold coins if you can make the rats disappear.

6 – Scene 3

The Mayor




Focus: retelling story
Retell the story with the help of the story frame.



The situation

The story happened in…


The characters

The people of Hamelin, …


Scene 1

(The problem)

At the beginning of the story, there were a lot of rats…

Scene 2

The people were… They asked the Mayor to…


Scene 3

The Pied Piper came to the Mayor…


Scene 4

The Pied Piper blew his pipe…


Scene 5

The Pied Piper asked the Mayor to pay…


Scene 6

(The ending)

The Pied Piper blew his pipe again…

The moral of the story is…




Teacher Note: Please refer to the story frame for answers.


Key



Describe in a few sentences each of the characters in the story.






The rats



They were as big as dogs and had pointed teeth and sharp claws. They were everywhere. They bit the children and ate the food of the people…


The people of Hamelin (at the beginning of the story)



They hated the rats. They were angry. They were unhappy. They wanted the Mayor to do something.



The Mayor



His son was bitten by a rat. He was very angry. He promised to give a thousand gold coins to the Pied Piper to get rid of the rats. But after the rats were gone the Mayor did not keep his promise. He was dishonest.



The Pied Piper



He wore brightly coloured clothes in red, green and yellow. He spoke calmly. He played a tune on his pipe and led the rats to the river, where they were drowned. When the Mayor did not give him the thousand gold coins as promised, he was very angry. He blew his pipe again and led the children to the mountains.


The children of Hamelin



They heard the tune played by the Pied Piper on his pipe. They were very happy and followed him to the mountain, singing and dancing all the way.



Hans



When he heard the tune played by the Pied Piper on his pipe, he was very happy. He wanted to follow the Pied Piper and the other children. But he had a bad leg and could not follow them. He was left alone and was very unhappy.


The people of Hamelin (at the end of the story)



The rats were all gone, but their children were also gone. They were very unhappy in the end.







Teacher’s Note:

  • Teacher explains the task: the class will make a play from the story, and will dramatize-read the play.

  • Teacher demonstrates by reading some lines of some characters in the story, e.g. the people of Hamelin and the Mayor (Scene 3).

  • Teacher instructs students to mark in their story sheet which lines are to be spoken by which characters and the narrator. A suggested arrangement for groups of 9 students is given in the Teacher’s Book.

  • Suggested roles for groups of 9 students:




S1

Narrator A

S2

Narrator B

S3

Butcher

People of Hamelin

S4

Farmer

S5

Baker

S6

Mayor

S7

Mayor’s Wife

People of Hamelin

S8

Piper

S9

Hans



Teacher’s note:

  • Teacher guides students to dramatize-read different parts of the play.

  • Students practise in groups, dramatize-reading different scenes.

  • Teacher asks students to draw a symbol (e.g. an angry face or a worried face) at the margin of the of the text wherever appropriate to indicate the feeling with which the lines should be read.

  • Students will practise in groups with Teacher’s help, and then individually at their own time.

  • Each group may organize their responsibilities:

  • Director

  • Characters

  • Costume Designer




Teacher’s Note:

Groups dramatize-read their scenes in turn before the class. Simple costumes can be used, e.g. a big hat for the Mayor, a colourful hat for the Pied Piper.





Focus: Rewriting story from different points of view
Now rewrite the story as the Mayor or Hans.
Teacher’s Note:

  • Teacher can guide students to write by asking them to make one or two sentences about each scene of the story.

  • Focuses: Rewriting story from different points of view



  1. As the Mayor of Hamelin







I’m the Mayor of Hamelin.

(Scene 1)



(Scene 2)



Etc.


























  1. As Hans, the boy with the bad leg




I am Hans. I live in Hamelin.

(Scene 1)



(Scene 2)



Etc.


























A very good follow-up activity is an intra-class readers theatre (or drama) competition, or even an inter-class drama ccompetition. Teachers can encourage students to work on their own in groups. Students could choose to:



  • Look up other stories with a moral in the library (or Internet).

  • Dramatize-read the story.

  • Write a synopsis for the story.

  • Design a poster for the story.

Teachers can refer to a book on extra-curricular activities: Fun After Hours – Extra-curricular Activities for Secondary Schools (Lee, Lee & Ng, 1997). There is a chapter on how to organize a drama competition, with useful and practical procedures and materials, including a score-sheet for adjudicators. This book is available at the HKIEd Bookstore.






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