Margaret g. Meloy




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July 25, 2005
MARGARET G. MELOY
Smeal College of Business 104 Sherwood Drive

The Pennsylvania State University Boalsburg, PA 16827

444 Business Bldg (814) 466-2108

University Park, PA 16802 mmeloy@psu.edu

(814) 863-0687

(814) 865-3015 (fax)


ACADEMIC POSITIONS:
8/02 - Assistant Professor, Smeal College of Business, Department of Marketing

present The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Courses Taught: Consumer Behavior (n=40 per); Doctoral Seminar in Consumer Behavior (n=12)
8/02 – Adjunct Professor, Department of Applied Economics and Management,

present Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

7/99 – 8/02 Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Economics and Management,

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

Courses Taught: Introduction to Marketing (n=500 per), Consumer Behavior (n=50 per)

Managerial Decision Making for Food Executives Program (n=70 per)


8/96 – 6/99 Assistant Professor, R.B. Pamplin College of Business, Department of Marketing,

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg VA.

Courses Taught: Marketing Communications (n=35 per)
EDUCATION:
8/90 - Cornell University, Johnson Graduate School of Management

8/96 Ph.D. in Management (1996), M.S. in Management (1995)

Concentration: Marketing, Consumer Behavior, Decision Making (J.E. Russo, chair)

Minors: Psychology (T.D. Gilovich), Statistics (P.F. Velleman)

Dissertation: The Role of Positive Affect in the Predecisional Distortion of Product Information.
8/85 - Cornell University, Department of Agricultural Economics

1/88 M.S. in Agricultural Economics (1988)

Concentration: Food Marketing (E.W. McLaughlin, chair))

Minor: Consumer Economics (C.S. Kramer)

Thesis: A Segmentation Analysis of Consumer Attitudes and Usage of Grocery Coupons.
12/80 - The Pennsylvania State University,

12/84 Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology

B.S. in Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology (1984)

Concentration: Food Marketing

Minor: Economics
Page 2 Meg Meloy 7/05
GRANTS AWARDED:
Smeal Small Research Grant Awards (October 2003, July 2004, October 2004). Amounts awarded $1800, $650 and $2000 respectively.
“Causes and Remediation of the Predecisional Distortion of Information.” (August 2001) Awarded by the National Science Foundation, Decision Risk and Management Science to Co-Principal Investigators: Margaret G. Meloy and J. Edward Russo. Amount awarded $395,000.
“Mood-driven Influences on Consumer and Managerial Choice: Applications to the Food Sector.” (January 2000) Grant NYC-121424 awarded by the United States Department of Agriculture to Margaret G. Meloy. Amount awarded $45,000.

PUBLICATIONS:
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo and Elizabeth G. Miller (2005), “Monetary Incentives and Mood,” conditionally accepted, Journal of Marketing Research.
Carlson, Kurt A., Margaret G. Meloy, and J. Edward Russo (2005) “Leader-Driven Primacy: Using Attribute Order to Impact Choice,” forthcoming, Journal of Consumer Research.
Meloy, Margaret G, and J. Edward Russo (2004) “Binary Choice Under Instructions to Select versus Reject,” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 93, 114-128.
Meloy, Margaret G. (2000) “Mood-Driven Distortion of Product Information,” Journal of Consumer Research, 27, 345-359.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy, and T. Jeffrey Wilks (2000) “Predecisional Distortion of Information by Auditors and Salespersons,” Management Science, 46, 13-27.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy, and Victoria Husted-Medvec (1998) The Distortion of Product Information During Brand Choice, Journal of Marketing Research, 25, 438-452.
Russo, J. Edward, Victoria Husted-Medvec, and Margaret G. Meloy (1996) The Distortion of Information During Decisions, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 66,1, 102-110.
Meloy, Margaret G., Edward W. McLaughlin, and Carol S. Kramer (1988) A Consumer Segmentation Analysis of Grocery Coupon Users: Public Policy Implications, Proceedings of The American Council on Consumer Interests, Chicago, April 1988.
Meloy, Margaret G., Edward W. McLaughlin, and Carol S. Kramer (1988) A Consumer Segmentation Analysis of Grocery Coupon Users, Cornell Agricultural Economics Research Report 88-17, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. (Translated into French, 1991).

WORKING PAPERS and ARTICLES UNDER REVIEW:
Bond, Samuel, Kurt A. Carlson, Margaret G. Meloy, J. Edward Russo and Robin Tanner, “Precommitment Bias in the Evaluation of a Single Option: The Importance of Evaluative Disposition” under review at Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, June 2005.

Page 3 Meg Meloy 7/05


WORKING PAPERS and ARTICLES UNDER REVIEW (continued):
Hess, Ronald L., Margaret G. Meloy and William T. Ross, “Who is to Blame? The Effects of Store Image and Product Branding on the Assignment of Responsibility for Failures Involving Multiple Firms,” under review at Journal of Marketing, July 2005.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo and Irwin P. Levin, “The Influence of Regulatory Orientation in Select-Reject Decisions: The Role of Compatibility,” working paper, targeted for Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.
Russo, J. Edward and Margaret G. Meloy, “Aids to Rule Discovery in Wason's 2-4-6 Task,” revise and resubmit, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition.
Russo, J, Edward, Kurt A. Carlson, and Margaret G. Meloy, “Choosing an Inferior Option,” working paper, targeted for Psychological Science.

IN PREPARATION:
Atalay, Selin A. and Margaret G. Meloy (in progress), “When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Go Shopping: An Examination of Self-Gifting Behavior.” Examines the role of individual differences in unplanned purchase and self-gifting behavior. In a scenario-based study and a field study, we find that mood has a significant impact on buying self-treats for therapeutic and celebratory motivates. The meanings behind the self-gifts vary across these motives. Intended for Journal of Consumer Research.
Carlson, Kurt A. and Margaret G. Meloy (in progress), “Preference Stability: Generation Ease of 2 vs 10 Reasons in Preferential Choice.” Studies 1 and 2 complete. The typical finding in the decision making area is that 10 reasons are more difficult to generate for a current preference and lead to higher levels of preference reversals after the reason generation task. We find the opposite. Specifically, when the reason generation task is unconstrained (the reasons can be based on concrete facts as well as preferential inferences), generating 10 reasons leads to preference being more (rather than less) stable. The standard result holds only when individuals are bounded by instructions to think about concrete reasons for their preference. Study 3 is planned. Intended for Journal of Consumer Research.

Carlson, Kurt A. and Margaret G. Meloy (in progress) “Mood and the Planning Fallacy.” The research explores whether people who are in different affective states (happy, neutral sad) engage in different degrees of the planning fallacy. The planning fallacy involves the underestimation of the time to complete a task. Data were gathered with students estimating time to complete a homework assignment as well as a final course project. Individuals who were happy underestimated the time to completion, while those who were in a negative state were more realistic. A second study confirmed these findings with estimates of the number of moves to solve a Tower of Hanoi problem. A third study is planned and will use performance on cross-word puzzles. Intended for Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.


Carlson, Kurt A., Margaret G. Meloy, and Donald Lichtenstein (in progress), “Leadership in Preferential Choice: Its Role in the Interpretation of Price Discounts.” This work extends what we know about preference formation processes and examines the role of a tentative preference in the interpretation of promotional activities. In a binary choice study, the interpretation of a price discount was favorable when that option was tentatively preferred, but interpreted negatively when the discounted option was trailing (e.g., “they must have to discount to get anyone to buy it”). Study 2 found that there were no differences when price was related as an absolute price difference or a price discount. Study 3 manipulated the magnitude of the price discount and while a “lower quality” inference was made about the trailing option for the small discount, no such inference was made for the large discount. People simply switched leaders. Intended for Journal of Consumer Research.

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IN PREPARATION (continued):
Klein-Pearo, Lisa R. and Margaret G. Meloy (in progress) “The Links Between Affect and User Control.” Two studies examine the interaction between mood and user control in a computer-mediated environment. In both studies, those who received control were happier than those who received no control. Further, those in a manipulated negative affective state who received control were twice as likely to engage in biased processing (i.e., predecisional distortion) relative to their neutral affect counterparts. This particular bias is known to be exacerbated by a good mood. As such, it appears that for those in a bad mood, using control could be beneficial as a mood management (i.e., improvement) tool. Intended for Journal of Consumer Research.
Meloy, Margaret G., Kurt A. Carlson, and J.Edward Russo (in progress) “The Impact of Predecisional Distortion on Information Processing and Choice.” This monorgraph summarizes 20+ published and unpublished studies on predecisional distortion as a comprehensive review of what has been done and what we know. Intended for Journal of Consumer Research Monographs.
Meloy, Margaret G., Rajdeep U. Grewal, and Melea D. Press (in progress) “The Impact of Regulatory Focus and Alignability on Consideration Set Formation.” Three studies examine the impact of feature alignability and regulatory orientation on consideration set formation and mood. When features are aligned, the sizes of the consideration sets are no different than non-aligned. However, mood tends to be higher after forming consideration sets from aligned options. Individuals with a prevention (rather than promotion) orientation form consideration sets that are larger when the features are aligned and they are significantly happier about those consideration sets. Given the complex interactions between alignability, regulatory orientation, and mood, we are collecting additional verbal protocol data to shed light on the mechanisms. Intended for Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.
Meloy, Margaret G., William D. Schulze, David R. Just, Daniel L. Shawhan, and Evan A. Grove (in progress) “Regulatory Orientation and The Endowment Effect.” Three studies show that regulatory orientation has the ability to shift the market demand for products based on the fit between the product’s appeal for promotion or prevention goals and the priming of these orientations. The dependent measures are both willingness to pay and willingness to accept in a Vickery Auction setting. Intended for Management Science.
Meloy, Margaret G. and Baba Shiv (in progress) “Dashed Hopes”. Two studies examine the impact of non-traditional phantom options on whether individuals embrace or discard the status quo option. Specifically, if individuals are presented with the possibility of attaining a better position (relative to current), but that possibility is then withdrawn, are they more or less satisfied with the status quo? Two studies suggest that we become less satisfied with the status quo option and opt to move on. Intended for Journal of Consumer Research.
Russo, J. Edward, Kurt A. Carlson, and Margaret G. Meloy (in progress) “Drivers of Predecisional Distortion in Choice.” The research examines two potential drivers of predecisional distortion. The two candidates, namely consistency in preference and separation of two alternatives, are examined. The results of three studies suggest that separation and consistency are both important. A fourth study, using verbal protocols and Carlson’s goal assessment technique, reveals that it is consistency that drives distortion of information in choice processes. Intended for Journal of Consumer Research.
Page 5 Meg Meloy 7/05

CONFERENCE AND WORKSHOP PRESENTATIONS:
Atalay, A. Selin and Margaret G. Meloy, “When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Go Shopping: An Examination of Self-Gifting Behavior,” Working Paper Session. 32nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, San Antonio, TX, September 2005.
Bond, Samuel, Kurt A. Carlson, Margaret G. Meloy, J. Edward Russo and Robin Tanner, “Precommitment Bias in the Evaluation of a Single Option: The Importance of Evaluative Disposition,” Competitive Paper Session, 32nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, San Antonio, TX, September 2005.
Russo, J. Edward, Kurt A. Carlson, Margaret G. Meloy, Elizabeth G. Miller, and Kevyn Young, “Evaluating Information During a Decision,” Marketing Workshop, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, May 2005.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo and Elizabeth G. Miller, “Incentives: Use with Caution,” BCRST Marketing Conference, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, May 2005.
Bond, Samuel, Kurt A. Carlson, Margaret G. Meloy, J. Edward Russo and Robin Tanner, “Precommitment Bias in the Evaluation of a Single Option: The Importance of Evaluative Disposition,” Haring Symposium, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, April 2005.
Meloy, Margaret G., “Affect and Decision Making,” Competitive Paper Session Chair, Annual Meeting of the Society for Consumer Psychology, St. Pete Beach, FL, February 2005.
Carlson, Kurt A., Margaret G. Meloy, and J.Edward Russo, “Manipulating Preference through Attribute Order,” 25th Annual Meeting of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, Minneapolis, MN, November 2004.
Meloy, Margaret G. “Predecisional Distortion,” Department of Psychology Workshop, Penn State, University Park, PA, October 2004.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo and Elizabeth G. Miller “Incentives: Use with Caution,” Marketing Workshop, Fox School of Business and Management, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, March 2004.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo, and Irwin P. Levin “Selecting versus Rejecting in Choice: Quest for Compatibility,” Annual Meeting of the Society for Consumer Psychology, San Francisco, CA, February 2004.
Meloy, Margaret G. and J. Edward Russo “Conflict and Framing: Selecting versus Rejecting in Binary Choice,” 31st Annual Meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, Toronto, Canada, October 2003.
Russo, J. Edward, Kurt A. Carlson and Margaret G. Meloy “Evaluating Information,” Northeast Marketing Consortium, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, September 2003.
Meloy, Margaret G. and J. Edward Russo “Selecting and Rejecting in Binary Choice,” Marketing Workshop, Eller College of Business and Public Administration, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, February 2003.
Russo, J. Edward, Kurt A. Carlson and Margaret G. Meloy “Was Bayes Conscious?” 42nd Annual Bayesian Research Conference, Los Angeles CA, February 2003.
Meloy, Margaret G. and J. Edward Russo “A Growing Commitment to a Developing Preference,” 8th Behavioral Decision Research in Management, Chicago, June 2002.
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CONFERENCE and WORKSHOP PRESENTATIONS (continued):
Meloy, Margaret G., “Pricing Issues,” Competitive Paper Session Chair, Annual Meeting of the Society for Consumer Psychology, Austin, TX, February 2002.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo and Elizabeth Gelfand Miller, “Monetary Incentives and Mood,” Marketing Workshop, Pamplin College of Business, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, November, 2001.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo and Elizabeth Gelfand Miller, “Monetary Incentives and Mood,” Marketing Workshop, Smeal College of Business, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, November, 2001.
Meloy, Margaret G., “Positioning and Evaluating New Products,” Competitive Paper Session Chair, 32nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, Austin, TX, October 2001.
Meloy, Margaret G. and J. Edward Russo “The Impact of Choice Versus Rejection on the Predecisional Distortion of Information,” Marketing Workshop, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, Durham, NC, April 2001
Meloy, Margaret G. “Consumer and Managerial Decision Making,” Food Science Workshop, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, March 2001.
Russo, J. Edward, Kurt A. Carlson and Margaret G. Meloy “Order Effects and Predecisional Distortion in Choice,” 29th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, New Orleans, LA, November 2000.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo and Elizabeth G. Gelfand “The Perverse Impact of Incentives on the Predecisional Distortion of Information,” 7th Behavioral Decision Research in Management, Tucson, AZ, May 2000.
Russo, J. Edward, Kurt A. Carlson and Margaret G. Meloy “Using Order and Distortion of Information to Influence Choice,” 7th Behavioral Decision Research in Management, Tucson, AZ, May 2000.
Russo, J. Edward and Margaret G. Meloy “The Distortion of Information to Achieve Consistency,” 7th Behavioral Decision Research in Management, Tucson, AZ, May 2000.
Meloy, Margaret G. and J. Edward Russo “Distortion of Information in Choice and Judgment,” Micro-OB Research Exchange, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, April 2000.
Carlson, Kurt A., Margaret G. Meloy, and J. Edward Russo “The Impact of a Warning on Predecisional Distortion,” Annual Meeting of the Society for Consumer Psychology, San Antonio, TX, February 2000.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo, and Elizabeth G. Gelfand “The Impact of Incentives for Accuracy on Predecisional Distortion,” Annual Meeting of the Society for Consumer Psychology, San Antonio, TX, February 2000.
Meloy, Margaret G. and J. Edward Russo “Selecting and Rejecting: Predecisional Distortion and Evaluative Focus,” Annual Meeting of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, Los Angeles, CA, November 1999.
Meloy, Margaret G., J. Edward Russo and Elizabeth G. Gelfand “Incentives: Do they Always Work?” Behavioral Economics and Decision Research Center, Cornell University, Ithaca NY, September 1999.
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CONFERENCE and WORKSHOP PRESENTATIONS (continued):
Meloy, Margaret G. and J. Edward Russo “Information Distortion: The Role of Attribute Complexity and Form,” Applied Economics and Management Workshop, Cornell University, Ithaca NY, December 1998.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy, and Victoria Husted-Medvec “Pre-decisional Distortion of Product Information,” Association for the Advancement of Educational Research Conference, Ponte Vedre FL, December 1998.
Shoemaker, Stowe. and Margaret G. Meloy “The Impact of Digital Cash: A Cross-Cultural Study,” 7th Frontiers in Services Conference, Nashville TN, October 1998.
Meloy, Margaret G. “Affect-Driven Distortion,” 6th Behavioral Decision Research in Management Conference, Miami FL, June 1998.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy, and Victoria-Husted Medvec “The Distortion of Information in Choice,” 6th Behavioral Decision Research in Management Conference, Miami FL, June 1998.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy, and T. Jeffrey Wilks “Accountability and Predecisional Distortion in Professional Settings,” 6th Behavioral Decision Research in Management Conference, Miami FL, June 1998.
Russo, J. Edward and Margaret G. Meloy “Hypothesis Generation and Testing in Wason’s 2-4-6 Rule Discovery Task,” 36th Annual Bayesian Research Conference, San Diego CA, February 1998.
Meloy, Margaret G. “Positive Affect, Predecisional Distortion, and Disconfirmation,” 25th Annual Meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, Denver CO, October 1997.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy and Victoria Husted-Medvec “The Role of Predecisional Distortion in Consumer Choice,” 8th Annual Meeting of the Buffalo, Cornell, Rochester, Syracuse, Toronto Research Group, Rochester NY, May 1997.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy, and Victoria-Husted Medvec “The Role of Predecisional Distortion in Choice,” 35th Annual Bayesian Research Conference, Los Angeles CA, February 1997.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy, and Victoria Husted-Medvec “The Role of Predecisional Distortion in Product Choice,” 25th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Chicago IL, November 1996.
Russo, J. Edward, Margaret G. Meloy, and Victoria Husted-Medvec “The Role of Predecisional Distortion in Brand Choice,” 24th Annual Meeting of the Association for Consumer Research, Tucson AZ, October 1996.
Russo, J. Edward and Margaret G. Meloy “Wason’s 2-4-6: Hypothesis Generation and Rule Discovery,” Marketing Workshop, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University, March 1995.
Russo, J. Edward and Margaret G. Meloy “Aids to Rule Discovery,” 5th Behavioral Decision Research in Management Conference, Boston MA, May 1994.
Meloy, Margaret G., Edward W. McLaughlin, and Carol S. Kramer “A Consumer Segmentation Analysis of Grocery Coupon Users: Public Policy Implications,” American Council on Consumer Interests, Chicago IL, April 1988.
Page 8 Meg Meloy 7/05
CONFERENCE SPECIAL SESSION CHAIR:



  • Behavioral Decision Research in Management, Chicago (June 2002)

  • Society for Consumer Psychology, Austin (February 2002)

  • Association for Consumer Research, Austin (October 2001)

  • Society for Consumer Psychology, San Antonio (February 2001)

  • Behavioral Decision Research in Management, Tucson (May 2000)

  • Society for Judgment and Decision Making, Los Angeles (November 1999)

  • Behavioral Decision Research in Management, Miami (June 1998)


OTHER PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:
1/95 - 6/96 Instructor, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University

Taught Marketing Management for non-MBAs.


8/93-8/94 Instructor, Department of Economics, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg PA

Taught courses in Introductory Statistics, Intermediate Statistics, Introductory Microeconomics, and coordinated all Statistics labs.


1/92 - 6/93 Teaching Assistant to Alice M. Isen, Johnson Graduate School of Management,

Cornell University. Assisted with “Consumer Behavior” and “Affect and Brand Equity” courses.


1/89 – 8/90 Marketing Research Analyst, The Franklin Mint, Franklin Center, PA.

Screened new product ideas and forecast revenue generation through the use of econometric models, developed questionnaires, analyzed customer satisfaction and purchase motivations, prepared reports, and presented results to upper management.


9/88 - 1/89 Adjunct Faculty, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA.

Filled in when a faculty member passed away mid-semester. Taught Introductory Statistics.


1/88 – 7/88 Extension Associate, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Developed fruit and vegetable crop budgets for a special interdisciplinary Task Force formed to examine growth opportunities in Pennsylvania agriculture. Developed materials for the Handbook of Agriculture for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Coordinated inputs from the Departments of Horticulture, Entomology, Plant Science, Ag Engineering and Ag Economics.


8/85 – 1/88 Research Assistant, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

Assisted in data collection, data entry, and data analyses for several food marketing research projects. The studies focused primarily on optimal produce pricing strategies. A potato pricing study required extensive travel throughout upstate New York.


12/80 – 11/83 Research Assistant, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Contacted youth leaders in rural areas and conducted telephone surveys to assess the availability of leisure-time facilities for rural youth. Assisted in 40-year tracking study of rural youth to assess shifting migration patterns.


Page 9 Meg Meloy 7/05
MENTORING:


  • Graduate Students:




  • Selin Atalay (PhD student in Marketing; Co-chair of Dissertation Committee; Multiple Projects; Penn State)

  • Linda Barton (PhD student in Marketing at University of Manchester; Visiting Scholar, Penn State)

  • Kunter Gunasti (PhD student in Marketing; Project involving the compromise effect, Penn State)

  • Melea Press (PhD student Marketing; Committee member; Project involving alignability; Penn State)

  • Bela Florenthal (PhD student in Marketing; Committee member; Penn State) (8/04)

  • Sungwhan Yi (PhD student in Marketing; Committee member; Penn State) (5/04)

  • Barbara Lang (M.S. student in Food Marketing; Lecturer at Cornell’s Hotel School) (9/03)

  • Trent L. Preszler (M.S. student in Food Marketing at Cornell) (7/02)

  • John D. Martin (M.S. student in Food Science at Cornell) (7/02)

  • Kristine Gerard (M.S. student in Food Science at Cornell) (8/01)

  • Aristofanis Papadatos (M.S. student in Food Science at Cornell) (8/01)

  • Melissa Kaan (M.S. student in Textiles and Apparel at Cornell) (7/01)

  • Mark Pisoni (M.S. student in Agricultural Economics at Cornell) (7/01)

  • Ward Spiers (M.S. student in Food Science at Cornell) (5/01)

  • Meredith Fowlie (M.S. student in Resource Economics – proxy for defense) (12/00)

  • Maria Lacouture (M.P.S. student in Food Marketing at Cornell) (12/99)

  • Natalie Adkins (Ph.D. candidate at Virginia Tech; Assistant Professor at Creighton College)

  • Ron Hess (Ph.D. candidate at Virginia Tech; Assistant Professor at William and Mary)




  • Undergraduate Students:




  • Morgan Moran (Schreyer Honors College Marketing grad 8/05; Advisor)

  • Evan Grove (Schreyer Honors College Marketing grad 5/05; Advisor)

  • Joshua Hopp (Schreyer Honors College Marketing grad 5/05; Advisor)

  • Eileen LaFauci (Schreyer Honors College Marketing grad 5/05; Advisor)

  • Jennifer Jennings (Schreyer Honors College Marketing major; course project supervision).

  • Penn State Career Advising for Marketing majors (65+ advisees per semester)

  • Cornell Course and Career Advising (30+ advisees per semester)

  • Cornell Independent Study students (4+ per semester)

  • Advisor for Cornell Women’s Lacrosse Club (2000 – 2002)

  • Advisor for Virginia Tech’s student chapter of the American Marketing Association (100+ members) (1997-1999)


SERVICE:


  • Ad Hoc Reviewer:



  • Agricultural and Resource Economics Review (1999-present)

  • American Marketing Association Educators’ Conference (1996-present)

  • Journal of Advertising Research (2000 – present)

  • Journal of Consumer Research (1997 – present)

  • Journal of Retailing (2003)

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (2003 - present)

  • Sheth Foundation Dissertation Proposal Competition (2001 – present)

  • Society for Consumer Psychology Conference (2001 – present)




  • National Science Foundation: Proposal reviews for Decision, Risk, and Management Science Division of the NSF (2002 – present); Economics Division (2005)

Page 10 Meg Meloy 7/05


SERVICE (continued):


  • Program Committee: 30th Annual Meeting of the Association for Consumer Research and Conference (2001)




  • Outstanding Master’s Thesis Selection Committee: Northeast Agricultural Economics Association (2000, 2001)




  • University:




  • Penn State Omicron Delta Kappa Rejuvenation Committee (chaired by Art Carter, VP of Academic Affairs and Mike Meacham, Department of Health Policy Analysis; 2004 – present)

  • Judge for Graduate School Exhibit (2004 - present)

  • Represented Cornell at AACSB Deans meeting (April 2001 – New York City; April 2002 - Chicago)

  • Presentation to Cornell’s Undergraduate Business Program Advisory Board (May 2001 – Racine, WI)

  • Recruiting Committee for Director of Sloan Program, Department of Policy Analysis and Management, Cornell University (1999 – Keith Bryant, chair; 2000, 2001 – Don Kenkel, chair);




  • College:




  • Moderator, Smeal Branding Focus Groups (Penn State 2004)

  • Participant, Research Eminence Focus Group (Penn State 2004)

  • Participant, AACSB Accreditation Team Meeting with Assistant Professors (Penn State – 2003)

  • Participant, Strategic Planning Focus Group (Penn State – Don Hambrick moderator, 2002)

  • New Building Office Furniture Committee (Penn State - Dave Christie 2002)

  • Graduation Ceremonies attendee (1999 – present)

  • Undergraduate Course Evaluation Review Committee (Cornell – Don Viands, chair) (2001 – 2002)

  • Multi-cultural Diversity Committee (VT— Rich Sorenson, chair) (1997-1999)

  • Department Chair Recruiting Committee (VT—Jim Littlefield, chair) (1999)

  • Graduation Marshall (VT) (1996-1999)




  • Department:




  • PhD Committee (2005)

  • Subject Pool Coordinator (2003 - present)

  • Recruiting at AMA as non-committee member (2004)

  • Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (2004)

  • Faculty Recruiting Committee – Marketing (Penn State: 2003/2004 – Hans Baumgartner, chair; 2002/2003 – Wayne DeSarbo, chair)

  • Faculty Recruiting Committee – Marketing (Cornell: 2000 – Harry Kaiser, chair; 2001 – Ed McLaughlin and Bill Schulze, chairs )

  • Cornell Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (1999 – Dale Grossman, chair; 2000, 2001 – Ed McLaughlin, chair)

  • Reappointment Review Committee for Cornell AEM Accounting Instructor (1999, 2000 – Bob Milligan, chair)

  • Reviewed Cornell Handbook for Developing Horticultural Marketing Plans (1999)

  • Co-facilitated 9 day trip to California with 13 undergraduate “Food Fellows” (January 2002)

  • Faculty Recruiting Committee (VT—David Brinberg, chair) (1998)

  • Research Committee (VT—Kent Nakamoto, chair) (1997-1999)

Page 11 Meg Meloy 7/05
SERVICE (continued):


  • Community (marketing related):




  • Fundraising – Silent Auction – The Arts Festival, State College, PA (2003 – present)

  • Students in Consumer Behavior classes collected donations as part of a demonstration of various social influence techniques: 36 teams collected $1700 for The Second Mile (2005); 60 teams collected $2330 for The Youth Service Bureau (2004); 60 teams collected $1600 for The Second Mile (2003); 40 collected $1250 for The American Red Cross (2001); 35 collected $450 for UNICEF (2000).

  • Students developed Marketing Plans for local not-for-profits (1997-2002)

  • New Member Committee for Blacksburg Presbyterian Church (VT) (1997-1999)

  • Chair of Special Events Committee: Blacksburg Master Chorale (VT) (1997-1998)




  • Memberships:




  • Professional:

    • American Marketing Association

    • Association for Consumer Research

    • Food Distribution Research Society

    • Society for Consumer Psychology

    • Society for Judgment and Decision Making




  • Honor:

    • Who's Who in Business Higher Education

    • Omicron Delta Kappa

    • Gamma Sigma Delta

    • Golden Key




  • Community:

    • State College Presbyterian Church Chancel Choir


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