Klem-a-tis The name clematis means climbing in Greek




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Clematis (KLEM-a-tis)

The name clematis means climbing in Greek



Clematis are wonderful, fast growing vines that can give a long season of blooms by just knowing the bloom time of the many varieties. Most clematis varieties produce single flowers. Some varieties produce double flowers, others produce both single and double flowers.
How to Plant Your Clematis
This is the most important step to having success with clematis. A proper planting hole will ensure a long lived and happy vine.
Clematis need a cool, moist, deep root run, plenty of water and regular, balanced feeding. A pH of at or near 7.0 is ideal. Dig a hole eighteen inches deep by eighteen inches wide. Cover the bottom with a good rich compost or well rotted manure. A hand full of bone meal mixed with your soil is always a good idea. Add enough topsoil to cover the compost; now you are ready to plant. In well drained soil, place your well watered clematis in the hole so that about six inches of stem is below the soil line. In clay soils bury the stem to a depth of about 2”. The stem of your clematis needs to be woody before you bury it. If you are concerned about this, leave the final filling of the hole until later in the season. Planting a small shrub in front will insure a cool root run for the clematis.

Planting with Trees and Roses


Plant the clematis away from the direct base of the tree or shrub to avoid competition for moisture and nutrients. Prepare the planting area well applying as much compost as possible to provide and maintain moisture and nutrients. Avoid planting heavy, vigorous growing clematis in trees (c. Montana, c. Armandii)..

Roses and Clematis
Roses are ideal plants to support clematis - their cultivation needs are similar and they complement each other well. Clematis in groups C are the best because they can be cut back hard each year keeping them from overgrowing the rose.

Diseases and Pests
Clematis wilt can occur at any time, however it usually happens just as the flower buds begin to open. The whole plant can be affected or, only one or two of the stems will die back. If clematis wilt occurs, it is important to remove and destroy the affected stems including about one inch of the stem below the infection be removed. New shoots will soon appear at or below the soil line. Its very seldom that clematis wilt destroys a whole plant. If the problem persists the use of the fungicide benomyl will help.

Another fungus that might affect your clematis is mildew. It usually does not show until late in the season (August). Good air circulation will reduce the appearance. If mildew is noticed in its early stages it can be easily controlled by sulfur or neem oil.

Earwigs and slugs are the most common pest problems clematis have. Slugs and snails cause the most damage. If you want to be certain that no slug will get through use a bait with metaldyhide.

Pruning

The main purpose in pruning is to help plants produce the maximum number of flowers at a level, which we can see them. Annual pruning is best. Not all clematis can be pruned in the same way. There are three methods that can be applied to major groups depending on the time of year the plant flowers.


Group A: Early-flowering Clematis (Little or no pruning)


If you wish to prune these types because they have outgrown their space they should be pruned immediately after flowering. Hard pruning into the woody growth may result I the loss of the vine. You might want to reduce the plant size over two or three seasons rather than all at once: C. alpina, C. macropetala, C. armandii, C. montana and C. chrysocoma.


Group B: Large-flowered Hybrids


This category includes the early large-flowered forms including the double and semi-double cultivars. These plants produce their main flush of flowers in May and early June on stems made in the previous year so pruning is limited to cutting out dead or weak shoots in February. This is best achieved by working your way down from the top of each stem until you reach a healthy bud and then pruning just above it. Refrain from heavier pruning or you will have no early flowers. After the early flowers have finished you can prune back some of the flowered shoots to encourage new growth. This is also the time to cut back a plant that has outgrown its position or which has become an unsightly tangle at the top.

Group C: Late-flowering Clematis


Plants in this group flower on the last two to three feet of the current season's growth. Some types begin blooming in mid-June and continue into the fall. This is the easiest group to prune since no old wood needs to be maintained. In February or March cut each stem to a height of about two to three feet. This will include removal of some good stems and buds. Eventually the length of the bare stem at the base will increase as the vine matures. See list below for varieties in this group.

Clematis in Pruning Group B



 ANDROMEDA

HAKU-OKAN

MULTI BLUE

ARTIC QUEEN

H.E. YOUNG

MYOJO

ASAO

HENRYI

NELLY MOSER

BARBARA DIBLEY

HORN OF PLENTY

NIOBE

BARBARA JACKMAN

JACKMANII ALBA

PEVERIL PEARL

BEAUTY OF RICHMOND

JACKMANII RUBRA

PINK FANTASY

BEAUTY OF WORCESTER

JAMES MASON

POHJANAEL

BEES JUBILEE

JOAN PICTON

PRINS HENDRIK

BELLE NANTAISE

JOHN PAUL II

PROTEUS

BLUE RAVINE

JOHN WARREN

RAMONA

BRACEBRIDGE STAR

KATHLEEN DUNFORD

RICHARD PENNELL

BURMA STAR

KATHLEEN WHEELER

ROUGE CARDINAL

CHALCEDONY

KEITH RICHARDSON

ROYAL VELVET

CARDINAL WYSZYNSKI

KIRI TE KANAWA

ROYALTY

CARNABY

LADY CAROLINE NEVILL

RUBY GLOW

CARNIVAL QUEEN

LADY LONDESBOROUGH

SCARTHO GEM

CHARISSMA

LADY NORTHCLIFFE

SEALAND GEM

CORONA

LASURSTERN

SERENATA

COUNTESS OF LOVELACE

LIBERATION

SILVER MOON

CRIMSON KING

LINCOLN STAR

SNOW QUEEN

DANIEL DORONDA

LORD NEVILL

SUGAR CANDY

DAWN

LOUISE ROWE

SUNSET

DR. RUPPEL

MARCEL MOSER

SYLVIA DENNY

DUCHESS OF EDINBURGH

MARIE BOISSELOT

THE PRESIDENT

DUCHESS OF SUTHERLAND

MASQUERADE

THE VAGABOND

EDITH

MAUREEN

TWILIGHT

EDOUARD DESFOSSE

MISS BATEMAN

WADA'S PRIMROSE

ELSA SPATH

MISS CRAWSHAY

WARSZAWASKA NIKE

EMPRESS OF INDIA

MOONLIGHT

W E GLADSTONE

ETOILE DE PARIS

MRS BUSH

WILL GOODWIN

FAIR ROSAMOND

MRS CHOLMONDELEY

WILLIAM KENNETT

FAIRY QUEEN

MRS GEORGE JACKMAN

VICTORIA

FIREWORKS

MRS HOPE

VINO

GENERAL SIKORSKI

MRS JAMES MASON

VIOLET ELIZABETH

GILLIAN BLADES

MRS N THOMPSON

VYVAN PENNELL

Group C Clematis

Clematis addisonii

Clematis viticella

'John Huxtable'

Clematis aethusifolia

'Abundance'

'Kermesina'

Clematis x aromatica

'Alba Luxurians'

'Lady Betty Balfour'

Clematis x bonstedtii

'Arabella'

'Lady Bird Johnson'

Clematis campaniflora

'Ascotiensis'

'Madame Edouard Andre'

Clematis crispa

'Betty Corning'

'Madame Julia Correvon'

Clematis x durandii

'Bill MacKenzie'

'Madame Grange'

Clematis x eriostemon

'Black Prince'

'Margaret Hunt'

Clematis flammula

'Blue Angel'

'Margot Koster'

Clematis fusca

'Blue Boy'

'Minuet'

Clematis heracleifolia

'Comtesse de Bouchaud'

'Pagoda'

Clematis hirsutissima

'Duchess of Albany'

'Paul Farges'

Clematis integrifolia

'Dorothy Walton'

'Perle d'Azur'

Clematis x jouiniana

'Elvan'

'Perrin's Pride'

Clematis ladakhiana

'Ernest Markham'

'Pink Fantasy'

Clematis potataninii

'Etoile Rose'

'Polish Spirit'

Clematis recta

'Etoile Violette'

'Prince Charles'

Clematis rehderiana

'Gipsy Queen'

'Princess Dianna'

Clematis serratifolia

'Gravetye Beauty'

''Rhapsody'

Clematis songarica

'Guiding star'

'Rouge Cardinal'

Clematis tangutica

'Hagley hybrid'

'Royal Velours'

Clematis texensis

'Huldine'

'Venosa Violacea'

Clematis tibetana

'Jackmanii'

'Victoria'

Clematis x triternata

'Jackmanii Superba'

Ville de Lyon'

Information from the American and British Clematis Societies

http://clematis.org/

http://www.britishclematis.org.uk/


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