Juncus biglumis L. (1753), Sp. Pl. 328. S 2n=




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Subgen. Alpini (Engelm.) Buch. (1880), Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 1: 118.

B Juncus taxon Alpini Engelm. ***

S Sect. Terminiflori Peterm. ***; sect. Alpini (Engelm.) Vierh. ***
35.1.12  Juncus biglumis L. (1753), Sp. Pl. 328.

S

2n= (1) 60. (2) 100. (3) 120.



2nD (1) Knaben & Engelskjøn (1967 N Norw). (2) Löve & Löve (1975) list four counts, three as arctic. (3) Löve & Löve (1975) list five counts, three as arctic.

G ICE NOR RUS SIB RFE ALA CAN GRL

Comments:
35.1.13  Juncus longirostris Kuvaev (1972), Bot. Zhurn. 57 (7): 815.

S

2n=



2nD

G SIB RFE

Comments:

(1) Distribution in the Anadyr drainage area is to be examined. (Egorova)

(2) We need to know a little more about this species before evaluation. (Elven)
35.1.14  Juncus triglumis L. (1753), Sp. Pl. 328.

S

Comments:



(1) Porsild (1957, 1964) and Porsild & Cody (1980) refer all Canadian populations of J. triglumis s. lat. (at least east of Mackenzie River), as well as the Greenland populations, to J. albescens, whereas Hultén (1968) considers J. triglumis s. str. to be circumpolar. In many parts of Chukotka tundra (on base-saturated soils) both taxa are sympatric, which is true even of the only locality in the very center of Wrangel Isl. where J. triglumis s. l. occurs. (Yurtsev)

(2) The ploidy difference is an argument for recognition of J. triglumis and J. albescens as species, but the morphological and geographical data are ambiguous. A correlation between ploidy level and morphology is still not well established (Löve & Löve 1956 reported, e.g., both 2n = 50 and 2n = c. 134 from Iceland where only J. triglumis s. str. should occur). At least one of the 'triglumis' counts are American, disproving an American (albescens) and Eurasian (triglumis) disjunction. In wait for a future clarification, I am strongly in favour of subspecific status for these two and have entered them as such. Moore & Clemants (2000) accept both (as varieties) for N America, with 'albescens' as the most widespread. (Elven)

(3) Juncus albescens looks like the North American race of J. triglumis s. lat. (with a higher chromosome number), with secondary overlapping in Asian and American Beringia. Svalbard seems to have received its population of J. triglumis s. l. from Greenland. The rank of subspecies for the both taxa could be acceptable, too. (Yurtsev)
35.1.14.1  Juncus triglumis L. subsp. triglumis

S J. triglumis L. var. triglumis

2n= (1) 44. (2) 50. (3) c. 134.

2nD (1) Taylor & Mulligan (1968 N Am). (2) Löve & Löve (1975) list two counts, one Icelandic. (3) Löve & Löve (1956 Icel, not included as such by Löve & Löve 1975).

G ICE NOR RUS SIB RFE ALA? CAN? GRL?

Comments:


35.1.14.2  Juncus triglumis L. subsp. albescens (Lange) Hultén (1962), Circump. Pl. 1: 241.

B J. triglumis L. var. albescens Lange (1880). Consp. Fl. Groenl. 123.

S J. albescens (Lange) Fernald (1924), Rhodora 26: 202.

2n= (1) c. 130. (2) 132. (3) c. 134.

2nD (1) Jørgensen et al. (1958 Grl). (2) Moore & Clemants (2000, Fl. N. Amer. 22, secondary reference). (3) Holm (1952 Grl).

G NOR RFE ALA CAN GRL

Comments:

(1) The rank of this taxon [as species] is to be revised. (Egorova)


35.1.15  Juncus castaneus Sm. (1800), Fl. Brit. 1: 383.

S

Comments:



(1) Egorova proposes the two entities below as species. The status of them   as species or subspecies   should be discussed. Hultén (1943: 428) accepted them at first as species but changed his opinion to subspecies (Hultén 1967: 31) after investigation of a larger material. I have here followed Hultén, also because they seem to intergrade efficiently in Alaska.

There is also a question about the NE American material. There are plants from eastern Canada (e.g. from S Baffin Island: Iqaluit) very different from Eurasiatic J. castaneus s. str. (Elven)


35.1.15.1  Juncus castaneus Sm. subsp. castaneus

S

2n= (1) 40. (2) 60.



2nD (1) Löve & Löve (1956 Icel, not included by Löve & Löve 1975). (2) Löve & Löve (1975) list three counts, two as arctic.

G ICE NOR RUS SIB RFE ALA CAN GRL

Comments:
35.1.15.2  Juncus castaneus Sm. subsp. leucochlamys (Zinger ex V. Krecz.) Hultén (1967), Ark. Bot., ser. 2, 7, 1: 31.

B J. leucochlamys Zinger ex V. Krecz. (1931), Fl. Transbaical. 2: 141.

S J. leucochlamys Zinger ex V. Krecz. subsp. borealis (Tolm.) Novikov (1985), Sosud. Rast. Sovet. Dal'nego Vostoka 1: 74 [basionym: J. leucochlamys Zinger ex V. Krecz. var. borealis Tolm. (1963), Fl. Arct. URSS 4: 21].

2n= (1) >90. (2) ca 120.

2nD (1) ? (2) ?

G SIB RFE ALA

Comments:

(1) Egorova's J. leucochlamys subsp. borealis is tentatively entered only in the synonymy. Another solution would be to accept it as a subspecies of J. castaneus. Moore & Clemants (2000) are reluctant to accept the 'leucochlamys' entity at all. Subspecies is therefore a compromise between the Russian and North American opinions. (Elven)


35.1.16  Juncus stygius L. (1759), Syst. Nat., ed. 10, 2: 987.

S

Comments:



(1) Species and subspecies added to Egorova's draft as it is mapped from the arctic parts on the west side of Hudson Bay by Hultén & Fries (1986). It is also given from here (Eskimo Point, 61N) by Scoggan (1978) and mapped from two areas along Hudson Bay by Moore & Clemants (2000). (Elven)
35.1.16.1  Juncus stygius L. subsp. americanus (Buchenau) Hultén (1944), Lunds. Univ. Årsskr., n. f., avd. 2, 39: 431.

B J. stygius L. var. americanus Buchenau in Engl. (1890), Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 12: 393.

S

2n=


2nD

G CAN


Comments:
Subgen. Septati Buch. (1875), Abh. Naturwiss. Ver. Bremen 4: 406.

S Sect. Ozophyllum Dumort. ***; sect. Septati (Buch.) Vierh. ***

Comments:

(1) Two other species are mapped very close to our arctic border in Canada by Moore & Clemants (2000): J. brevicaudatus (Engelm.) Fern. (1904), Rhodora 6: 35, basionym: J. canadensis J. Gay var. brevicaudatus Engelm. (1866), Trans. Acad. Sci. St. Louis 2: 436, in the eastern Hudson Bay area; and J. pelocarpus E. Mey. (1823), Syn. Luzul. 30, close to northern James Bay. (Elven)


35.1.17  Juncus subtilis E. Mey. (1823), Syn. Luzul. 31.

S

2n= 40.



2nD Jørgensen et al. (1958 Grl).

G CAN GRL

Comments:

(1) This species reaches the Arctic also in Quebec in E Hudson Bay and Ungava and probably in Ontario. (Elven)


35.1.18  Juncus articulatus L. (1753), Sp. Pl. 327.

S

2n= 80.



2nD Löve & Löve (1975) list several counts, one Icelandic; Fearn (1977 W Eur); Engelskjøn (1979 N Norw).

G ICE SIB

Comments:

(1) The material behind the report(s) from Siberia should perhaps be checked. (Elven)


35.1.19  Juncus alpinoarticulatus Chaix (1785), Fl. Vap. 74.

S J. alpinus Villars (1787), nom. illegit., Hist. Pl. Dauphiné 2: 233.

T Switzerland: Oberstafel ('N:o 4 Ober Staffel'), leg. Haller (P) lectotype selected by Hämet-Ahti (1980, Ann. Bot. Fenn. 17: 342).

Comments:

(1) First valid publication also given as: Chaix in Villars (1786), Hist. Pl. Dauphiné 1: 378. (Elven)

(2) The North Atlantic material (GRL, ICE, NOR and RUS) needs to be re-evaluated before it can be divided with any certainty upon the two listed subspecies. These subspecies are difficult to apply also in the area where they are described (Scandinavia). (Elven)


35.1.19.1  Juncus alpinoarticulatus Chaix subsp. nodulosus (Wahlenb.) Hämet-Ahti (1980), Ann. Bot. Fenn. 17: 342.

B J. nodulosus Wahlenb. (1820), Fl. Upsal. 114.

S J. alpinus Vill. subsp. nodulosus (Wahlenb.) Lindm. (1918), Svensk Fanerogamfl. 155; J. leschenaultii auct., non J. Gay ex La Harpe (1827).

T Sweden: Juncus alpinus Vill., Upsala, på Mälarns strand bortom Vårdsätra, 25.08.1819, Wahlenberg scripsit (UPS) lectotype, selected by Moberg & Nilsson (1991, Nord. J. Bot. 11: 297).

2n= 40.

2nD Löve & Löve (1975) list five counts, two as arctic.

G RUS SIB RFE ALA CAN

Comments:

(1) The report of J. leschenaultii by Tikhomirov & Gavrilyuk (1966) and Hultén (1968, 1974) for hot springs at the southeast of the Chukotka Peninsula refers to material re-examined and found to belong to J. alpinoarticulatus. (Egorova & Yurtsev)
35.1.19.2  Juncus alpinoarticulatus Chaix subsp. alpestris (Hartm.) Hämet-Ahti (1980), Ann. Bot. Fenn. 17: 342.

B J. alpestris Hartm. (1820), Handb. Scand. Fl., ed. 1, 141.

S J. alpinus Vill. subsp. alpestris (Hartm.) Á. Löve & D. Löve (1948), Rep. Dept. Agric. Univ. Inst. Appl. Sci. (Reykjavik), ser. B, 3: 23.

T [Sweden: Quickjock, leg. Laestadius (UPS? S?)].

2n= 40.

2nD Snogerup (1972 Scand).

G ICE NOR RUS GRL

Comments:


35.1.20  Juncus nodosus L. (1762), Sp. Pl., ed. 2, 466.

S

2n= 40.



2nD Moore & Clemants (2000, Fl. N. Amer. 22, secondary reference).

G CAN


Comments:
35.1.21  Juncus supinus Moench (1777), Enum. Pl. Hass. 1: 167.

S J. bulbosus auct., non L. (1753).

2n= 40.

2nD Löve & Löve (1975) list seven counts, one Icelandic; Snogerup in Engelskjøn (1979 Norw).

G ICE

Comments: Subsp. supinus in the Arctic.



(1) There still seems to be some doubt whether the Linnaean name from 1753 can be validated for this species. Juncus bulbosus L. (1762) refers to J. compressus Jacq. (1762). (Elven)
35.1.22  Juncus mertensianus Bong. (1833), Mém. Acad. Imp. Sci. St.-Pétersb., sér. 6, Sci. Math. 2: 167.

S J. slwookoorum S. Young (1970), Rhodora 72: [486-488].

2n= 40.

2nD Moore & Clemants (2000, Fl. N. Amer. 22, secondary reference).



G ALA

Comments:



(1) Juncus slwookoorum was described and typified from St. Lawrence Island: Boxer Bay. It is synonymised with J. mertensianus by Moore & Clemants (2000) and the latter species is thereby present in the Arctic as we define it. Therefore added to Egorova's draft. (Elven)


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