History and foundations of sociological theory




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SYLLABUS

SOCI 303

HISTORY AND FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY
Fall 2008

Instructor: Deniz Yükseker

Class: Tuesday-Thursday 12:30-13:45 at CAS Z48

Office: SOS 254 ext. 1309

Office Hours: Wednesday 11:30-12:30, Thursday 14:30-16:00, and by appointment

e-mail: dyukseker@ku.edu.tr


(Check the Courseware pages for SOCI 202 regularly for additional material and announcements)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to classical sociological theory (with an emphasis on Durkheim, Marx and Weber). Contemporary theoretical perspectives on structural-functionalism, gender inequality and postmodernism are also explored. Emphasis is placed on understanding the theoretical constructs as well as on applying them in the analysis of current social issues.
REQUIREMENTS: (1) You should attend class regularly. Attendance is a must for your success in this course. (2) You should do the reading assignments for each week BEFORE coming to class. The readings are intense and some are difficult. Therefore you should read carefully and make sure to keep up with the reading load. (3) There will be one midterm exam and a final. (4) Also, there will be three quizzes on the reading materials and lectures.
BREAKDOWN OF GRADES:

Attendance and participation: 10 percent

Quizzes: 3 x 10 points = 30 percent

Midterm exam: 30 percent

Final exam: 30 percent
NOTE ON ATTENDANCE:

0-2 absences: no penalty

3-4 absences: - 5 points

5-6 absences: - 7 points

More than 6 absences: - 10 points
SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT GUIDELINES ON ACADEMIC HONESTY

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is a serious academic offense and students are responsible for learning what constitutes plagiarism. The university defines plagiarism as “borrowing or using someone else’s writing or ideas without giving written acknowledgment to the author”; therefore, by definition, plagiarism is a form of cheating. In some instances, such as copying an entire paper from the internet, submitting papers someone else wrote for the student (other students, online services, parents, etc.), or selling papers to other students, plagiarism is intentional. In other cases, plagiarism may occur unintentionally. However, even when unintentional, plagiarism reflects the student’s unwillingness to conform to university policies and course requirements. Therefore, all acts of plagiarism will be severely penalized regardless of intention.

In order to avoid plagiarism, students must give credit to the author when they use someone else’s idea, theory, statistics, or fact from any source (e.g., journal or newspaper article, book, the internet, etc.), unless that piece of information is considered common knowledge. How to give credit to the author may depend on the instructor’s guidelines, but students usually need to provide citations in the text with the source identified in a bibliography or in footnotes. Direct quotations from any source should be put in quotation marks and cited. Paraphrasing (i.e., using someone else’s ideas but explaining them in your own words) without citation is also a form of plagiarism. It is the students’ responsibility to check with the instructor if an act would constitute plagiarism before submitting their work.

Plagiarized work will receive a zero for that assignment. Depending on the severity of the offense, the instructor may give the student an F for the entire course and pursue disciplinary action.



Cheating:

Cheating is, in an examination or an assignment, using materials (such as textbooks, class notes, dictionaries, or other students’ work) that are not explicitly allowed by the instructor. Any student caught cheating or helping others to cheat receives a zero for the specific examination or assignment. The instructor may give the student an F for the entire course and pursue disciplinary action.


Schedule:
Week 1: September 16-18

Introduction: Why Should We Study Sociology?
C. Wright Mills, “The Sociological Imagination” (in Charles Lemert, Social Theory. The Multicultural and Classical Readings, 1999) (photocopy distributed in class)
Week 2: September 23-25

The Birth of Sociology
Peter Hamilton, “The Enlightenment and the Birth of Social Science,” in Modernity. An Introduction to Modern Societies, pp. 19-54.
ŞEKER BAYRAMI
Week 3: October 7-9

Karl Marx
Randall Collins, “The Conflict Tradition,” in Four Sociological Traditions (1994), pp. 47-81.

Marx: Excerpts from The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, Economic and Political Manuscripts of 1844, Das Kapital, vol. 1, The Communist Manifesto (in Charles Lemert, Social Theory. The Multicultural and Classical Readings, 1999, pp. 29-49 and 51-66).

Note: I will announce particular page no’s in Lemert’s book for each week.
Week 4: October 14-16

Karl Marx (cont’d)
Week 5: October 21-23

Max Weber
Randall Collins, “The Conflict Tradition,” in Four Sociological Traditions (1994), pp. 81-92.

Weber, Excerpts from The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism and Economy and Society, (in Lemert, Social Theory. The Multicultural and Classical Readings, 1999, pp. 99-125).

Note: I will announce particular page no’s in Lemert’s book for each week.
Week 6: October 30 (no class on October 28)

Weber (cont’d)
Week 7: November 4-6

Emile Durkheim
Randall Collins, “The Durkheimian Tradition” pp. 181-193 and 211-214 in Four Sociological Traditions (1994).

Emile Durkheim, Excerpts from Suicide, The Division of Labor in Society, and Elementary Forms of the Religious Life (in Lemert, Social Theory: The Multicultural and Classical Readings, 1999, pp. 69-82 and 89-99).

Note: I will announce particular page no’s in Lemert’s book for each week.

Week 8: November 11-13



Review and Midterm
Week 9: November 18-20

Structural-Functionalism
Randall Collins, “Two Wings: The Macro Tradition,” in Four Sociological Traditions, 1994, pp. 193-203.

Talcott Parsons, “Sex Roles in the American Kinship System”

Robert Merton, “Manifest and Latent Functions” (both in Lemert, Social Theory. The Multicultural and Classical Readings, 1999, pp. 300-309).
Week 10: November 25-27

Challenges to Classical Social Theory: Women
Frederick Engels, “The Patriarchal Family” (in Lemert, , Social Theory. The Multicultural and Classical Readings, 1999, pp. 66-69)

Patricia M. Lengermann and Jill Niebrugge-Brantley, “Modern Feminist Theory,” Modern Sociological Theory (6th Edition), pp. 302-346.

Dorothy Smith, “Women’s Experience as a Radical Critique of Sociology,” in The Conceptual Practices of Power (1990).

Patricia Hill Collins, “Black Feminist Thought in the Matrix of Domination” (in Lemert, Social Theory. The Multicultural and Classical Readings, 1999)


Week 11: December 2-4

Cont’d
KURBAN BAYRAMI
Week 12: December 16-18

Challenges to Modernity: Postmodernism and Poststructuralism
George Ritzer and Douglas Goodman, “Structuralism, Poststructuralism and the Emergence of Postmodern Social Theory,” Modern Sociological Theory (6th Edition), pp. 449-486.
Week 13: December 23-25

Challenges to Modernity: Focus on Michel Foucault
Michel Foucault, “Truth and Power” pp. 51-75 and “Docile Bodies” pp. 179-187 (all in Paul Rabinow, ed. The Foucault Reader, 1984)
Week 14: December 30 (No class on January 1)

Foucault (cont’d)
Week 15: December 6-8

Review for final exam






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