Chlorops melanocera




Дата канвертавання19.04.2016
Памер12.59 Kb.
9145F CHLOROPS MELANOCERA LOEW
Designation given to rearings of Chlorops melanocera Loew, 1863: 49. This species ranges from MT to PQ and MA and south to NC and LA.

Nothing is known of its biology or larval feeding habits. The immature stages are undescribed.

Rearing records are:
SUMMARY OF LIFE CYCLE DATA

LARVAL HABITAT: Stems of Juncus tenuis (path rush) (OH)

HABITAT: Stands of Juncus tenuis (path rush) (OH)

OVERWINTERING STAGE:

FIRST SEASONAL RECORD: VI-21 (OH)

LAST SEASONAL RECORD:

GENERATIONS/YEAR:

DIAPAUSE STAGE:

ADULT LONGEVITY:

FECUNDITY:

PRE-MATING PERIOD:

PRE-OVIPOSITION PERIOD:

OVIPOSITION SITE:

INCUBATION PERIOD:

FIRST STADIUM:

SECOND STADIUM:

THIRD STADIUM:

TOTAL LARVAL PERIOD:

PRE-PUPAL PERIOD:

PUPAL PERIOD:

PUPATION SITE:

LARVAL FEEDING HABITS: Mines stems of Juncus tenuis (OH)

ENEMIES:

NICHE ASSOCIATES:


VI-21-92

In examining adults of a species of Chlorops swept from a small, mowed stand of Eleocharis obtusa growing near the new 89.7 radio station, I identified C. melanocera, a species for which we have no host plant records. Because of the mixed nature of the stand here, I am not sure whether the flies had emerged from Eleocharis or some other species of grass or sedge growing in the area. Interestingly, no Chlorops obscuricornis, a common species on Eleocharis smallii now, was swept from E. obtusa. We have several pinned specimens of C. melanocera, and these freshly collected specimens agree well with the pinned material. The big difference in C. melanocera is that this species has the palpi blackened apically, whereas the palpi in C. obscuricornis are entirely yellow from base to apex.

Another interesting difference in the two species of Eleocharis is that I collected five specimens of D. nigripes from Eleocharis obtusa, but none from E. ?.
VI-22-92


Swept a stand of some mowed monocot (Juncus tenuis?) growing somewhat upslope from the small stand of E. obtusa near the new channel 89.7 building. I obtained three specimens of C. melanocera suggesting that this particular monocot serves as the host plant of that species. Interestingly, I obtained only one specimen of C. melanocera in my weekly sampling of the Eleocharis obtusa stand here. No C. melanocera adults were taken in the weekly samples of the two stands of .

VI-22-92


Swept a stand of J. tenuis, path rush, growing in the school yard behind Walls School (10 back and forth sweeps). I will continue to take weekly samples from this stand, as it is nearly a monoculture. I will establish a spreadsheet to record the weekly data. So far, it has not been mowed. The most interesting catch were 49 adults of Chlorops melanocera, a find that strongly indicates that the host plant of this species is J. tenuis. The host plant was previously unknown. My capture of a few adults of that species in the E. obtusa stand was a reflection of the fact that individuals of J. tenuis grew intermixed with the spike-rush. Other species taken in the path rush stand were: D. versicolor (2), Incertella minor (1), R. carbonaria (3), O. petrei (1), Chymomyza amoena (1), Scaptomyza pallida (10), Cerodontha dorsalis (1), Mumetopia occipitalis (1), undetermined Anthomyiidae (1), and undetermined Agromyzidae (4).

Also examined 20 stems of J. tenuis for eggs and/or larvae of Chlorops or Diplotoxa. None was found, although two stems showed feeding damage.


VI-29-92

I swept small stands of Carex spp., Juncus. effusus and Scirpus validus, growing along the reservoir at Barkcamp State Park in Belmont Co., OH., but encountered no adults of Chloropidae.


V-17-2004

I obtained some 10 adults of C. melanocera while sweeping the grasses and rushes at the Kent Walls School playground area. Juncus tenuis was quite abundant, and I suspect that these flies were associated with that species.






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