Bes 489 Spring 2006




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BES 489 Spring 2006



The Land - Water Interface:

Ecology of freshwater & marine water margins


April 16






Field Trip Schedule






Time Activity

6:00 Depart UWB surface parking lot (south of parking garage)

7:30 - 9:30 Freshwater wetlands: Anacortes City Forest

10:00 - 11:45 Rocky intertidal: Deception Pass State Park

11:45 - 12:15 Lunch

1:00 - 4:00 Estuaries & tidal marshes: Port Susan Bay Preserve

5:30 Arrive UWB

I. Freshwater Wetlands: Anacortes City Forest


The City of Anacortes Forest Reserve is well-developed second growth upland forest, with most canopy elements being from 80-100 years old. The city acquired the reserve just after logging in the early 1900s. Complex topography, active beaver populations and near surface bedrock outcrops have combined to produce a wonderfully-diverse set of biological communities. Our focus here will be a quick look at some of the forested wetlands, ranging from minerotrophic wetlands to fens (with some bog elements). Most of these wetlands have been created, developed, and are constantly altered through the prodigious activities of beavers. The forested wetlands are dominated by deciduous canopy species. A rich variety of floating aquatic, emergent and shoreline vegetation communities are evident.


Common Wetland Plant Species (& associates) of the Anacortes City Forest

Trees:

Big leaf Maple (Acer macrophyllum) FACU

Douglas-fir (Psuedotsuga menzeisii) FACU

Grand fir (Abies grandis) FACU-

Red alder (Alnus rubra) FAC

Shore pine (Pinus contorta) FAC

Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis) FAC

Western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) FACU-

Western red cedar(Thuja plicata) FAC
Shrubs:

Bog laurel (Kalmia microphylla) FACW

Hardhack (Spirea douglasii) FACW

Hazelnut (Corylus cornuta) FACU

Labrador Tea (Ledum groenlandicum) FACW

Nootka Rose (Rosa nootkana) FAC

Red-osier

dogwood (Cornus sericea) FACW

Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis) FAC+

Snowberry (Symphoricarpus albus) FACU

Swamp

Gooseberry (Ribes lacustre) FAC+



Twinberry (Lonicera involucrata) FAC+

Vine maple (Acer circinatum) FAC-

Willow (Salix sp.) FAC - FACW
Herbaceous:

American

speedwell (Veronica americanum) OBL

Bedstraw (Galium trifidum) FACW+

Common cattail (Typha latifolia) OBL

Creeping

buttercup* (Ranunculus repens) FACW
Herbaceous (cont.):

Deer fern (Blechnum spicant) FAC+

Enchanter’s

nightshade (Circea alpina) FAC+

Field horsetail (Equisetum arvense) FAC

Foamflower (Tiarella trifoliata) FAC-

Hedge nettle (Stachys cooleyae) FACW

Lady fern (Athyrium felix-femina) FAC

Large-leaved

avens (Geum macrophyllum) FACW-

Pacific waterleaf (Hydrophyllum tenuipes) NS

Reed


canarygrass* (Phalaris arundinacea) FACW

Sedges (Carex sp.) FAC – FACW

Skunk cabbage (Lysichiton americanum) OBL

Small-fruited

bulrush (Scirpus microcarpus) OBL

Soft rush (Juncus effusus) FACW

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) FAC+

Tall mannagrass (Glyceria elata) FACW+

Water parsley (Oenanthe sarmentosa) OBL

Waterpepper (Polygonum hydropiper) OBL

Yellow iris* (Iris psuedacorus) OBL

Yellow


monkeyflower (Mimulus guttatus) OBL

Youth-on-age (Tolmiea menziesii) FAC


Aquatic Bed Species:

Floating-leaved

pondweed (Potamogeton natans) OBL

Yellow pond-lily (Nuphar polysepalum) OBL

Duckweed (Lemna minor) OBL

*
Thanks to Jim Evans for help with this information !


Exotic species

Abbreviation

Status

Definition

OBL

Obligate wetland species

> 99% of occurrences are in wetlands

FACW

Facultative wetland species

67 – 99% of occurrences are in wetlands

FAC

Facultative species

33-67% of occurrences are in wetlands

NS

No indicator status

No determination yet made for this species

II. Rocky Intertidal: Rosario Head, Deception Pass State Park




We will begin our field trip by examining the biological communities along a rocky shore at Deception Pass State Park. We will look at vertical zonation of communities and organisms and discuss the underlying causes of the patterns. We will examine 4 intertidal zones:



Our Zone Name Location Scientific Name

Upper intertidal > 8 ft above MLT* Supralittoral fringe

Upper-mid intertidal 4 – 8 ft above MLT Midlittoral zone

Lower-mid intertidal 0 – 4 ft above MLT Midlittoral zone

Lower intertidal below MLT Infralittoral fringe

* MLT is the mean low tide level


Our exploration of the intertidal will focus on the biotic and abiotic factors that control organism distribution as well as the key controls over biological diversity on a rocky intertidal landscape. We will be able to examine the upper three zones. Some of the common organisms we may see and discuss are listed below.
1. Upper Intertidal Zone

Vascular Plants:

Armeria maritima (thrift)

Plantago maritima (seaside plantain)

Lichens:

Caloplaca sp. (orange crustose lichen)

Verrucaria sp. (black crustose lichen)

Xanthoria candelaria (yellow crustose lichen)

Algae:

Enteromorpha intestinalis (common along freshwater seeps)

Prasiola meridionalis

Invertebrates:

Amphipods

Isopods (e.g, Ligia pallasii – in sheltered niches)

Limpets (e.g., Collisela digitalis)

Periwinkles (Littorina sp.)

Red Mite (Neomolgus littoralis)





2. Upper-Mid Intertidal Zone

Lichens:

Caloplaca sp. (orange crustose lichen)

Verrucaria sp. (black crustose lichen)

Xanthoria candelaria (yellow crustose lichen)

Algae:

Alaria marginata (tidepools)

Bangia fuscopurppurea

Costaria costata

Enteromorpha intestinalis

Fucus distichus (rockweed)

Laminaria saccharina

Prasiola meridionalis

Invertebrates & other animals:

Barnacles (Chthamalus dalli, Balanus glandula)

Hermit crabs (Pagurus hirsutiusculus and other species)

Isopods (Ligia pallasii, idotea wosnesenskii, etc.)

Limpets (e.g., Collisela digitalis, Notoacmea sp.)

Periwinkles (Littorina sp.)

Snails (e.g., Nucella sp.)

Tidepool sculpin (Oligocottus maculosus)




3. Lower – Mid Intertidal Zone

Algae:

Alaria marginata (tidepools)

Bangia fuscopurpurea

Corrallina sp. (tidepools)

Costaria costata

Fucus distichus (rockweed)

Halosaccion glandiforme

Hedophyllum sessile

Iridaea cordata (tidepools)

Laminaria saccharina

Microcladia borealis

Spongomorpha coalita

Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce)
Invertebrates & other animals:

Barnacles (Balanus glandula & B. cariosus)

Chitons (e.g., Katharina tunicata - black chiton)

Crabs (various species, e.g., Hemigrapsus sp.)

Hermit crabs (Pagurus hirsutiusculus and other species)

Isopods (Ligia pallasii, idotea wosnesenskii, etc.)

Limpets (e.g., Collisela digitalis, Notoacmea sp.)

Mussels (Mytilus edulis)

Periwinkles (Littorina sp.)

Sea anemones (Anthopleura eligantissima, A. xanthogrammica, etc.)

Sea stars (e.g., Pisaster ochraceus – ochre sea star)

Snails (e.g., Nucella sp.)

Tidepool sculpin (Oligocottus maculosus)



4. Lower Intertidal Zone

Vascular plants:

Phyllospadix scouleri (surfgrass)

Zostera marina (eelgrass)

Algae:

Agarum fimbriatum

Alaria marginata

Alaria marginata

Corallina sp.

Costaria costata

Desmarestia ligulata

Egregia menziesii

Gigartina exasperata

Halosaccion glandiforme

Hedophyllum sessile

Iridaea cordata

Laminaria groenlandica

Laminaria saccharina

Nereocystis luetkeana


Invertebrates & other animals:

Bivalves (scallops, clams, etc.)

Chitons (e.g., Cryptochiton, K. tunicata, etc.)

Crabs (various species, e.g., Hemigrapsus sp.) & Shrimp

Fish (various species)

Hermit crabs

Limpets (e.g., Acmea sp., C. digitalis, Notoacmea sp.)

Sea anemones (Anthopleura eligantissima, A. xanthogrammica, etc.)

Sea cucumbers (e.g., Cucumaria sp.)

Sea slugs

Sea sponges

Sea stars (e.g., Pisaster ochraceus – ochre sea star)

Sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus sp.)

Snails (e.g., Nucella sp.)

Worms: flatworms, nemerteans, polychaetes



III. Estuaries & Tidal Marshes:

Port Susan Bay Preserve
The following introductory material is largely excerpted from The Nature Conservancy web site:

http://www.nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/washington/preserves/art6837.html

The 4,122-acre Port Susan Bay Preserve is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy of Washington. It is a rich mosaic of estuarine ecosystems located at the mouth of the Stillaguamish River, where it flows into Port Susan Bay. Most of the preserve is a vast expanse of estuarine wetland, tidally influenced channels, and mudflats, straddling the southern and northern mouths of the Stillaguamish River (although up to 85% of these tidal marshes have been altered in some way from the extensive diking of the late 19th and 20th centuries). There are also 160 acres of upland habitat that have been diked.

The Port Susan Bay Preserve safeguards some of the finest estuarine habitat in the Puget  Sound. Its emergent marshes, vast mudflats, and tidally influenced channels support hundreds of thousands of birds, several species of salmon, herring, hake and clams. Western sandpipers, dunlins, and dowitchers swoop over the mudflats. Wrangell Island snow geese gather by the thousands on nearby fields. And hundreds of raptors, from peregrine falcons to short-eared owls, add to the drama. It is one of the most important stops along the pacific Flyway. This is also where the Stillaguamish River flows into Port Susan Bay, creating an important transition between marine and freshwater habitats, critical for salmon. Pink, coho, chum and the federally listed chinook salmon all thrive here, as well as steelhead and sea-run cutthroat trout.



The past & future:

Some land acquisitions take time, and so it did at Port Susan Bay. The property, located three miles south of Stanwood, had long been identified by biologists and ornithologists as one of the private parcels in the region most in need of conservation. In 1990, staff at The Nature Conservancy began talking to the landowner, Menno Groeneveld, about a possible sale. Menno, the son of a Dutch immigrant, was interested in selling the land but passed away before negotiations were completed. After his death, the Conservancy began working with the bank appointed to oversee Menno’s estate. In 2001, 11 years after discussions first began, the transaction was completed. Grants and funding provided by The Rathmann Family Foundation, WRQ, Inc., and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service were critical in the purchase.



The Conservancy plans to manage the property in a way that benefits the estuary and wetlands, the salmon, birds, and other wildlife. Public use consistent with these management objectives will be allowed. The Conservancy is currently working on a management plan for the preserve.


Port Susan Bay Preserve Plant List

* indicates exotic species













Trees




Monocots

Alnus rubra

red alder




Agropyron repens *

quackgrass










Agrostis spp

bentgrass

Shrubs




Bromus sitchensis

Sitka brome

Lonicera involucrata

black twinberry




Calamagrostis spp

reedgrasses

Mahonia aquifolium

Tall oregon grape




Carex lyngbyei

Lyngby's sedge

Rubus discolor *

Himalayan blackberry




Carex spp

sedges

Rubus laciniatus *

evergreen blackberry




Deschampsia cespitosa

tufted hairgrass

Sambucus racemosa

red elderberry




Distichlis spicata

seashore saltgrass










Eleocharis acicularis

needle spikerush

Herbs




Eleocharis palustris

creeping spike-rush

Achillea millefolium

yarrow




Festuca spp.

fescue grasses

Aster subspicatus

Douglas' aster




Hordeum brachyantherum

meadow barley

Atriplex patula

spearscale




Holcus lanatus *

common velvet-grass

Brassica campestris *

field mustard




Holcus mollis *

creeping velvet-grass

Cirsium arvense *

Canada thistle




Juncus acuminatus

tapertip rush

Cirsium vulgare *

bull thistle




Juncus articulatus

jointed rush

Convolvulus arvensis *

field bindweed




Juncus balticus

Baltic rush

Cotula coronopifolia *

brass buttons




Juncus bufonius

toad rush

Conioselinum pacificum

Pacific hemlock-parsley




Juncus effusus

common rush

Crepis capillaris *

smooth hawksbeard




Lolium multiforum *

Italian ryegrass

Dipsacus sylvestris *

teasel




Phalaris arundinacea *

reed canary grass

Epilobium ciliatum

purple-leaved willowherb




Phragmites australis *

common reed

Equisetum fluviatile

water horsetail




Puccinellia spp

alkali grass

Galium spp

bedstraw




Rhynchospora alba

white beak-rush

Glaux maritima

sea milk-wort




Ruppia maritima

ditch-grass

Heracleum lanatum

Cow-parsnip




Scirpus americanus

American bulrush

Hypochaeris radicata *

Hairy cat's ear




Scirpus lacustris

tule

Lactuca serriola *

prickly lettuce




Scirpus maritimus

seacoast bulrush

Lilaeopsis occidentalis

western lilaeopsis




Spartina anglica *

common cordgrass

Lotus denticulatus

meadow birds-foot trefoil




Torreyochloa pauciflora

weak alkali grass

Lysichiton americanum

skunk cabbage




Typha angustifolia

narrowleaf cattail

Parentucellia viscosa *

yellow parentucellia




Typha latifolia

common cattail

Plantago lanceolata *

English plantain




Zostera japonica *

Japanese eelgrass

Plantago maritima

seaside plantain










Plantago major *

common plantain




Algae

Potentilla anserina

silverweed




Codium setchellii

"dark green algae"

Rumex spp *

dock




Enteromorpha intestinalis

 

Salicornia virginica

pickleweed




Ulva spp.

sea lettuce

Sium suave

water-parsnip




Urospora penicilliformis

filamentous algae

Solidago canadensis

Canadian goldenrod










Solanum dulcamara *

Bittersweet nightshade










Sonchus asper *

prickly sow-thistle










Sonchus oleraceus *

common sow thistle










Spergularia canadensis

Canadian sand-spurry










Subularia aquatica

awlwort










Triglochin maritimum

sea arrow-grass










Trifolium repens *

white clover










Vicia americana *

American vetch










Vicia gigantea

giant vetch










Vicia sativa *

common vetch












Port Susan Bay Preserve Plant List - Worksheet for Community Notes

* indicates exotic species













Trees

 

 

 

 

 

Alnus rubra

red alder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shrubs

 

 

 

 

 

Lonicera involucrata

black twinberry

 

 

 

 

Mahonia aquifolium

Tall oregon grape

 

 

 

 

Rubus discolor *

Himalayan blackberry

 

 

 

 

Rubus laciniatus *

evergreen blackberry

 

 

 

 

Sambucus racemosa

red elderberry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herbs

 

 

 

 

 

Achillea millefolium

yarrow

 

 

 

 

Aster subspicatus

Douglas' aster

 

 

 

 

Atriplex patula

spearscale

 

 

 

 

Brassica campestris *

field mustard

 

 

 

 

Cirsium arvense *

Canada thistle

 

 

 

 

Cirsium vulgare *

bull thistle

 

 

 

 

Convolvulus arvensis *

field bindweed

 

 

 

 

Cotula coronopifolia *

brass buttons

 

 

 

 

Conioselinum pacificum

Pacific hemlock-parsley

 

 

 

 

Crepis capillaris *

smooth hawksbeard

 

 

 

 

Dipsacus sylvestris *

teasel

 

 

 

 

Epilobium ciliatum

purple-leaved willowherb

 

 

 

 

Equisetum fluviatile

water horsetail

 

 

 

 

Galium spp

bedstraw

 

 

 

 

Glaux maritima

sea milk-wort

 

 

 

 

Heracleum lanatum

Cow-parsnip

 

 

 

 

Hypochaeris radicata *

Hairy cat's ear

 

 

 

 

Lactuca serriola *

prickly lettuce

 

 

 

 

Lilaeopsis occidentalis

western lilaeopsis

 

 

 

 

Lotus denticulatus

meadow birds-foot trefoil

 

 

 

 

Lysichiton americanum

skunk cabbage

 

 

 

 

Parentucellia viscosa *

yellow parentucellia

 

 

 

 

Plantago lanceolata *

English plantain

 

 

 

 

Plantago maritima

seaside plantain

 

 

 

 

Plantago major *

common plantain

 

 

 

 

Potentilla anserina

silverweed

 

 

 

 

Rumex spp *

dock

 

 

 

 

Salicornia virginica

pickleweed

 

 

 

 

Sium suave

water-parsnip

 

 

 

 

Solidago canadensis

Canadian goldenrod

 

 

 

 

Solanum dulcamara *

Bittersweet nightshade

 

 

 

 

Sonchus asper *

prickly sow-thistle

 

 

 

 

Sonchus oleraceus *

common sow thistle

 

 

 

 

Spergularia canadensis

Canadian sand-spurry

 

 

 

 

Subularia aquatica

awlwort

 

 

 

 

Triglochin maritimum

sea arrow-grass

 

 

 

 

Trifolium repens *

white clover

 

 

 

 

Vicia americana *

American vetch

 

 

 

 

Vicia gigantea

giant vetch

 

 

 

 

Vicia sativa *

common vetch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monocots

 

 

 

 

 

Agropyron repens *

quackgrass

 

 

 

 

Agrostis spp

bentgrass

 

 

 

 

Bromus sitchensis

Sitka brome

 

 

 

 

Calamagrostis spp

reedgrasses

 

 

 

 

Carex lyngbyei

Lyngby's sedge

 

 

 

 

Carex spp

sedges

 

 

 

 

Deschampsia cespitosa

tufted hairgrass

 

 

 

 

Distichlis spicata

seashore saltgrass

 

 

 

 

Eleocharis acicularis

needle spikerush

 

 

 

 

Eleocharis palustris

creeping spike-rush

 

 

 

 

Festuca spp.

fescue grasses

 

 

 

 

Hordeum brachyantherum

meadow barley

 

 

 

 

Holcus lanatus *

common velvet-grass

 

 

 

 

Holcus mollis *

creeping velvet-grass

 

 

 

 

Juncus acuminatus

tapertip rush

 

 

 

 

Juncus articulatus

jointed rush

 

 

 

 

Juncus balticus

Baltic rush

 

 

 

 

Juncus bufonius

toad rush

 

 

 

 

Juncus effusus

common rush

 

 

 

 

Lolium multiforum *

Italian ryegrass

 

 

 

 

Phalaris arundinacea *

reed canary grass

 

 

 

 

Phragmites australis *

common reed

 

 

 

 

Puccinellia spp

alkali grass

 

 

 

 

Rhynchospora alba

white beak-rush

 

 

 

 

Ruppia maritima

ditch-grass

 

 

 

 

Scirpus americanus

American bulrush

 

 

 

 

Scirpus lacustris

tule

 

 

 

 

Scirpus maritimus

seacoast bulrush

 

 

 

 

Spartina anglica *

common cordgrass

 

 

 

 

Torreyochloa pauciflora

weak alkali grass

 

 

 

 

Typha angustifolia

narrowleaf cattail

 

 

 

 

Typha latifolia

common cattail

 

 

 

 

Zostera japonica *

Japanese eelgrass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Algae

 

 

 

 

 

Codium setchellii

"dark green algae"

 

 

 

 

Enteromorpha intestinalis

 

 

 

 

 

Ulva spp.

sea lettuce

 

 

 

 

Urospora penicilliformis

filamentous algae

 

 

 

 



Birds at the Port Susan Bay Preserve































Red-throated Loon

Virginia Rail

Turkey Vulture

Black-capped Chickadee

Common Loon

Sora

Bald Eagle

Chestnut-backed Chickadee

Pacific Loon

American Coot

Northern Harrier

Bushtit

Pied-billed Grebe

American Avocet

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Brown Creeper

Horned Grebe

Black-bellied Plover

Cooper's Hawk

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Red-necked Grebe

Pacific Golden Plover

Red-tailed Hawk

Winter Wren

Western Grebe

American Golden Plover

Rough-legged Hawk

Bewick's Wren

Double-crested Cormorant

Semipalmated Plover

Osprey

Marsh Wren

Brandt's Cormorant

Snowy Plover

American Kestrel

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Pelagic Cormorant

Killdeer

Merlin

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

American Bittern

Hudsonian Godwit

Peregrine Falcon

Swainson's Thrush

Great Egret

Marbled Godwit

Prairie Falcon

Hermit Thrush

Great Blue Heron

Long-billed Curlew

Gyrfalcon

Varied Thrush

Sandhill Crane

Whimbrel

Ruffed Grouse

American Robin

Tundra Swan

Greater Yellowlegs

California Quail

Northern Shrike

Trumpeter Swan

Lesser Yellowlegs

Ring-necked Pheasant

American Pipit

Greater White-fronted Goose

Solitary Sandpiper

Band-tailed Pigeon

Cedar Waxwing

Snow Goose

Spotted Sandpiper

Rock Dove

European Starling

Brant

Wilson's Phalarope

Mourning Dove

Hutton's Vireo

Canada Goose

Red-necked Phalarope

Barn Owl

Orange-crowned Warbler

Green-winged Teal

Short-billed Dowitcher

Short-eared Owl

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Cinnamon Teal

Long-billed Dowitcher

Great-horned Owl

Townsend's Warbler

Blue-winged Teal

Stilt Sandpiper

Snowy Owl

Yellow Warbler

Mallard

Common Snipe

Common Nighthawk

Wilson's Warbler

Northern Pintail

Ruddy Turnstone

Vaux's Swift

Common Yellowthroat

Northern Shoveler

Black Turnstone

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous-sided Towhee

Gadwall

Red Knot

Belted Kingfisher

Savannah Sparrow

American Wigeon

Dunlin

Northern Flicker

Song Sparrow

Eurasian Wigeon

Sanderling

Red-breasted Sapsucker

Dark-eyed Junco

Ruddy Duck

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Downy Woodpecker

Golden-crowned Sparrow

Ring-necked Duck

Western Sandpiper

Hairy Woodpecker

White-crowned Sparrow

Lesser Scaup

Least Sandpiper

Pileated Woodpecker

Fox Sparrow

Greater Scaup

Baird's Sandpiper

Willow Flycatcher

Lincoln's Sparrow

Black scoter

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Tree Swallow

Western Meadowlark

Harlequin Duck

Pectoral Sandpiper

Violet-green Swallow

Yellow-headed Blackbird

Long-tailed Duck

Ruff

Cliff Swallow

Red-winged Blackbird

Common Goldeneye

Bonaparte's Gull

Barn Swallow

Brewer's Blackbird

Barrow's Goldeneye

Mew Gull

Stellar's Jay

Brown-headed Cowbird

Bufflehead

Heerman's Gull

American/NW Crow

House Sparrow

Red-breasted Merganser

Ring-billed Gull

Common Raven

Pine Siskin

Common Merganser

Glaucus-winged Gull




American Goldfinch

Hooded Merganser

Caspian Tern




Red Crossbill




Pigeon Guillemot




Purple Finch




Marbled Murrelet




House Finch










Evening Grosbeak

The Land - Water Interface:

Ecology of freshwater & marine water margins



DRIVING DIRECTIONS



1. From UWB to Anacortes City Forestlands

  • From UWB go north on I-5 past Mount Vernon to exit # 230 – State Highway 20. This is about 50 miles from UWB. It is about 1 mile past the big bridge over the Skagit River.

  • Go left at the end of the off-ramp. This will put you on SR 20 going west toward Anacortes.

  • When you get into the town of Anacortes follow the main arterial right (north) and it becomes “Commercial Street”. Turn left at the first traffic light onto 32nd St. Follow 32nd to D Avenue.

  • Turn RIGHT onto D Avenue and follow it one block to 31st St.

  • Turn LEFT onto 31st St. Follow 31st St to the end of the street where the trailhead is. Parking is limited (you can park along the street). Be respectful of people’s driveways. There are NO restrooms here!


2. From Anacortes City Forestlands to Deception Pass State Park (Rosario Head)

  • Retrace you steps out of Anacortes and head back east on SR 20.

  • Go about 4 miles on SR 20 to a RIGHT turn marked to Oak Harbor and Whidbey Island (SR 20).

  • In 2 miles you will go past Lake Campbell on your right. In another 2.6 miles you will come to Pass Lake (also on your right).

  • At the far end of Pass Lake you should turn right onto Rosario Road. After you turn, there is a small gravel parking lot on your right and an entrance sign to Deception Pass State park on your left. Do NOT take this entrance!

  • Continue for 0.9 miles on Rosario Road to the next left turn - marked "Rosario Beach". Turn left here.

  • Follow the road down and go left at the first fork. Continue to follow the road down. At the end you will enter Deception Pass State Park. Park and meet here (restrooms available here).


2. From Deception Pass State Park to Port Susan Bay Preserve (Stanwood)

  • Take highway 20 back north toward Anacortes.

  • At the junction where SR 20 goes either to Anacortes (west) or Mt. Vernon (east), turn right (east) to Mt. Vernon. Follow this to I-5 and get on I-5 going SOUTH.

  • Go about 9 miles, past Mount Vernon, to the exit for Conway (exit 221). Go west into Conway and follow the Pioneer Highway (Hwy 530) south toward Stanwood.

  • When you get to Stanwood, turn right on Cedarhome Dr., cross the train tracks and take the first left onto Florence (or 84th Ave) which eventually becomes Marine Drive.

  • Continue for a couple miles on Marine Drive and then turn right on Boe Road. Continue to the end of Boe. The paved county road ends right at the dirt driveway of the Port Susan Bay Preserve.



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