Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds




Дата канвертавання21.04.2016
Памер186.4 Kb.






Agreement on the Conservation of

African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds

Doc: AEWA/MOP 4.24

Agenda item: 23 a.

Original: English
Date:18 August 2008

4th Session of the Meeting of the Parties

15 – 19 September 2008, Antananarivo, Madagascar



Flyway Conservation at Work – Review of the Past, Vision for the Future"





PROPOSALS FOR AMENDMENT TO THE ANNEXES

TO THE AGREEMENT
Introduction
In accordance with Article X, paragraphs 2 and 3, proposals for amendment to the Agreement can be submitted to the Secretariat by any Contracting Party not less than one hundred and fifty days before the opening of the next session of the Meeting of the Parties.
By the deadline for submission of proposals for amendment the Secretariat received the following proposals:

  1. Proposals for amendments to Annexes 2 (Waterbird species to which the Agreement applies) and 3 (Table 1) submitted by Mauritius on 23 January 2008, which concern the addition of 20 species of waterbirds traditionally considered as seabirds and the conservation status of their populations;

  2. Proposals for amendments to Annex 3 (Table 1) submitted by Italy on 02 April 2008 and on 07 April 2008, which concerns respectively (1) status and definition of populations of the Little Tern (Sterna albifrons) and the Eurasian Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus), and (2) conservation status and definition of several populations, and associated conservation status revision derived from the most recent IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, and revised definition of geographical terms used in range descriptions;

  3. Proposals for amendments to paragraphs 2.1.2(d) and 7.5 of the Agreement’s Action Plan (Annex 3) submitted by Croatia on 03 April 2008, which concern possession, utilization and trade in parts and derivatives of birds and eggs of Column B populations and the frequency of update of the international reviews;

  4. Proposals for amendments to paragraph 4.1.4 and section 4.3 of the Agreement’s Action Plan (Annex 3) submitted by Libya on 08 April 2008, which concern the deadline for phasing out the use of lead shot for hunting in wetlands and measures dealing with management of human activities.

All these proposals for amendments, apart from the one submitted by Italy on 02 April 2008 concerning the status and definition of populations of the Little Tern (Sterna albifrons) and the Eurasian Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus), resulted from the work of the Technical Committee over the triennium 2006-2008 and were sponsored by the respective Contracting Parties.


In accordance with Article X, paragraph 3, the Secretariat transmitted copies of the proposals forthwith to all Contracting Parties and invited the Parties to comment until sixty days before the opening of MOP4. Comments were submitted by Sweden on 04 July 2008 and by the UK on 08 July 2008. Italy withdrew its proposal of 02 April 2008 concerning the status and definition of populations of the Little Tern (Sterna albifrons) and the Eurasian Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus) on 10 July 2008.
In accordance with Article X, paragraph 3, the Secretariat communicated all comments received to the Contracting Parties on 24 July 2008.
This document provides an overview of all proposals for amendments submitted and all comments received.

Action required from the Meeting of the Parties
The Meeting of the Parties is invited to review all proposals for amendments and decide on their adoption.

Overview of all proposals for amendment to the annexes to the Agreement submitted to MOP4 and comments received from Contracting Parties

I. Proposals for amendments submitted by Mauritius on 23 January 2008
I.1 Proposals for amendments to Annex 2 (List of species to which the Agreement applies)


New species proposed for inclusion into AEWA Annex 2




PHAETHONTIDAE

Phaethon aetheras Red-billed Tropicbird

Phaethon rubricauda Red-tailed Tropicbird

Phaethon lepturus White-tailed Tropicbird




SULIDAE

Sula (Morus) bassana Northern Gannet

Sula dactylatra Masked Booby




FREGATIDAE

Fregata minor Great Frigatebird

Fregata ariel Lesser Frigatebird




STERCORARIIDAE

Catharacta skua Great Skua

Stercorarius longicaudus Long-tailed Skua




LARIDAE

Rissa tridactyla Black-legged Kittiwake

Sterna anaethetus Bridled Tern

Sterna fuscata Sooty Tern

Anous stolidus Brown Noddy

Anous tenuirostris Lesser Noddy




ALCIDAE

Alle alle Little Auk

Uria aalge Common Guillemot

Uria lomvia Brunnich’s Guillemot

Alca torda Razorbill

Cepphus grylle Black Guillemot

Fratercula arctica Atlantic Puffin


I.2 Proposals for amendments to Table 1 of Annex 3 (Status of the populations of migratory waterbirds)



Population

A

B

C













PHAETHONTIDAE










Phaethon aetheras Red-billed Tropicbird










aethereus- South Atlantic

1c







indicus- Persian Gulf, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea

1c



















Phaethon rubricauda Red-tailed Tropicbird










rubricauda - Indian Ocean

1c



















Phaethon lepturus White-tailed Tropicbird










lepturus - Persian Gulf, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea

1c



















SULIDAE










Sula (Morus) bassana Northern Gannet




2a
















Sula dactylatra Masked Booby










melanops – W Indian Ocean

1c



















FREGATIDAE










Fregata minor Great Frigatebird










aldabrensis- W Indian Ocean

1c



















Fregata ariel Lesser Frigatebird










iredalei – W Indian Ocean

1c



















STERCORARIIDAE










Catharacta skua Great Skua




1
















Stercorarius longicaudus Long-tailed Skua










longicaudus







1













LARIDAE










Rissa tridactyla Black-legged Kittiwake










tridactyla




2a
















Sterna anaethetus Bridled Tern










melanopterus – W Africa

1







fuligula – Red Sea, E Africa, Persian Gulf, Arabian Sea to W India







1

antarctica – S Indian Ocean




1
















Sterna fuscata Sooty Tern










nubilosa – Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, E to Pacific




2a
















Anous stolidus Brown Noddy










plumbeigularis – Red Sea & Gulf of Aden




1
















Anous tenuirostris Lesser Noddy










tenuirostris –Indian OceanIslands to E Africa







1













ALCIDAE










Alle alle Little Auk










alle High Arctic, Baffin Is – Novaya Zemlya




2a
















Uria aalge Common Guillemot










aalge – E North America, Greenland, Iceland, Faeroes, Scotland, S Norway, Baltic




2a




albionis Ireland, S Britain, France, Iberia, Helgoland




2a




hyperborea Svalbard, N Norway to Novaya Zemlya




2a
















Uria lomvia Brunnich’s Guillemot










lomvia – E North America, Greenland, E to Severnaya Zemlya




2a
















Alca torda Razorbill










torda E North America, Greenland, E to Baltic & White Seas







1

islandica Iceland, Faeroes, Britain, Ireland, Helgoland, NW France







1













Cepphus grylle Black Guillemot










grylle Baltic Sea




1




mandtii Arctic E North America to Greenland, Jan Mayen & Svalbard E through Siberia to Alaska




1




arcticus N America, S Greenland, Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia, White Sea




1




islandicus Iceland




1




faeroeensis Faeroes




1
















Fratercula arctica Atlantic Puffin










arctica Hudson bay & Maine E to S Greenland, Iceland, Bear Is, Norway to S Novaya Zemlya




2a




naumanni NE Canada, N Greenland, to Jan Mayen, Svalbard, N Novaya Zemlya




2a




grabae Faeroes, S Norway & Sweden, Britain, Ireland, NW France




2a




Comments received from Sweden on 04 July 2008
In principle we are positive to the proposed amendment from Mauritius. However, we need more basic information about the argumentation on why these seabirds should be added to Annex II.

Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Accept that the species in question may benefit from coverage by AEWA, but unclear why other measures (IPOA) have failed (as it applies to the same states), and why this agreement would enhance conservation. We are concerned that any further extension of the Agreement to cover seabirds may dilute efforts from already agreed work priorities for existing species and could extend the mandate of the Agreement to identify actions beyond its initial mandate.
II. Proposals for amendments submitted by Italy on 07 April 2008
II.1 Proposals for amendments to Table 1 of Annex 3 (Status of the populations of migratory waterbirds)
II.1.1. Amendment to the definition of Category A1(b)
Current definition: Species which are listed as threatened in Threatened Birds of the World (Birdlife International 2000)
Proposed definition: Species which are listed as threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, as reported in the most recent summary by BirdLife International

II.1.2. Addition of missing definitions of geographical terms used in range descriptions


Gulf: the Persian Gulf, Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea west to the Gulf of Aden
North-west Africa: Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia

South-west Europe: Portugal, Spain and Mediterranean France

South-east Europe: Albania, Armenia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Georgia, Greece, FYR Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia and Turkey
Caspian: Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, South-west Russia, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan
South Europe: South-west Europe and South-east Europe, as defined above

North Europe: North-west Europe and North-east Europe, as defined above


Indian Ocean: Comoros, Madagascar, Mauritius and Seychelles

II.1.3. Changes in status of populations


Recent information or improvement in data quality suggest that a change in status is appropriate for the following populations:
Podiceps cristatus - NW & W Europe

Upgrade from C1 to B2c. Population trend now decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Podiceps cristatus- Black Sea & Mediterraneean (win)

Upgrade from C1 to B2c. Population trend now decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Podiceps nigricollis nigricollis - Europe/South & West Europe & North Africa

Upgrade from C1 to B2c. Population trend now decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International




Podiceps grisegena grisegena - North-west Europe (win)

Upgrade from B1 to A3c. Population trend now decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Podiceps grisegena grisegena - Black Sea & Mediterranean (win)

Upgrade from B1 to A3c. Population trend now decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International
Podiceps auritus auritus - North-east Europe (small-billed)

Upgrade from B1 to A2. Population estimate has decresed to below 25,000

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Pelecanus onocrotalus - Southern Africa

Downgrade from A2 to B1. Population estimated has increased to above 25,000

Estimate and trend updated from results of 2002 CAMP workshop for southern African Seabirds, included in 2005 compilation of African estimates and trends by Tim Dodman


Pelecanus crispus - South-west Asia & South Asia (win)

Upgrade from A2 to A1c. Population estimate has decresed to below 10,000

(also 1a )

Updated estimate and trend from 5th Medmaravis Symposium adjusted in 2005 by Pelican Specialist Group
Phalacrocorax neglectus - Coastal South-west Africa

Downgrade from A1c to A2. Population estimated has increased to above 10,000 (also 1b)

Estimate updated from 2002 CAMP workshop for southern African Seabirds, included in 2005 7th edition of Birds of South Africa


Platalea leucorodia leucorodia- West Europe/West Mediterranean & West Africa

Downgrade from A1c to A2. Population estimated has increased to above 10,000

Estimate updated from Proceedings of Fourth Eurosite Spooonbill Workshop, 2002


Egretta ardesiaca - Sub-Saharan Africa

Downgrade from A3c to B1. Population no longer considered to be decreasing

Adjustment to letter-code estimate (from Handbook of the Birds of the World) advised by B Trolliet and included in 2005 compilation of African estimates and trends by Tim Dodman, who also considered declining trend unjustified


Casmerodius albus albus- W, C & SE Europe/Black Sea & Mediterranean

Downgrade from A2 to B1. Population estimated has increased to above 25,000

New population estimate adopted by the Heron Specialist group in 2002, based on a chapter in the 2000 publication Heron Conservation


Bubulcus ibis ibis- East Mediterranean & South-west Asia

Downgrade from A2 to B1. Population estimated has increased to above 25,000

New estimate adopted by the Heron Specialist group in 2002, based on a chapter in the 2000 publication Heron Conservation


Botaurus stellaris stellaris- South-west Asia (win)

Downgrade from A2 to B1. Population estimated has increased to above 25,000

New population estimate adopted by the Heron Specialist group in 2002, based on a chapter in the 2000 publication Heron Conservation


Cygnus columbianus bewickii- Western Siberia & NE Europe/North-west Europe

Upgrade from A3c to A2. Population estimate has decresed to below 25,000

New estimate compiled from 2003 UK Census report and 2004 Dutch Census report


Anser albifrons flavirostris

Upgrade from A3a to A2

The new estimate, based on a publication of the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, is below 25,000


Branta leucopsis- Svalbard/South-west Scotland

Downgrade from A2 to B1. Population estimated has increased to above 25,000

Unpublished census data from The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust


Branta ruficollis- Northern Siberia/Black Sea & Caspian (also A1a, A 1b, 3a)

Add A3c to current status of A1a, A1b, and A3a. Population estimate has decreased by 50% in 10 years

Unpublished census data compiled by Sergey Dereliev


Alopochen aegyptiacus- West Africa

Upgrade from A2 to A1c. Population estimate has decresed to below 10,000

Updated estimate advised by B Trolliet on basis of recent aerial surveys, and included in 2005 compilation of African estimates and trends by Tim Dodman
Plectropterus gambensis gambensis- West Africa

Upgrade from C1 to B1. Population estimate has decreased to below 100,000

Updated estimate advised by B Trolliet on basis of recent aerial surveys, and included in 2005 compilation of African estimates and trends by Tim Dodman


Somateria mollissima mollissima- Baltic, Denmark & Netherlands

Upgrade from C1 to B2d. Population trend now considered to be fluctuating

Updated estimate published in 2002 paper by Desholm et al.


Polysticta stelleri- Western Siberia/North-east Europe

Upgrade from B1 to A2. Population estimate has decresed to below 25,000 (also 1a)

New appraisal of population by Zydelis et al., submitted for publication in 2004


Bucephala clangula clangula- Western Siberia & North-east Europe/Black Sea

Downgrade from A2 to B1. Population estimated has increased to above 25,000

2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International confirmed that previous estimates, based on winter counts, were too low


Bucephala clangula clangula- Western Siberia/Caspian

Downgrade from A2 to C1. Population estimated has increased to above 100,000

2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International, together with 2001 published data on birds wintering in southern Russia, confirmed that previous estimates, based on few winter counts, were too low


Mergellus albellus- Western Siberia/South-west Asia

Downgrade from A3c to B1. Population no longer considered to be decreasing

Data quality not sufficient to estimate trend


Bucephala clangula clangula- North-east Europe/Adriatic

Downgrade from B1 to C1. Population estimate has increased to above 100,000

2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International confirmed that previous estimates, based on winter counts, were too low

Grus paradisea- Extreme Southern Africa (Also 1b)

Downgrade from A2 to B1. Population estimated has increased to above 25,000

Updated estimate published in 2005 paper by McCann et al.


Grus grus- North-west Europe/Iberia & Morocco

Downgrade from B1 to C1. Population estimate has increased to above 100,000

Updated estimate published in 2003 book by Mewes et al.


Rallus aquaticus- Europe & North Africa

Upgrade from C1 to B2c. Population trend now decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Porzana porzana- Europe/Africa

Downgrade from B2c to B2d. Trend now considerd to be Fluctuating rather than Declining

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Porzana pusilla intermedia- Europe (bre)

Upgrade from A2 to A1c. Population estimate has decresed to below 10,000

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International
Haematopus ostralegus longipes- SE Eur & W Asia/SW Asia & NE Africa

Upgrade from C1 to B2c. Population trend now decreasing

Trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Glareola nordmanni

Downgrade from A3b/A3c to B2b/B2c.

Extensive surveys within the breeding range in 2006 and 2007 revealed the extent of earlier under-estimates.


Glareola ocularis- Madagascar/East Africa

Upgrade from A2 to A1c. Population estimate has decresed to below 10,000

More precise estimate and new trend advised by Frank Hawkins and included in 2005 summary of African estimates and trends by Tim Dodman


Pluvialis apricaria apricaria- Britain, Ireland, Denmark, Germany & Baltic (bre)

Downgrade from A3c to B2c. Population estimate has increased to above 100,000

New estimate published in 2005 report by Ole Thorup. Former estimate too low because birds breeding in S Scandinavia erroneously excluded


Charadrius mongolus

Downgrade from B(1) to C1. Population estimate now above 100,000

Previous estimates neglected the portion of the population which winters on the west coast of India and Pakistan.


Vanellus gregarius

Change A1c to A2. Population estimate now above 10,000

Extensive surveys within the breeding range in 2004 - 2007 revealed the extent of earlier under-estimates. Also qualifies under A1b.


Lymnocryptes minimus- Western Siberia/SW Asia & NE Africa

Downgrade from B1 to C1. Population estimate has increased to above 100,000

Revised estimate based on 2003 status report by Herby Kalchreuter
Tringa glareola- North-west Europe/West Africa

Downgrade from B2c to C1. Population no longer considered to be decreasing

Revised estimate published in 2005 report. by Ole Thorup. Trend from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International



Phalaropus fulicarus- Canada & Greenland/Atlantic coast of Africa

Upgrade from C1 to B2c. Population trend now decreasing

Updated estimate and trend published in 2005 report on North American wader populations by Morrison et al.


Larus leucophthalmusRed Sea and nearby coasts

Downgrade from A2 to B1. Population estimated has increased to above 25,000

Updated estimate published in 2003 PERSGA report on status of seabirds in Red Sea and Gulf of Aden


Larus canus heinei- NE Europe & Western Siberia/Black Sea & Caspian

Downgrade from B1 to C1. Population estimate has increased to above 100,000

Estimate updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Larus argentatus argenteus- Iceland & Western Europe

Upgrade from C1 to B2c. Population trend now decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Larus ridibundus- W Europe/W Europe, W Mediterranean, West Africa

Upgrade from C1 to B2c. Population trend now decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Larus minutus- Central & E Europe/SW Europe & W Mediterranean

Downgrade from B1 to C1. Population estimate has increased to above 100,000

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Sterna bergii velox

Change from A3a to A2. Population estimate has decreased to below 25,000

Estimate changed by Tim Dodman during review of Indian Ocean seabird populations included in Appendix 5 of the 2008 Conservation Status Report.


Sterna sandvicensis sandvicensis- Black Sea & Mediterranean (bre)

Downgrade from A3a to B2a. Population estimate has increased to above 100,000

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Sterna albifrons albifrons- Eastern Atlantic (bre)

Add category A3c. Population now considered to be decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International
Sterna albifrons albifrons- Black Sea & East Mediterranean (bre)

Add category A3b. Reason for this proposal not recorded

Estimate updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International


Chlidonias hybridus hybridus- Western Europe & North-west Africa (bre)

Downgrade from A3c to B1. Population no longer considered to be decreasing

Estimate and trend updated from 2004 compilation of national breeding population estimates and trends by BirdLife International. Population in Algeria added from 2000 national Avifauna


Chlidonias hybridus sclateri- Eastern Africa (Kenya & Tanzania)

Downgrade from A1c to A2. Population estimated has increased to above 10,000

More precise estimate included in 2005 review of African estimates and trends by Tim Dodman

II.1.4. Newly recognised populations and changes in population boundaries


Larus fuscus intermedius: - S Scandinavia, Netherlands, Ebro Delta (Spain): C1

Add new population. Reason for previous exclusion and failure to separate from nominate fuscus unknown
The following taxa have been divided into two populations. Divisions recommended by Heron and Flamingo Specialist Groups, or derived from reviews of literature
Phalacrocorax nigrogularis - Gulf & Arabian Sea: A1b, B2a, B2c

Divide into:

- Arabian Coast;: A1b, B2a, B2c

- Gulf of Aden, Socotra, Arabian Sea: A1b, B1


Egretta garzetta garzetta - Europe, Black Sea & Mediterranean/W & C Africa: C1

Divide into:

- Western Europe, NW Africa: C1

- Central & E Europe, Black Sea, E Mediterranean: B1


Ardea cinerea cinerea - Europe & North Africa (bre): C1

Divide into:

- Northern & Western Europe: C1

- Central & Eastern Europe: C1


Bubulcus ibis ibis- South-west Europe & North-west Africa: C1

Divide into:

- South-west Europe: C1

- North-west Africa: C1


Ardeola ralloides ralloides- Medit., Black Sea & N Africa/Sub-Saharan Africa: A3c

Divide into:

- SW Europe, NW Africa (bre): A1c

- C & E Europe/Black Sea & E Mediterranean (bre): B1


Nycticorax nycticorax nycticorax- Europe & NW Africa/Mediterranean & Africa: B2c

Divide into:

- W Europe, NW Africa (bre): A3c

- C & E Europe/Black Sea & E Mediterranean (bre): B2c


Ixobrychus minutus minutus- Europe & North Africa/Sub-Saharan Africa; B2c

Divide into:

- W Europe, NW Africa/Subsaharan Africa: A2

- C & E Europe, Black Sea & E Mediterranean/Subsaharan Africa: B2c




Botaurus stellaris stellaris- Europe (bre): A3c

Divide into:

- W Europe, NW Africa (bre): A1c

- C & E Europe, Black Sea & E Mediterranean (bre): B2c


Phoenicopterus roseus- East Mediterranean, South-west & South Asia: B2a

Divide into:

- East Mediterranean: A3a

- South-west & South Asia: B2a


Sarothrura ayresi- Ethiopia and Southern Africa: A1a, A1b, A1c

Divide into:

- Ethiopia: A1a, A1b, A1c

- Southern Africa: A1a, A1b, A1c


Charadrius marginatus mechowi- Southern & Eastern Africa: A2

Divide into:

- Inland Eastern to Southern Africa: A2

- Coastal E Africa: A2


Charadrius marginatus Inland Eastern to Southern Africa Change name of population to “mechowi/tenellus inland East and Central Africa”. Literature review by Tim Dodman for Draft Wader Atlas.
Charadrius marginatus West to West-Central Africa Change name of population to “West Africa”. Literature review by Tim Dodman for Draft Wader Atlas.
Tringa totanus NW Europe/W Europe, NW & W Africa – Change name of population to “Northern Europe (breeding)” and downgrade from B2c to C1.

Change of population boundaries recommended by H Meltofte and W Meissner and included in the Draft Wader Atlas.


Tringa totanus central & East Europe/East Mediterranean & Africa - Change name of population to “Central & East Europe (breeding)”.

Change of population boundaries recommended by H Meltofte and W Meissner and included in the Draft Wader Atlas.


Calidris maritima North & West Europe (excluding Iceland) – Change name of population to “N Europe & W Siberia (breeding)”.

Change of population boundaries resulting from literature review and consultation of experts (including Ron Summers) by Derek Scott, and included in the Draft Wader Atlas.


Calidris maritima Add new population called “NE Canada & N Greenland (breeding)” with category A3c.

Change of population boundaries resulting from literature review and consultation of experts (including Ron Summers) by Derek Scott, and included in the Draft Wader Atlas.

II.1.5. Errors in second edition of AEWA conservation status report (corrected for third edition):
Nycticorax nycticorax nycticorax- Sub-Saharan Africa & Madagascar: (B1) amend to C1

Platalea alba- Sub-Saharan Africa: amend from A2 to B1

Dendrocygna bicolor- West Africa (Senegal to Chad): C1 amend to B1

Netta erythrophthalma brunnea- Southern & Eastern Africa: C1 amend to B1

Glareola nuchalis liberiae - West Africa: A(2) amend to C1


Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Support these amendments.

III. Proposals for amendments submitted by Croatia on 3 April 2008
III.1. Proposal for amendments to paragraph 2.1.2(d) of the AEWA Action Plan dealing with trade in Column B populations
Current wording:

Prohibit the possession or utilization of, and trade in, birds and eggs of the populations which have been taken in contravention of any prohibition laid down pursuant to the provisions of this paragraph, as well as the possession or utilization of, and trade in, any parts of such birds and their eggs.


Proposed new wording:

Prohibit the possession or utilization of, and trade in, birds and eggs of the populations which have been taken in contravention of any prohibition laid down pursuant to the provisions of this paragraph, as well as the possession or utilization of, and trade in, any readily recognisable parts or derivatives of such birds and their eggs.


Reason for the amendment:

This amendment is being proposed in order to align the wording of paragraph 2.1.2(d) with the previous paragraph 2.1.1(c) dealing with trade in Column A populations.




Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Support amendment of 2.1.2(d) of the action plan to ensure consistent wording.


III.2. Proposal for amendments to paragraph 7.5 of the AEWA Action Plan on frequency of update of international reviews
Current wording

The Agreement secretariat shall endeavour to ensure that the reviews mentioned in paragraph 7.4 are updated at intervals of not more than three years.


Proposed new wording

The Agreement Secretariat shall endeavour to ensure that the reviews mentioned in paragraph 7.4 are updated at the following intervals:


  1. three years;

  2. six years;

  3. six years;

  4. nine years;

  5. six years;

  6. nine years;

  7. six years.


Reason for the amendment:

This amendment is being proposed in order to adjust the frequency of updating the international reviews to a more adequate and cost-efficient level. Most of the mandatory seven reviews would not benefit from such frequent updates, because they cover issues which are not so dynamic in their development. By bringing the frequency of updating international reviews to more optimal level, the new proposal will establish more reasonable financial and workload implications for the Contracting Parties.




Paragraph 7.4. for reference

The Agreement secretariat, in coordination with the Technical Committee and the Parties, shall prepare a series of international reviews necessary for the implementation of this Action Plan, including:


(a) reports on the status and trends of populations;

(b) gaps in information from surveys;

(c) the networks of sites used by each population, including reviews of the protection status of each site as well as of the management measures taken in each case;

(d) pertinent hunting and trade legislation in each country relating to the species listed in Annex 2 to this Agreement;

(e) the stage of preparation and implementation of single species action plans;

(f) re-establishment projects; and

(g) the status of introduced non-native waterbird species and hybrids thereof.


Comments received from Sweden on 04 July 2008
We believe that the frequency of update of international reviews should be as it is now - no more than three years.

Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Support amendment of Paragraph 7.5 of the action plan to ensure reviews are carried out to a more realistic timetable.
IV. Proposals for amendments submitted by Libya on 8 April 2008
IV.1. Proposal for amendments to paragraph 4.1.4 of the AEWA Action Plan dealing with phase out of use of lead shot for hunting in wetlands
Current wording

Parties shall endeavour to phase out the use of lead shot for hunting in wetlands by the year 2000.


Proposed new wording

Parties shall endeavour to phase out the use of lead shot for hunting in wetlands in accordance with self-imposed and published timetables.


Reason for the amendment:

This amendment is being proposed in order to change the redundant deadline of year 2000 and introduce the approach of customised deadlines following the decision of MOP in its Resolution 2.2, operative paragraph.




Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Agree the action plan does look odd, with a target of 2000, but previous discussion has not revealed appetite for change. However, open ended wording suggested does not convey urgency of action.
Tend to oppose, prefer wording with a fixed time period, perhaps linked to ratification date for parties, e.g. “within 6 years of ratification of this agreement.”

IV.2. Proposal for amendments to section 4.3 of the AEWA Action Plan dealing with management of human activities - new paragraphs to be added
Parties shall minimise the impact of fisheries1 on migratory waterbirds, and where possible cooperate, in order to decrease the mortality in areas within and beyond national jurisdiction; appropriate measures shall especially address incidental killing and bycatch in fishing gear including the use of gill nets, longlines and trawling.


Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Intrinsically linked with the proposed seabird additions which the UK cannot at this time express support, and may need to be revisited in light of discussions on those species. If seabird species agreed to be added, look for consistency of wording with other Agreements.
If seabird proposal accepted, seek amendment in line with similar agreement text in ACAP – suggest: “The Parties shall take appropriate operational, management and other measures to reduce the mortality of waterbird populations listed in table 1 resulting incidentally from fishing activities. Where possible, the measures applied should follow best current practice.”

Parties shall minimise the impact of fisheries on migratory waterbirds resulting in particular from unsustainable fishing that cause depletion of food resources for migratory waterbirds.




Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Again linked to the proposed addition of further seabirds. If that is not taken forward, the UK is not convinced that the case for a particular action directed primarily at sea fishing is required. Section 4.3.1 of the Action Plan should address this with respect to new fisheries.

Parties shall establish and effectively enforce adequate statutory pollution controls in accordance with international norms and legal agreements, particularly as related to oil spills, discharge and dumping of solid wastes, for the purpose of minimizing their impacts on the populations listed in Table 1.




Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Agree with the sentiment, but not convinced that these activities are not already covered.

Parties shall establish appropriate measures to eliminate the threat from non-native terrestrial predators to breeding migratory waterbirds on islands and islets. Measures should refer to contingency planning to prevent invasion, emergency responses to remove introduced predators, and restoration programs for islands where predator populations are already established.




Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Oppose, consider unnecessary as this should be addressed by section 2.5 of the action plan.

Parties shall establish appropriate measures to eliminate threats from aquaculture on migratory waterbirds, especially when dealing with new or enlargement of existing installations, and involving issues such as pollution (from medicinal remains or eutrophication), habitat loss, entanglement risks, and introduction of non-native and potentially invasive species.



Comments received from the UK on 08 July 2008
Sympathetic to the proposal, but consider most of this is covered by 4.3.1 of the action plan already and consider aquaculture projects should be covered by 4.3.1 of the current action plan.

Reason for the amendment:

These new paragraphs are being proposed in order to introduce conservation activities addressing threats to waterbirds resulting from human activities, in particular in marine environment, but also associated with any kind of marine or freshwater aquaculture.




1 “fisheries / fisheries resources” includes aquaculture and refers to either marine or freshwater fish, crustaceans, and molluscs (e.g. bivalves, gastropods and cephalopods).



База данных защищена авторским правом ©shkola.of.by 2016
звярнуцца да адміністрацыі

    Галоўная старонка